Newly Discovered

Kondoru

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I want a Megalaceros.

or an Auroch.

(I did get a trio of huge horns...so I guess I got an auroch and a half...)
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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RedHandfish.jpg
What the hell are you gaping at?!?

Rare, Mohawk-Wearing Fish Discovered 'Walking' on Seafloor
The discovery of a new group of weird fish — which sport bright-red, Mohawk-like fins on their head and finger-like fins on their sides to help them "walk" on the ocean floor — has delighted the divers who encountered them, just as they were trying to document the extremely endangered species.

Until now, scientists had known of only one population — that is, one group — of red handfish (Thymichthys politus, although it was formerly known as Brachionichthys politus). That group comprises between 20 and 40 individual fish that are living in Frederick Henry Bay, off the southeastern coast of the island of Tasmania, Australia.

Last week, divers from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and the citizen science project Reef Life Survey (RLS) encountered a new population, which also has between 20 and 40 of these bizarre, punkish-looking fish. ...

The newfound population lives a few miles away from the other one, but to protect the fish, researchers aren't disclosing its exact location, according to a statement from the University of Tasmania. Each population lives in an area about the size of two tennis courts — a range that's relatively small, because these relatively sedentary fish don't swim; rather, they walk on the seafloor with their hand-like pectoral fins, the divers said.

"That second population's just a huge relief," Rick Stuart-Smith, an IMAS scientist and RLS co-founder, said in a video. "It effectively doubles how many we think there are left on the planet. But it also gives us hope that there may be other populations out there." ...

There are about 10 known species of handfish, but little is known about their biology and behavior ...

Given the red handfish's low numbers, the newfound population is a welcome discovery, the divers said.


FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/61534-rare-red-handfish-discovered.html


 

EnolaGaia

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How about a parasitic wasp that saws its way out of the host? ...

New 'Slasher' Wasp Comes Equipped with Its Own Body Saw
Freddy Krueger, eat your heart out. A new species of parasitic waspcomes equipped with built-in saws, which the killer insect may use to slice its way out of its host's body.

In a new paper published Jan. 30 in Biodiversity Data Journal, researchers from Penn State and the Natural History Museum in London report the discovery of Dendrocerus scutellaris, a wasp less than 0.1 inches (3 millimeters) long that sports a series of jagged spines along its back.

Based on the wasp's anatomy, researchers suspect it is an endoparasitoid, a type of wasp that lays its eggs inside a host, often a caterpillar or adult insect. The eggs hatch, and the larvae feed on the host from the inside out. When the food supply runs out and the larvae mature into their adult forms, they chew their way out of the host.

D. scutellaris lacks the pointy jaws that most endoparasitoid wasps use to gnaw their way out of their hosts. For that reason, the study authors argue that the saw-like structure on the wasp's back is its ticket to escape; when it's time to free itself, the wasp may rub the structure — called a mesoscutellar comb — against the inside of the host to slice its way out. ...
FULL STORY (With Photo): https://www.livescience.com/61600-slasher-wasp-with-body-saw.html

JOURNAL ARTICLE: https://bdj.pensoft.net/article/22676/
 

Cochise

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How about a parasitic wasp that saws its way out of the host? ...



FULL STORY (With Photo): https://www.livescience.com/61600-slasher-wasp-with-body-saw.html

JOURNAL ARTICLE: https://bdj.pensoft.net/article/22676/
The reproductive cycles of the more parasitic insects require either a strong stomach or a limited imagination among the researchers. I remember being startled by a book on North American insects - I only wanted to know which ones would poison me, but I ended up reading on in horrified fascination.
 

Jim

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Speaking about parasitic wasp, the "Tarantula Hawk". This wasp is has the most painful sting of the creepy crawly's. It strings the tarantula then lays an egg(s) inside the poor paralyzed creature.
 
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Speaking about parasitic wasp, the "Tarantula Hawk". This wasp is has the most painful sting of the creepy crawly's. It strings the tarantula then lays an egg(s) inside the poor paralyzed creature.
Just thinking of a giant one of those in an SF/Horror Film really the business!
 

Brig

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Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals. Unlike the creepy jerk in our town who bought a German Shephard dog for his purpose. Luckily a few locals ran the deviant out of the area.
 

oldrover

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Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals. Unlike the creepy jerk in our town who bought a German Shephard dog for his purpose. Luckily a few locals ran the deviant out of the area.
Actually no, Iwon't ask.
 

Dr_Baltar

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Contrary to what the site implied; the monkys were only interested in other monkeys. They did not mate with foreign animals.
You must have missed this bit:

"There’s also the macaque, which has been spotted having sex with deer numerous times."
 

Yossarian

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There was an extraordinary paper written a while back on macaque/deer sexual habits, and whether they represented some kind of inter-species social function. Never got my head around it.

Up until a couple of years ago, I worked in a zoo, and the alpha male Orangutan - not a monkey, I know - had (before my time) once apparently had his way with a pigeon, which can't have been a pretty sight.
 

Brig

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Brig

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
 

Dr_Baltar

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Dr. Baltar did you bother to read the article? They implied one thing in the head but the story did not verify it. That there are sex deviants among simians is no surprise. Humans are discustingly also included. But said story was simply about "red" and "blue" monkeys. It said nothing about other animals.
Apart from the line in the article I quoted (after I'd read the article).
 
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A little snake but venomous.

July 16 (UPI) -- Already home to some of the most venomous creatures in the world, northern Australia's wilderness just got a little bit more dangerous.

Scientists have discovered a new species of bandy-bandy snake, Vermicella parscauda, on a remote peninsula in Australia's Far North.

Biologists from the University of Queensland discovered the snake by chance while conducting a sea snake survey. The species is reactively small and narrow. It's scales are black with white stripes.

"Bandy-bandy is a burrowing snake, so Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release. "We later discovered that the snake had slithered over from a pile of bauxite rubble waiting to be loaded onto a ship."

https://www.upi.com/New-venomous-snake-species-found-in-Australia/6791531744709/
 

Mikefule

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"...Freek Vonk from the Naturalis Museum and I were surprised to find it on a concrete block by the sea," Bryan Fry, an associate professor at Queensland, said in a news release.
Yes, if I found a previously unknown venomous snake, I'd react with some degree of surprise too. I might even go so far as to say I was startled.
 

Xanatic*

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They should really have named the snake after Freek Vonk, that is an excellent name.
 
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Could even be a source of antibiotics.

Video: Newly discovered rare deepwater coral identified off Irish coast
A type of “black coral” identified may be an entirely new species, says Marine Institute
about 23 hours ago Updated: about 2 hours ago

Gardens of rare and newly discovered deepwater coral and an entire reef of sponges have been identified off the Irish west coast by a team of Irish and British scientists.

A type of “black coral” identified on the mission may be an entirely new species, according to Marine Institute lead expedition scientist David O’Sullivan and Prof Louise Allcock of NUI Galway.

Mr O’Sullivan notes too that the sponge reef is the first habitat of its type discovered in Irish waters, and matched only by a similar reef in Canadian waters.

Plymouth University scientist Dr Kerry Howell says she hasn’t seen a sponge reef like it in 20 years of studying the deep north-east Atlantic, and says that such features may provide a new source of antibiotics.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/sci...er-coral-identified-off-irish-coast-1.3573795
 
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