Newly Discovered

oldrover

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Aha! Makes finding a Tas wolf all the more possible; doesn't it?
Nope. This has no connection with the thylacine at all, an animal whose extinction is very well documented. However if you Google Sailugem bear, all you get is various re-syndication if this article from the Siberian Times, the world's least plausibke newspaper. It's an advert for Kaichi Travel, the tour comoany who supposedly came up with the photo. There's nothing unusual about this bear's colour, nor is there any way of telling where this photo was taken.
 
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AlchoPwn

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I'm glad you said this. I cringe at every reference to that site. Ridiculous stuff.
Agreed. The number of times you go "reference diving" and come up with Siberian Times. It makes me throw up in my mouth a little bit.
 

Brig

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You mean the Siberian Times beats out America's" Star" for lunacy? It must be a real nutcase. I've never even seen a Siberian Times ... lucky me.
 

Mikefule

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Wow, that raises some random thoughts.

The orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile: what is its armour class? how many hit points? How much damage does it do? Does it sit coiled on a hoard of gold and gems?

More seriously* the way to tell the difference between a crocodile and an alligator (apart from whether you see it later or after a while) is the length of the snout. The apparent difference between the dwarf crocodile and the orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile is the width of the band of gaffer tape keeping its jaws shut. (Well, that and the whole being orange and living in a cave thing.) I can see why they tape up the jaws for handling these beasts, but whose job is it to remove the tape? Scope here for bullying the unpopular intern, I think.

Genuinely seriously: interesting that scientists made an initial assumption that the orange cave dwelling ones were ordinary ones which somehow fell into a cave, couldn't get out, and were condemned to spend their lives interpreting the world above from the shadows thrown on the back wall. However, with modern methods, they were able to determine genetically that they were separate species. It's not that long ago that similar mistakes would have gone undetected.

*But not very seriously.
 
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A new little octopus.

No matter how deep scientists venture, the ocean always seems to be full of surprises. In late February, researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) took a deep-sea robot for a spin near Hawaii, and they stumbled across a single, small octopus unlike any they’d ever seen before.

For a few years, the NOAA has dispatched the ship Okeanos Explorer to oceans all over the world to explore with its deep-diving robot, the Deep Discoverer. For the first dive of the year, the researchers sent the robot to examine the ocean floor northeast of Hawaii’s Necker Island. As it trawled around about two-and-a-half miles below the surface, the Deep Discoverer came across a tiny, ghost-like octopus hanging out on a large, flat rock all by itself, Sarah Laskow reports for Atlas Obscura.

“This octopus is now confusing several of our shore-based scientists who have never seen anything like this,” one of the researchers can be heard saying on a video taken during the dive.

While the octopus resembles some common species of shallow-water octopi, it has some differences that set it apart, the first being its ghostly color. Most octopi have chromatophore pigments, which allow them to change color. But the mysterious little octopus appears to be missing them, which explains its ghostly, iridescent appearance. Researchers also note that it only had a single row of suckers along each tentacle instead of two, Maddie Stone reports for Gizmodo. ...

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=socialmedia



Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...nknown-octopus-180958290/#t4IA3dKK5oyVEiKq.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

 

Nemo

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Millipede so rare 'it doesn't even have a name' discovered

A millipede so rare it is "new to science" and does not even have a common name, has been found in Neath Port Talbot.

Youngsters on a Halloween insect hunt found the bug at Craig Gwladus Country Park, near Cilfrew, on 30 October.

It has since been identified as the Turdulisoma cf turdulorum millipede, so rare it is only the third known site where it has been found.

The first was Aberkenfig, Bridgend, in 2017, by local expert Christian Owen.

It was subsequently confirmed as a new species by Dr Jörg Spelda at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology in Germany.

All findings have been in south Wales, with the Craig Gwladus discovery uncovered among leaf litter and under old wood along the former Gelliau Colliery Tramroad at the park.
(c) BBC '18.
 

lordmongrove

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Wow, that raises some random thoughts.

The orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile: what is its armour class? how many hit points? How much damage does it do? Does it sit coiled on a hoard of gold and gems?

More seriously* the way to tell the difference between a crocodile and an alligator (apart from whether you see it later or after a while) is the length of the snout. The apparent difference between the dwarf crocodile and the orange cave dwelling dwarf crocodile is the width of the band of gaffer tape keeping its jaws shut. (Well, that and the whole being orange and living in a cave thing.) I can see why they tape up the jaws for handling these beasts, but whose job is it to remove the tape? Scope here for bullying the unpopular intern, I think.

Genuinely seriously: interesting that scientists made an initial assumption that the orange cave dwelling ones were ordinary ones which somehow fell into a cave, couldn't get out, and were condemned to spend their lives interpreting the world above from the shadows thrown on the back wall. However, with modern methods, they were able to determine genetically that they were separate species. It's not that long ago that similar mistakes would have gone undetected.

*But not very seriously.
The teeth of the lower jaw of a crocodile are visable when the mouth is shut. The largest alligator is the black caiman at a maximum of 20 feet. The biggest crocodile is the saltwater crocodile at 28 feet and possibly as much as 30. Nile crocs probably top the 25 foot mark on occasion.
 
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An interesting new salamander.

Need proof Florida is truly the weirdest state of the Union?

Just look at one of its latest discoveries: A giant salamander that is spotted like a leopard and has fronds resembling a Christmas tree on its head. The scientific journal PLOS One published a study about the supersized salamander on Wednesday. The salamander, officially called the “reticulated siren,” measures up to 2 feet in length when fully grown, and are completely aquatic, according to National Geographic.

David Steen, a wildlife ecologist at the Georgia Sea Turtle Center who discovered the creature said its existence has been rumored for decades.
“It was basically this mythical beast,” Steen told National Geographic. He first saw the creature in 2009, but his team wasn’t able to find other samples for another five years. An official study was finally completed in 2018 and just published in PLOS ONE.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/reticulated-siren-salamander-weird-florida_us_5c0853b3e4b0bf813ef3d0a9?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=__TheMorningEmail__120618&utm_content=__TheMorningEmail__120618+CID_b2f8747eaa8e9dcdb121f48bf55b4274&utm_source=Email marketing software&utm_term=giant leopard-spotted salamander&ncid=newsltushpmgnews__TheMorningEmail__120618
 
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Bullseye

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So with this one and the Hellbender (up to 70cm) found in some Eastern States of US, the Chinese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.8m) and the Japanese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.5m). Now if someone could have a good old look about for the giant salamander reported from the Pacific North West States (alleged up to 2m) that would be great !. Looked at geographically it makes sense.
 

Jim

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So with this one and the Hellbender (up to 70cm) found in some Eastern States of US, the Chinese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.8m) and the Japanese Giant Salamander (historically up to 1.5m). Now if someone could have a good old look about for the giant salamander reported from the Pacific North West States (alleged up to 2m) that would be great !. Looked at geographically it makes sense.
No such "known" salamander exist in North America. The eastern Hellbender is our largest and can approach 29" (0.98 m). We also have the mudpuppy up to 16" (0.49 m) which I've seen while fishing.
 

Bullseye

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No such "known" salamander exist in North America. The eastern Hellbender is our largest and can approach 29" (0.98 m). We also have the mudpuppy up to 16" (0.49 m) which I've seen while fishing.

Exactly, "no such known", but there have been reports in the PNW of giant salamanders.
 
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Is it an orange worm?

A London-based business specializing in sustainable building materials says it has paid $25,000 to name a newly discovered genus of wormlike amphibian after President Donald Trump.

EnviroBuild announced Tuesday that it would be using Dermophis donaldtrumpi as the name for the caecilian — an amphibian with no legs and poor eyesight. The business says the name still will need to undergo peer review, but that other animals have been named after presidents in the past.

Co-founder Aidan Bell authored a blog post that likened the qualities of the animal, which is native to Panama, to Trump.

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/...like-amphibian-named-donald-trump/2358123002/
 

Mythopoeika

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Is it an orange worm?

A London-based business specializing in sustainable building materials says it has paid $25,000 to name a newly discovered genus of wormlike amphibian after President Donald Trump.

EnviroBuild announced Tuesday that it would be using Dermophis donaldtrumpi as the name for the caecilian — an amphibian with no legs and poor eyesight. The business says the name still will need to undergo peer review, but that other animals have been named after presidents in the past.

Co-founder Aidan Bell authored a blog post that likened the qualities of the animal, which is native to Panama, to Trump.

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/...like-amphibian-named-donald-trump/2358123002/
I'm guessing that it excretes through its mouth.
 
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Kew highlights new plant and and fungi discovweies.

A new bug-eating pitcher plant, an edible “hedgehog” mushroom and a weird species living in a waterfall are among the new plants and fungi found this year.

The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, is highlighting some of its top discoveries for 2018, from among the scores of species of plants and fungi found in places ranging from the mountainsides of the Andes to Asian black markets. Kew and its partners have found some 128 vascular plants and 44 species of fungi around the world this year, many of which are already under threat of extinction just as they have been recorded for the first time.

The plant experts have selected some of their highlights, including a “showy” orchid first found on the black market in Laos, a new wild relative of the commercial Allspice tree and two types of morning glories from Bolivia. The biggest new discovery is an 80ft (24m) tree from Guinea, which is endangered by the clearance of tiny remnants of rainforest among the hills of the coastal plain where it dominates the canopy.

https://www.irishexaminer.com/break...s-among-new-species-found-in-2018-893520.html
 
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