Newly Discovered

rynner2

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New species of giant tortoise discovered in Galapagos

Scientists say they have identified a new species of giant tortoise on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific.
They used genetic data to determine that a group of 250 slow-moving reptiles was distinct from another tortoise species on Santa Cruz island.

It is the 15th known tortoise species to be discovered on the archipelago, though four are now extinct.
The new species has been named "Chelonoidis donfaustoi", after a retired Galapagos park ranger.

Giant tortoises in the Galapagos tend to weigh up to 250kg and live longer than 100 years.

Experts had long believed that the two giant tortoise populations on the Santa Cruz island were the same species, but genetic testing proved this to be wrong, Ecuador's environment ministry said in a statement on Wednesday.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34600468
 
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'Monster' spider discovered in Oregon called Cryptomaster Behemoth

The Cryptomaster behemoth may sound like a villain from a superhero film.
But it's actually a newly-discovered species of spider living in the forests of Oregon in the US.
Californian scientists discovered the spider when they went on an expedition to find out more about its close relative, the Cryptomaster leviathan.
They think the behemoth developed differently when the spider population was divided by mountain ranges.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/artic...overed-in-oregon-called-cryptomaster-behemoth
 

Jim

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Read more at http://www.deepstuff.org/giant-kill...ght-on-early-australians/#8w4wmfK56oqwZ8R9.99[/QUOTE]
Merged. It was already posted here.

If you have more material about Aborigines living alongside extinct predators it would be worth splitting the posts off into a new thread.
Its known only from fragmentary remains such as vertebra and skull fragments but when compared with the largest Komodo dragons they yield estimated lengths of 23-30 feet for adults. Ralph Moliner's Dragons in rthe Dust is an excellent overview.
Many of these creatures (like Gigantopithicus) are known only from fragments however in some cases more is discovered years later as with Deinocherius , once known only from its 8 foot arms and wrongly imagined as a macro-preditor.
The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

 
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Mythopoeika

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'Monster' spider discovered in Oregon called Cryptomaster Behemoth

The Cryptomaster behemoth may sound like a villain from a superhero film.
But it's actually a newly-discovered species of spider living in the forests of Oregon in the US.
Californian scientists discovered the spider when they went on an expedition to find out more about its close relative, the Cryptomaster leviathan.
They think the behemoth developed differently when the spider population was divided by mountain ranges.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/artic...overed-in-oregon-called-cryptomaster-behemoth
A 'monster' that's all of 4mm long.
Talk about BBC hype.
 

Coal

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The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

[/QUOTE]
If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
 

PeteByrdie

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The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?

http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/2014/07/16/giant-ripper-lizard/

If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.[/QUOTE]
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
 

Monstrosa

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Behemoth with a body at .156”, really?
Sorry, make that 3.9624mm., as none of the articles I've seen state span but have said variously length and width I think I'm right with saying it's just its body.
If I'm wrong I apologise.
 

Coal

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If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.[/QUOTE]
...Possibly. But my point is the same. You could fly a plane about and spot them - although I suspect there are satellites that can read the newspaper over your shoulder on a good day.
 

Monstrosa

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If it's that big you'd be able to see it with a satellite. My small saloon car is visible on google earth, parked on my drive and that's grey.
Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
Purchase and read Journal of Cryptozoology vol 3. There is an article on using fine-resolution satellite imagery as a tool in cryptozoology. You'll get an answer there.
 

PeteByrdie

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Isn't it a myth that Google use satellites for those images? I thought they just flew planes over.
...Possibly. But my point is the same. You could fly a plane about and spot them - although I suspect there are satellites that can read the newspaper over your shoulder on a good day.[/QUOTE]
I did think, when I first heard about the possibility of megalania's survival, that many people travel the outback by plane, and something so large might struggle to remain hidden. But Mungoman and other forteans of Oz would have a better idea about such things than I.

Also, a syntax error earlier in the thread is screwing up our quotes.:p
 
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Team discovers four new deep-sea worm species

A pink flatworm-like animal known by a single species found in waters off Sweden has puzzled biologists for nearly six decades. New discoveries half a world away by a team of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the Western Australia Museum, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have helped properly identify these elusive creatures through genetic analysis.

In the Feb. 4 issue of the journal Nature, the researchers describe four newly discovered species living near deep-sea cold seeps, hydrothermal vents, and whale carcasses off the coasts of California and Mexico. The new discoveries have allowed the scientists to finally stabilize the placement of the five species, all in the genus Xenoturbella, on the animal tree of life.

The 10-centimeter (4-inch) long Xenoturbella churro, named for its resemblance to the popular fried-dough pastry, is one of four species recently discovered that lie near the base of the evolutionary tree of animals. It was found in a 1,700-meter (5,577-foot)-deep cold seep in the Gulf of California.

"The findings have implications for how we understand animal evolution," said Scripps marine biologist Greg Rouse, the lead author of the study. "By placing Xenoturbella properly in the tree of life we can better understand early animal evolution."

The animal's shifting position on the tree of life began when the first species, named Xenoturbella bocki, was found off the coast of Sweden in 1950. It was classified as a flatworm, then, in the 1990s as a simplified mollusk. In recent years, Xenoturbella has been regarded as either close to vertebrates and echinoderms, or as a more distant relative on its own branch further away. Knowing whereXenoturbella belongs is important to understand the evolution of organ systems, such as guts, brains and kidneys, in animals. ...

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-team-deep-sea-worm-species.html
 
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A nice video of many new species discovered in the 21st century. Includes a couple of good sized animals such as the Giant Peccary from Brazil and the Saola from Indochina.

Its the big ones which give me hope that theres more to be found.
 
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A new tadpole that burrows through sand has been discovered in the Western Ghats of India, scientists report.

The researchers' study, published in the journal Plos One, says that tadpoles would not normally burrow through sand, nor swallow the material, but this "remarkable tadpole" does.

It belongs to the Indian Dancing frog family, Micrixalidae.

The study added that the new findings underlined the "uniqueness of amphibians" of the Western Ghats.

A group of scientists from University of Delhi, University of Peradeniya and Gettysburg College discovered and documented the larvae, and genetically confirmed their identity as Micrixalus herrei. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-35927354
 
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Ten million years ago, a green and black snake lay coiled in the Spanish undergrowth. Once, paleontologists would have been limited to the knowledge they could glean from its colorless fossil remains, but now they know what the snake looked like and can guess how it acted. Researchers reporting on March 31 in Current Biology have discovered that some fossils can retain evidence of skin color from multiple pigments and structural colors, aiding research into the evolution and function of color.

So far, scientists filling the ancient-Earth coloring book with pigment have been limited to browns, blacks, and muddy reds when melanin lasts as organic material. No other pigments have been shown to survive fossilization. But this snake's skin was fossilized in calcium phosphate, a mineral that preserves details on a subcellular level.

The fossilized snakeskin maintained the unique shapes of different types of pigment cells, which would have created yellows, greens, blacks, browns, and iridescence while the animal was alive. The pigments themselves are now decayed, but with the cell shapes—specific to each kind of pigment—mineralized, there's enough information to reconstruct their colors.

"When you get fossil tissues preserved with this kind of detail, you're just gobsmacked when you're looking at it under the microscope," says first author Maria McNamara, a paleobiologist at University College Cork. "I was astounded. You almost can't believe what you're seeing." ...

http://phys.org/news/2016-03-fossilized-snake-true.html



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-fossilized-snake-true.html#jCp
 
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A new giant species of rat has been discovered on the Manus Island in the South Pacific.

This giant rodent, despite its size and heft, has been lurking there for thousands of years, according to scientists, and has only been discovered recently.

Researchers have published a new study unveiling Rattus detentus in the Journal of Mammalogy ,named after the Latin word for “detained”.

This is because Australia is sending asylum seekers to detention camps on the Papua New Guinean island for processing, and is also a reference to the long time that the rat has been living there itself. ...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...overed/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
 

Quake42

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The bones of Megalania, the ~23’ long Australian apex predator were found that were likely only 300 years old. Previous est. say the animal went extinct before the end of the last ice age.
Some claim it’s a cryptid that still may be alive although you’d think, however it would be hard to miss at ~ 8 times the volume of the Komodo Dragon, but?
FOAF alert - but bear with me. There was a programme on last night about the Komodo dragon. My Antipodean flatmate casually mentioned that, on a long outback drive (possibly the Nullarbor) an Aussie friend of hers had seen a "lace monitor" that spanned the width of the road. She apparently stopped the car and the lizard eventually shuffled off, slowly.

She knew nothing of Megalania, but I thought it was worth repeating here. I think she may have mentioned the story before in passing, but it had slipped my mind.
 

GNC

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Sounds like that Nessie sighting that slithered across the road back in the 1930s(?). Is this a new crypto anecdote archetype? Sort of the giant beastie equivalent of the vanishing hitchhiker?
 

Jim

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No the Megalania rumor has been around for hundreds of years and considering the vastness of the outback and the fact that bones only dating back 300 years not before the end of the last ice age make it a valid cryptic. Unlike Nessie which doesn't have the food supply for such a large aquatic beast in Lock Ness. Giant monitors are also rumored to exist in new Guinea and the Congo basin. Numerous treads exist on both the New Guinea dragon and Australian crpytid.
 
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A remarkable discovery has been made in a remote area of the Italian Alps: a new species of viper that has quite possibly been hiding in plain sight for many, many years.

You see, that region of the Alps is also home to a snake called the common European adder (Vipera berus). This new species looks remarkably similar to V. berus, enough so that people probably confused the species and assumed they were the same thing.

Well, no more. A paper published last month in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research finds that the new snake—which has been dubbed V. wasler—has several small morphological differences from the common species, most notably a greater number of scales on various parts of its body.

But the differences beneath the surface are even more important. The researchers—from Museo delle Scienze and other institutions—found thatV. wasler has significantly different genetics than the common adder and all other Western European vipers. Its closest genetic relatives, in fact, are actually two viper species living far away in the Caucasus Mountains.

Genetic tests also revealed that the viper experienced a rather severe genetic bottleneck at some point in the past, limiting its current genetic variability.

As for its distribution, the researchers found that the new species doesn’t have a very large range—less than 500 square kilometers, with just two main sites, each in high-rainfall valleys. The nearby common adder, by comparison, ranges throughout Western Europe and into Eastern Asia. The two species live close-by to each other but their ranges do not appear to overlap. ...

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/extinction-countdown/alps-new-viper/?WT.mc_id=SA_TW_ENGYSUS_BLOG
 

Mythopoeika

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http://www.sciencealert.com/scienti...on-the-ocean-floor?perpetual=yes&limitstart=1

Scientists have found a weird, glowing purple blob on the ocean floor
Strange as it may seem, not absolutely everybody is hunting for rare Pokémon on their phones right now.

While the rest of us are glued to Pokémon Go, working scientists are continuing their quest to find, you know, actual new lifeforms – and a team of marine biologists combing the ocean floor off the coast of Southern California might just have hit pay-dirt, coming across this weird, glowing purple blob.

Discovered by scientists from the Ocean Exploration Trust on the research vessel E/V Nautilus, the purple blob is as yet totally unidentified – creating no small amount of excitement among the researchers as they find it, which you can enjoy in the video above.
 

rynner2

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New species of Pacific beaked whale confirmed
Researchers confirm that as yet unnamed whale sighted by Japanese fishermen was previously unknown to science
Robin McKie Science editor
Saturday 30 July 2016 12.42 BST

Scientists have confirmed that a mysterious, unnamed species of beaked whale roams the northern Pacific Ocean. Sightings of the creature, which has a bulbous head and a beak like a porpoise, had been reported by Japanese fishermen, who call them karasu or ravens, but it was previously unknown to science. It has yet to be given a formal scientific name.

“Clearly this species is very rare and reminds us how much we have to learn about the ocean and even some of its largest inhabitants,” said Phillip Morin, a research molecular biologist at the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). His team revealed the existence of the new species in a paper published in the journal Marine Mammal Science last week.

Japanese researchers sampled three black-beaked whales that had been washed up on the north coast of Hokkaido in 2013 and suggested they could be a new species. Morin and his team at NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Research Center in San Diego decided to investigate and seek specimens from a wider area for testing, and to try to match genetic samples to prove the Japanese claim.

“My first idea was to go to our collection, where we have the largest collection of cetacean samples in the world,” he said last week. In the end, the group analysed 178 beaked whale specimens from around the Pacific Rim and found five that matched the whales found by the Japanese team. Crucially, the finds came from sites that ranged across the Pacific.

One skull was found in the Smithsonian Institution after being recovered from the Aleutian Islands in 1948. Another specimen discovered in Alaska was spotted in the collection of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, and a further sample was obtained from tissue taken from a whale stranded on Unalaska Island in the Aleutians in 2004. Local teachers and students had photographed and measured the animal before putting its skeleton on display at Unalaska high school.

Morin said scientists had more questions than answers about the new species, which is about two-thirds of the size of a Baird’s beaked whale, the cetacean species that the newly identified creature most closely resembles. The largest beaked whales can reach 40 feet (12 metres) and spend up to 90 minutes at a time hunting squid in deep water.

They are hard to research because they may spend only a few minutes at the surface. They rarely breach, travel in small numbers and blend into their surroundings. “They’re hard to see, especially if the water is anything but perfectly calm,” Morin said, adding that acoustic research could help find them so they can be studied.

Japanese researchers are in the formal process of describing the species. This will include giving the whale a Latin and common name and formally defining its measurements and how it differs from other beaked whales.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jul/30/new-species-of-pacific-beaked-whale-confirmed

Coincidentally, last night I was watching an iPlayer documentary about whales;
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01452jz/ocean-giants-3-voices-of-the-sea (2011)

But obviously this new one wasn't on it. So all the text books and documentaries will have to be updated!
 
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