Newly Discovered: Animal Fossils

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The crossed-out link is the tail end of the exact link you posted. Just add "http://www."
So... the link was inadvertently truncated... Fair enough..!

How though did Jim find it working... :headspinner:

Split the difference with you... don't trouble ourselves... its proverbially, 'trying to unscramble an omelette'...

:(
 

Mythopoeika

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In my teens, one of our working dogs who laboured under the name of Dickens would bounce on the spot if he found a snake in the paddocks. The feed at the time would've been knee high, so Dickens was clearing three feet or so, on the spot.

He would do this a number of times, then pounce, and on the bounce back, he would fling it, the snake, almost with a flick - over his shoulder. Invariably the snake would have a broken spine.

He got the name when, as a pup, he would run/work with his Mum and do this in the middle of a paddock.

We couldn't call him 'Bloody Hell', so Dickens it was, as in - what the dickens is that dog doing now.
Clever dog - he was using the whipcrack effect to kill the snake. Where did he learn that from?
 

Mungoman

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Clever dog - he was using the whipcrack effect to kill the snake. Where did he learn that from?
I reckon that Animals are habitual Mytho, once they've discovered something that works - they will also adapt another Animals actions. like those monkeys who learnt to wash their grain to seperate the sand out.

I never saw his Mum chase snakes - she was a good working dog and would detour around 'em, or jump over snakes...I reckon Dickens sussed that out himself.

He did eventually die from a bite though.
 

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Not to get off topic but I've seen dogs eat snakes, bees and rats. I really wondered about one that made a point to eat as many bees - wasps, etc. as it could. It never seemed to suffer ill effects.
 

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Not to get off topic but I've seen dogs eat snakes, bees and rats. I really wondered about one that made a point to eat as many bees - wasps, etc. as it could. It never seemed to suffer ill effects.
I've got an old fella who eats clay - doesn't seem to do him any harm.

It's funny, I come out some mornings and there's a space in the lawn - divot parked neatly next to it, with a little depression in the soil.
 

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I've got an old fella who eats clay - doesn't seem to do him any harm.

It's funny, I come out some mornings and there's a space in the lawn - divot parked neatly next to it, with a little depression in the soil.
I'm really never surprised at what dogs eat. My dog eats a bit of dirt, as well as leaves, sticks and on occasion pop.
 

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Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree

Date: April 4, 2019
Source: University of Edinburgh

Summary: A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190404124755.htm
 

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Paleontologists find perfectly preserved dinosaur skin in South Korea

By Brooks Hays
April 9, 2019 at 2:39 PM

April 9 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have discovered a set of dinosaur footprints with preserved skin patterns inside each.

"These are the first tracks ever found where perfect skin impressions cover the entire surface of every track," Martin Lockley, a professor of geology at the University of Colorado, Denver, said in a news release.

https://www.upi.com/amp/Paleontolog...d-dinosaur-skin-in-South-Korea/3011554832473/
 

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430 Million-Year-Old Ancient Fossil Uncovered Revealing Underwater "Cthulhu" with 45 Tentacles

By Richelle H. Concio | Apr 10, 2019 10:39 AM EDT

'According to the researchers, its 45 "tube feet" extend to every direction around its body. This trait makes the creature look bigger when under water. The creature uses the 45 tentacles to creep along the ocean floor, snatch up food, and of course, to terrify its predators. Each of the tubular appendages is covered with a sort of protective armor'.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sc...ling-underwater-cthulhu-with-45-tentacles.htm
 

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Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more

Date: April 11, 2019

Source: University of Texas at Austin

During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years. Now, decades after they were first collected, a researcher has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from dig sites near Beeville, Texas, and found that the fauna make up a veritable 'Texas Serengeti.'

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190411101824.htm
 

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Callichimaera perplexa

'Beautiful Nightmare' Crab Sported Lobster Shell, Shrimp Mouth and Soccer Ball Eyes
By Laura Geggel, Associate Editor | April 24, 2019 02:00pm ET

This newly discovered critter — named Callichimaera perplexa, which means "perplexing beautiful chimera" — had a hodgepodge of body parts. That name references the mythical chimera from Greek mythology, which had a lion's head, a goat's body and a snake's tail.

But unlike the mythological version, this bizarre chimera actually existed: It had the mouth of a shrimp, the claws of a modern frog crab, the shell of a lobster and the paddle-like appendages of a sea scorpion, the researchers found. Its eyes were so giant that it would be like a human with soccer ball-size peepers, said study lead researcher Javier Luque, a postdoctoral fellow in paleontology at Yale University and the University of Alberta in Canada.


Full story and artist's impression of the living creature:
https://www.livescience.com/65316-ancient-crab-giant-eyes.html
 

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Fossil of new dinosaur discovered in Texas by Hillsboro paleontologist

HILLSBORO, Texas (KWTX) Andre Lujan loves fossils. Spend any amount of time at his museum "Texas Through Time" in Hillsboro and this paleontologist will fill your head with more dinosaur facts than you may be able to retain. And now Lujan has even more to teach museum goers as he recently uncovered the fossil of a brand new dinosaur in Texas.

https://www.kwtx.com/content/news/F...s-by-Hillsboro-paleontologist--508882331.html
 

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Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore

Paleontologists say mammal was larger than a polar bear

Date: April 18, 2019

Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190418080758.htm
 
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I reckon this belongs here.

A new species of lizard has been found in the stomach of a dinosaur.

A team of palaeontologists discovered the new specimen of the volant dromaeosaurid Microraptor zhaoianus with the remains of a nearly complete lizard preserved in its stomach.

The animal is unlike any previously known from the Cretaceous and represents a new species, Indrasaurus wangi, researchers said.

It had teeth unlike any other previously known from the Jehol Biota – a collection of 130-million-year-old fossils from northeastern China

https://www.irishexaminer.com/break...es-discovered-in-dinosaur-stomach-936311.html
 
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Maybe this should go inthe Star Wars Thread ...

Thanks to a mass of beautifully preserved fossils, scientists have discovered a peculiar ancient predator: a giant of Cambrian times with the silhouette of a spaceship.

The species’ profile evokes a galactic freighter called the Millennium Falcon from the film Star Wars — a resemblance that helped to inspire the second part of the creature’s scientific name, Cambroraster falcatus. Cambroraster, a distant relative of modern insects, measured up to 30 centimetres long, making it many times bigger than most of its contemporaries, according to an analysis by Joe Moysiuk and Jean-Bernard Caron at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.

milfalfos.jpg

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02317-w
 

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Extinct Giant Penguin

A giant penguin that stood as tall as a person has been identified from fossil leg bones discovered by an amateur palaeontologist on New Zealand’s South Island.

At 1.6 metres and 80kg (12st), the new species, Crossvallia waiparensis, was four times heavier and 40cm taller than the emperor penguin, the largest living penguin.

The penguin joins other oversized but extinct New Zealand birds including the world’s largest parrot, an eagle with a 3m wingspan, 3.6m-tall moa birds and other giant penguins.

Enormous penguins are believed to have rapidly evolved in the Palaeocene epoch – between 66 and 56 million years ago – after the dinosaurs disappeared and large marine reptiles also vanished from southern hemisphere waters that were much warmer than today.

It is not clear why the giant penguins disappeared from the oceans millions of years ago but it may be linked to the arrival of large marine competitors such as seals and toothed whales.

The new species is similar to another prehistoric giant penguin, Crossvallia unienwillia, which was identified from a fossilised partial skeleton found in the Cross Valley in Antarctica in 2000.

Dr Paul Schofield, the senior curator of natural history at Canterbury Museum, said finding closely related species in New Zealand and Antarctica showed the connections between the now-separated land masses.

He added: “When the Crossvallia species were alive, New Zealand and Antarctica were very different from today – Antarctica was covered in forest and both had much warmer climates.”
 

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This Cambrian creature has been known from the Burgess Shale for a century already, but it's only recently that newly discovered fossils have permitted detailed analysis of its features.
Nightmare Creature Had Egg-Shaped Eyes, Swiss Army Knife Head and a Butt Shield

A spiky, armor-plated "walking tank" with bulging eyes, a shield on its butt and a head like a Swiss army knife scuttled along the seafloor more than 500 million years ago, snapping up prey with a deadly pair of mouth pincers called chelicerae.

Researchers discovered astoundingly well-preserved fossils of these thumb-size predators in 2012, and a new study recently described the creatures, determined to be a previously unknown species now dubbed Mollisonia plenovenatrix. Scientists have found dozens of fossils of this species in recent years that include preserved soft tissue of the mouthparts, along with the animals' multiple legs and bulbous eyes.

The mouth pincers, in particular, caught scientists' attention. Chelicerae are found in a diverse group of animals called chelicerates; the group includes more than 115,000 species alive today, among them spiders, scorpions and horseshoe crabs. These fossils provided the oldest evidence to date of these mouth appendages. But these robust pincers may have originated in an unknown species that is even older, the study said. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/nightmare-creature-multitool-head.html
 

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‘Frozen Dragon of the North’: New species of flying creature the size of small plane identified in Canada.

A flying reptile discovered buried in Canadian ice nearly 30 years ago has been confirmed by scientists as a new species.

With a suspected wingspan of up to 33 feet, the newly named Cryodrakon boreas (frozen dragon of the north) was one of the largest flying animals in the planet’s history. It existed during the Cretaceous period, around 76 million years ago.
.
(c) The Indepenent. '19
 

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Ancient Australia was home to 'strange' marsupial giants, scientists find



Researchers are building a picture of palorchestids, which had tapir-like skulls and large scimitar-like claws.

The “strange” anatomy of a family of giant marsupials that roamed eastern Australia and Tasmania for much of the past 25m years has been revealed in a new study.

Scientists had already figured out that palorchestids had tapir-like skulls and large “scimitar-like claws”, but little was known about the limbs of one of the “strangest marsupial lineages to have existed”, according to the paper published by a group of Australian researchers.

By examining 60 fossil specimens of palorchestids of varying geologic ages, the scientists were able to get an idea of how their legs and arms would have looked, functioned and evolved over time.
(c) The Guardian. '19
 

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Archaeology breakthrough: African ostrich eggs relics redefine ancient human history

Source: Daily Express online
Date: 28 November, 2019

SCIENTISTS have uncovered 10,000 years of human cultural interaction within ancient Africa in a groundbreaking new study.

Researchers have intricately linked the development of ostrich eggs used as jewellery to reveal some 10,000 years of human cultural interaction across Africa in pre-history times. Ostrich eggshell beads are some of the oldest ornaments made by humans, being found to date back at least 50,000 years ago in Africa.

https://www-express-co-uk.cdn.amppr...3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s
 

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Is This the First Fossil of an Embryo?

Source: New York Times online
Date: 27 November, 2019

Mysterious 609-million-year-old balls of cells may be the oldest animal embryos — or something else entirely.

A creature called Caveasphaera lived in China 609 million years ago, and it left behind fossils that resemble tiny grains of sand. But as innocuous as those fossils appear, they may speak volumes about our own evolutionary history.

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproj...3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&amp_tf=From%20%251%24s
 

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90-million-year-old ‘comma’ shrimp fossil sheds new light on modern species

Source: folio.ca
Date: 28 November, 2019

Tiny well-preserved fossils discovered in South America reveal oldest known relative of species that still thrives today.

[...]

“Comma shrimp are small, delicate crustaceans with one of the poorest fossil records among marine arthropods—which is shocking as they are abundant today and live in soft sediments with good fossilization potential,” said the study’s lead author, Javier Luque, who conducted the research as a PhD candidate at the University of Alberta with colleagues from Yale University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

https://www.folio.ca/90-million-year-old-comma-shrimp-fossil-sheds-new-light-on-modern-species/
 

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New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear

Source: phys.org
Date: 27 November, 2019

Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate—a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent—with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China.

https://phys-org.cdn.ampproject.org...retaceous-mammal-fossil-evolution-middle.html
 

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'Remarkable’ fossil features an insect trapped in amber, stuck to a dinosaur jaw

Source: sciencemag.org
Date: 29 November, 2019

It isn’t every day that scientists dig up a dinosaur jaw—or unearth the remains of fossilized insects. So paleontologists couldn’t believe their luck when, in 2010, they found the 75-million-year-old jawbone of a duck-billed hadrosaur in Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, Canada, topped with a 7-centimeter-wide blob of amber containing traces of trees and sap-sucking aphids.

The “remarkable” two-for-one fossil would have been preserved in an incredibly unlikely chain of events, the researchers write today in Scientific Reports. The paleontologists believe that after the Prosaurolophus hadrosaur died—and the flesh had decayed off its jawbone—it washed into a river. There, a blob of sticky resin from either a redwood or an araucarian conifer tree also fell. The blob, containing an unlucky aphid, washed up against the bone and was pressed against it by the flow of water, the scientists argue. It was then covered in sediment for tens of millions of years, during which time the resin hardened into amber.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/201...tures-insect-trapped-amber-stuck-dinosaur-jaw
 

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Paleontologists Find Fossils of Six New Dragonfly Species

Source: sci-news. com / News Staff
Date: 3 December, 2019

Six new species of dragonflies that lived about 50 million years ago (early Eocene epoch) have been identified from fossils found in the Okanagan Highlands, an elevated hilly plateau area in British Columbia, Canada, and the U.S. state of Washington.

[...]

They found the fossils represent eight previously unknown species, six of which were well-enough preserved to be given scientific names.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/dragonfly-fossils-07864.html
 

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Japanese fossil flies into the history books

Source: thetimes.co.uk
Date: 5 December, 2019

The fossil of a bird that lived 120 million years ago has been identified by scientists as a previously unknown species.

Fukuipteryx prima, meaning “primitive wings of Fukui” after the prefecture in Japan where it was found, is believed to be a species from the second-oldest avian genus identified.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/japanese-fossil-flies-into-the-history-books-hh5vsnvrq
 
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