News From China

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,256
Likes
8,918
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#1
Seems to me we are getting much more info now from the Republic of China, and as the Olympics approach there will be much, much more.

Here's a strange one (saw it on TV the other day):
All eyes on the ‘nail house’ as lone protester waits on high
Jane Macartney in Beijing

Yang Wu may have the attention of all China focused on his battle with the might of the state, but his wife is getting worried.

It is several days since Wu Ping had contact with her husband, who is holed up in their home atop a pinnacle of land carved into an island by property developers digging out the foundations for a new complex. “I don’t know anything about his physical condition because no one can climb up to the house now,” she told The Times. “It is too dangerous and so I’m worrying about him.”

Mr Yang has been holding out for a week in his “nail house” — a play on a phrase for troublemakers who stick up like nails and refuse to go along with government orders.

Under the eyes of the nation, the 51-year-old martial arts expert is battling to protect his rights against demands of property developers who have been trying to raze his block in the southwestern city of Chongqing since 2004. He and his wife have refused to follow the other 280 residents who moved out in exchange for compensation or a flat in the new development.

Mrs Wu says that the couple have the law on their side, particularly since Communist China’s first property law was passed this month, although it does not take effect until October.

Mr Yang scrambled up the near-vertical cliff to his home last Thursday, the day before a government deadline to vacate the property expired. Using ropes, he hauled up supplies of water and gas bottles to sustain him during the siege. He planted a national flag on the roof and hung out a hand-written banner: “A citizen’s legal property is not to be violated.”

The couple have been offered about £135,000 in compensation, or two higher floors of the new building. They have turned down both because they want a lower storey so that Mrs Wu can run her restaurant.

Ms Wu said: “I have no other request but to give me a house similar in area and position to the current one.”

Wang Hongju, the Mayor of Chongqing, has said that the Government would try to solve the stand-off but would not tolerate an exorbitant price or unreasonable demands. Yesterday local officials gave Mr Yang one more day to leave the property or face demolition.

The Chinese media has waded into the debate. The China Youth Dailycommented: “If the Government does not respect people’s rights in this case, it will raise suspicions about the entanglement of civil rights, property development and government interests.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/w ... 582245.ece
 

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,256
Likes
8,918
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#2
Demolition ends China house row

The home of a Chinese family who defied property developers in a high-profile campaign has finally been demolished.
The family of Wu Ping gave up defending their Chongqing house after reportedly reaching a deal with the authorities.

The "nail house" - so called because it refused to be hammered down - had been isolated in a huge construction pit after other households agreed to move.

The dispute became a cause celebre for ordinary Chinese people who have tried to fight property developers.

But the struggle came to an end on Tuesday, when a few dozen people looked on as the two-storey brick building was broken up by an earth mover.

A night watchman at the building site told AFP news agency: "The stubborn nail has been removed."

Mrs Wu, when told the house had been demolished, reportedly said: "Oh well."

New law

Her husband, Yang Wu, stayed in the house until the demolition, hanging out banners reading: "The legal private property of citizens cannot be violated."

The family had insisted on staying in their home, because they were not satisfied with the compensation the authorities were offering.

Mrs Wu said earlier that she had been offered an apartment in a planned new complex, or a cash settlement, but she turned both down.

According to state news agency Xinhua, the couple have now agreed to move into another apartment elsewhere in Chongqing.

Accusations of illegal land grabs and corruption have dogged China's fast-paced building expansion, and the family's resistance has been portrayed as heroic by state media.

China's parliament last week passed a landmark law to boost protection of property rights for individuals.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-p ... 520317.stm
Video here
http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/nol/newsid ... w=bb&mp=wm
 

Xanatico

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,101
Likes
9
Points
54
#3
As I understood they were running a restaurant in the downstairs part of the house. So just giving them another apartment doesn´t seem enough.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#4
Shanghai cancels St Patrick's Day parade over fears of revolt
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/fro ... 86296.html
CLIFFORD COONAN in Beijing

Mon, Mar 07, 2011

THE ST Patrick’s Day parade in China’s financial capital Shanghai has been cancelled amid concerns the “Jasmine Revolutions” sweeping states with authoritarian governments in the Middle East could spread to the Asian giant.

The Communist Party, staging its annual National People’s Congress in Beijing, said yesterday calls for protests in China were doomed because Chinese people treasured peace and stability.

However, it is clearly worried about the spread of anti-government sentiment, and has taken steps including stopping next Saturday’s annual parade for Irish expatriates and their Chinese friends and families in Shanghai. The parade attracts thousands of visitors every year and is part of a four-day event.

“The parade is off. We were told by the Public Security Bureau we could not have a public gathering. We’re bitterly disappointed as we spent two months working on it, but that’s life,” said one member of the organising committee who requested anonymity.

The annual parade was due to move along Nanjing Donglu, Shanghai’s most famous street, which runs past People’s Square – a site specified in online calls for citizens to take “an afternoon stroll” in a sign of passive resistance.

Organisers were refused permission to stage the parade elsewhere. The Irish community will hold a scaled-down event in the Shanghai Centre plaza.

The Beijing St Patrick’s Day parade, due to be held on Sunday, March 20th, in Chaoyang Park, a few kilometres from the city centre, will go ahead as planned.

“Over the past 30 years or more, China’s success and economic progress has been broadly recognised. The Communist Party’s leadership and government’s policies are in line with the people’s will and their hearts,” said Wang Hui, spokeswoman for the Beijing city government.

“Cool-headed people know these people have chosen the wrong place, and their ideas and plans are wrong. In Beijing we have had and will have no such incidents,” she said.

It is hard to tell what security presence is in Beijing to stop the phantom protests taking place on the Wangfujing shopping street and what is here to provide the usual heavy security for the National People’s Congress. About 740,000 police, security guards and ordinary citizens have been drafted in to provide security for the congress.

Foreign reporters have been barred from sites of would-be protests and threatened with having their residence visas revoked.
 

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,256
Likes
8,918
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#5
China's new economic power fans fear, BBC poll finds
By Andrew Walker, Economics correspondent, BBC World Service

Public concern is growing about China's increasing economic power, according to a new global poll conducted for BBC World Service.
The survey was carried out by the international polling firm GlobeScan/PIPA among more than 28,000 people in 27 countries.

It reveals that the respondees who say that China becoming more powerful economically is a bad thing have increased substantially across a number of China's key trading partners—and especially in the major rich countries
Compared to BBC World Service polling in 2005, negative views of China's growing economic power rose - and are now in the majority - in the US, France, Canada, Germany and Italy.

Negative views also grew significantly in countries such as the UK and Mexico but remain outnumbered by positive views in those countries.
But across the survey as a whole, China was still viewed positively.
Across all countries polled, an average of 50% expressed a positive view of China's economic power, while 33% were negative.

The two nations with the most positive views of China's economic growth were in Africa - Nigeria (82%) and Kenya (77%).
Indeed positive views were in the majority in all five African countries surveyed.

Across the developing nations polled, positive views of China were more numerous than negative ones - with the exception of just one country, Mexico.

So what is behind these feelings about China's growing economic weight?
The survey does not tell us for sure, but there are some obvious candidate explanations.

In the period since the earlier poll - in 2005 - the world has been through an episode called the great recession, a result of the financial crisis.
The developed world was hard hit. The rebound now underway in the global economy is led by developing countries, notably China.
The recovery in the rich nations by contrast is more sluggish. The rise in unemployment caused by the recession is likely to take years to reverse.

Tom Friedman, the influential New York Times columnist and Pullitzer Prize winner, told the BBC: "there's no question that China's rise, coinciding with a sense of stagnation and paralysis among many of the leading western democracies, is psychologically unsettling".

There is also a very specific economic issue, and that does emerge in the BBC survey.
People were asked if they think China trades fairly with other countries.
Those saying China is unfair were above 50% in Japan, South Korea, Germany and Italy. In the US, the figure was 45%, compared with 24% saying that it was fair.

The particular policy that has attracted so much attention, in the media and in business, is China's approach to its currency, holding its value down by intervening in the foreign exchange market.
Critics, and there are many of them, say that gives Chinese industry an unfair competitive advantage.
Tom Friedman is particularly caustc about this policy: "That's part of a broader concern of people which is that China is still in many ways a freeloader on the international system. It's not a stakeholder."

And what about the more positive view in the developing world?
In some countries especially in Africa, China has been investing heavily.
That brings jobs and infrastructure, though critics do see it as a grab for African resources, especially its energy and metals.

Perhaps some also welcome the sight of a developing nation emerging as an increasingly serious challenger to the rich world.
In some business circles, even among those who criticise China's policies, many nonetheless see the country as an opportunity.
More than a billion consumers are going to buy more goods and services as their living standards rise and Chinese firms will not be able to supply everything.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12867892
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#6
Two arrested over air pollution rumours
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/wor ... 14273.html
CLIFFORD COONAN in Beijing

Wed, Jun 13, 2012
POLICE IN Wuhan in central China have arrested two people for spreading rumours that a weird cloud of pollution covering the city of nine million people was caused by an explosion at a chemical plant and a leak of toxic gases. The official line is the cloud was caused by farmers burning straw and plant matter.

Residents were advised to stay indoors after the haze, which was described as grey-yellow in colour, was seen in seven cities in Hubei province, including Wuhan.

It has also affected areas in the provinces of Hubei, Anhui, Jiangxi and Jiangsu since Monday, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Police gave no details about the arrests but said the rumours spread across the internet, triggering public panic in the city.

A government spokesman described air quality as a “grim challenge”. “China is only at its infant stage of industrialisation, hence it’s impossible to fix the problem overnight,” said foreign ministry spokesman Liu Weimin.

The news of the pollution comes as China is trying to reduce pollution levels and also improve the way it reports on emissions and environmental scandals.

Official air-quality statistics often contradict non-government measurements, and are often viewed with distrust, hence the popularity of sites such as the US embassy’s, which monitors air quality in Beijing and Shanghai.

Wu Xiaoqing, a vice-minister of environmental protection, last week called on foreign embassies, especially the US embassy, to stop publishing data on particulate pollution, saying only the Chinese government had authority to do so.

The US said it was providing information for its citizens and that China was welcome to provide similar information about US cities to its citizens living there.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#7
China to open atomic bomb site to tourists
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-19958011

China detonated its first atomic bomb in 1964

Related Stories

China's Communist Party: 'Red tourism' in Yan'an
China's 'red tourism' makes revolution fun Watch

China has unveiled a plan to open the site where it detonated its first atomic bomb to tourists, state-run media reports.

About 6m yuan ($960,000, £595,000) will be spent making the remote Malan base in Xinjiang region tourist-friendly, an official told Xinhua news agency.

Visitors will be able to see scientists' laboratories and a 300-metre tunnel used for air strikes.

China tested its first atomic bomb on 16 October 1964.

More than 40 nuclear tests have been carried out in Xinjiang over the decades before a moratorium was called in the 1990s.

Beijing's Tsinghua University and the local government are developing the site, located in a desert area in north-western China, Xinhua says.

Officials say that the base at Malan will be turned into a "red tourism site" - locations designated by the Communist Party to celebrate what it regards as historic events, says the BBC's Martin Patience in Beijing.

However it is not clear how many tourists the nuclear facilities will actually attract, as it is in one of the remotest regions in the country, our correspondent adds.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#8
The Chinese farmer who amputated his own leg
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-25211346
By Sally Abrahams
BBC News

Chinese farmer Zheng Yanliang, who amputated his own leg because he could not afford to pay for hospital

Mr Zheng sawed off his own leg in 2012 because he could not afford to pay for hospital costs

A Chinese farmer who sawed off his diseased leg because he could not afford hospital treatment bills has shone a spotlight on gaps in the health care system.

Zheng Yanliang, who is from Hebei province in north China, developed an infection in his leg last year and the blood circulation to it began to fail. That made the problem worse and gangrene set in.

By the time he went to the doctor, Mr Zheng, 47, was told he would need an operation and could lose his leg. It was then that Mr Zheng realised he was in big trouble.

"I asked how much it would cost to do this operation," he said.

"The doctor said an operation on one leg would cost more than 300,000 yuan ($49,000, £30,000) and it would cost more than a million yuan if I had operations on both legs. I can't afford it. I only had 20,000 yuan."

Mr Zheng's case, although extreme, has highlighted the flaws in China's health care system, particularly for those living in the countryside.

He was covered for some medical treatment under the government's rural health insurance scheme. But he had to pay the costs upfront and could only claim back some of them.

'Leg turned black'
Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

I told my wife that I would saw it off. She wasn't happy about it”

Zheng Yanliang
Without enough money to pay for treatment or surgery, Mr Zheng felt he had no choice but to return to his home in Dongzang village in Qingyuan county, where he endured months of extreme pain.

"I lay in bed for more than three months. My leg turned black. The skin and the flesh were all black," he said.

"There were maggots in the flesh. I could see the bone in my right leg. I felt sick when I saw it."

Finally, Mr Zheng could not bear to suffer any more and decided to take drastic action.

"I told my wife that I would saw it off. She wasn't happy about it. We had an argument and she went out," he said.

"I found a hacksaw under the bed and a small knife, and I just sawed it off. It took about 20 minutes. I was sweating like a pig."

Mr Zheng remained conscious throughout, biting on a stick wrapped in a towel to try to alleviate the immense pain.

The DIY surgery, which Mr Zheng performed in April 2012, has only recently been reported in the Chinese media. It has prompted a debate about the inequalities in China's health care system, especially for low-income families.

Many ordinary Chinese people have been so moved by Mr Zheng's story that they have donated more than 300,000 yuan to his cause. He has also been offered free medical treatment - at least for now. But Mr Zheng is worried about the future.

"I don't have income. I hope the government or the hospital will look after me. What if I get sick?" he said.

File photo: Farm in China
Rural areas are at a disadvantage because most health care services in China are focused on cities
'A lot of burden'
It is a reasonable question. Like Mr Zheng, almost half of China's 1.3 billion people live in rural areas. Despite government progress in reforming the healthcare sector, around 80% of health and medical services are concentrated in cities.

More money for health care is spent per capita on the urban population. Those in the countryside are at a significant disadvantage, says Professor John Cai, director of the Centre of Healthcare Management and Policy at the China Europe International Business School.

Farmer Zheng Yanliang
Zheng Yanliang works as a farmer in northern China
"We still lack a huge number of good, qualified physicians so most of the good doctors concentrate in the cities, in the big teaching hospitals," he said.

"So it really adds a lot of burden to this farmer if he cannot receive good care in his local area. He has to travel to the big cities, with added transport and hotel costs. That really make things worse."

Mr Zheng has since had an operation on his other leg, which was amputated above the knee after also becoming infected. The surgery was done at the provincial hospital in Baoding.

But he knows he will need more medical treatment and does not know how he will afford it.

China's government is well aware of the problems facing people like Mr Zheng.

It has promised to make the country's health care system more accessible and affordable. It wants hospitals to cut the price of expensive drugs, treatments and diagnostic tests which can bankrupt the poorest households.

Beijing's goal is to provide universal health care to the entire population, both urban and rural, by 2020.

But achieving that aim will be costly: health care spending is projected to triple by 2020, to one trillion dollars. And China must find the money to cover those costs.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#9
China poll fraud: top official Tong Mingqian sacked
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-25573707

Xi Jinping has demanded officials cut down on waste and extravagance

A senior Chinese official has been sacked in relation to a major electoral fraud scandal, the Communist Party's discipline watchdog said.

Tong Mingqian, a Hunan official, was negligent and failed to handle the cases of bribery, the watchdog said.

More than 500 lawmakers in Hunan resigned last week after it emerged they had accepted bribes to elect provincial parliament members.

President Xi Jinping has vowed to fight corruption in the Communist Party.

Tong Mingqian was party chief of Hengyang City in Hunan when the provincial elections took place. At the time of his dismissal, he was deputy head of Hunan's parliamentary advisory body.

Mr Tong "did not properly carry out his duties, and did not take timely and effective measures to investigate and handle cases of bribery exposed before and after the election", the watchdog said in a statement.

This led to "serious cases of bribery" that "inflicted significant damage to the interests of the party, country and the people", it added.

Investigations had revealed that 56 members of the Hunan People's Congress, the provincial parliament that rubber-stamps decisions, bribed lawmakers in Hengyang to elect them to their posts, state media reported earlier.

Municipal officials have the power to appoint representatives to the local People's Congress.

The 512 Hengyang officials, as well as the 56 provincial assembly members, all resigned or were dismissed, state media said.

File photo: Zhou Yongkang in 2007
Several officials linked to Zhou Yongkang (pictured) have come under investigation for corruption
Separately, a top political adviser and former aide to China's ex-security chief Zhou Yongkang was removed from his post for suspected corruption on Thursday, state media said.

Li Chongxi was chair of Sichuan province's Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference.

For months, there have been rumours and reports that Mr Zhou, one of China's top former leaders, is also being investigated for corruption, correspondents say.

Xi Jinping has warned that corruption could topple the Communist Party, and launched an anti-corruption campaign he said would target both "tigers and flies" - high and low-ranking officials in the government.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#10
I suppose this a bit of a Fortean touch.

China man in balloon bound for disputed islands crashes
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-25572890

A hot-air balloon drifting in the East China Sea near the disputed isles known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in a photo released 2 January 2014

The man launched the balloon from China's Fujian province in an attempt to land on one of the islands

A Chinese man flying a hot air balloon to a group of disputed islands had to be rescued after his balloon crashed, Japan's Coast Guard has said.

The man, who said he was a cook, was heading to an East China Sea island chain controlled by Japan, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China.

The man had been handed to a Chinese patrol ship, the coast guard said.

The islands are close to potential oil and gas reserves, and are a source of tension between the two countries.

The Japanese Coast Guard said they received a request to search for a missing person on Wednesday afternoon.

They found the man and the hot air balloon around 20km (12 miles) from the islands. The man was not hurt, reports said.

The 35-year-old launched the hot air balloon from Fujian province in an attempt to land on one of the disputed islands, officials said.

They said the man was in Japanese territorial waters, but decided against pursuing charges as they could not determine the exact place he had landed, Japan's Kyodo news agency reported.

One of the disputed islands, in an image released by the Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force on 15 September 2010
The islands are close to shipping lanes and potential oil and gas reserves
The islands have been a source of tension between China and Japan for decades.

In 2012, the Japanese government bought three of the islands from their Japanese owner, sparking mass protests in Chinese cities.

Since then, Chinese ships have repeatedly sailed in and out of what Japan says are its territorial waters.

In August 2012, Japanese police arrested 14 pro-China activists who sailed from Hong Kong to the islands, with some setting foot on one of the islands.

Sino-Japanese tensions have also been strained by China's newly-declared air-defence identification zone - which covers an area of the East China Sea, including the islands - and by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit in December to a shrine that honours war dead including convicted war criminals.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#12
China baby hatch suspended after hundreds abandoned
http://www.politics.ie/forum/current-af ... rk-16.html

File photo: Staff of local institute of children's welfare work inside a baby hatch in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, China, 11 December 2013

More than 20 baby hatches have been opened across China

A baby hatch in southern China has been forced to suspend work after hundreds of infants were abandoned, overwhelming the centre, its director says.

More than 260 children had been left at the welfare home in Guangzhou since 28 January, director Xu Jiu added.

Staff will continue caring for babies already at the welfare home, all of whom suffer from illnesses, Mr Xu said.

China introduced the centres so parents could abandon infants safely rather than leaving them in the streets.

Supporters say the baby hatches save lives, but critics say they encourage parents to abandon their children.

Mr Xu announced the suspension on Sunday, saying that 262 babies had been left at the centre since the scheme began in January.

"I hope everyone understands the difficulties the welfare centre faces," Mr Xu told Xinhua news agency.

"We are temporarily closing the centre [to new babies] so that we can properly care for the infants already at the centre."

File photo: A baby hatch in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, China 11 December 2013
Baby hatches generally contain an incubator, a delayed alarm device, an air conditioner and a baby bed
The centre, which also cares for orphans, has 1,000 beds.

However, it currently houses 1,121 babies and young people, with another 1,274 in the care of foster families, Guangzhou's Municipal Civil Affairs Bureau said.

All the abandoned infants had illnesses, such as cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and congenital heart disease, the bureau added.

It is thought that many parents abandon ill babies because they fear they cannot afford the medical care required.

Abandoning children is illegal in China. However, authorities believe that the hatches give the infants a better chance of survival than if they were left in the street.

A total of 25 baby hatches have been established in 10 provincial regions in China, Xinhua reports.

Under China's strict population control policies, most couples have only been allowed to have one child and there is a strong preference for healthy baby boys.

In December, China's top legislature formally adopted a resolution easing the one-child policy, allowing couples to have two children if either parent is an only child.

Provinces are now determining when to relax their restrictions at a local level, with some acting already.
 

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
5,395
Likes
67
Points
129
#13
Why are we so interested in the Infants of China?

They are no more curious than the infants of other nations?

Is it a cultural thing?
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#14
Its a thread about China. If similar stories emerge in other countries I'm sure they will be posted on an appropriate thread.
 

tastyintestines

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Messages
1,625
Likes
122
Points
94
#16
Maybe it is because they are humans. We are supposed to respect life. Otherwise you* would probably get beat down every time you left your abode.


edit
*you means humanity in this case. :D
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#17
China: Stop police violence against workers fighting for their rights

Since early 2015, the repression on labour rights defenders in mainland China has been escalating from forced eviction of labour NGO offices to systematic use of violence against workers' representatives. There were at least three cases of labour disputes in which police broke into the venues where workers were meeting. Police beat up and arbitrarily arrested staff of labour organisations and workers, and representatives who were detained compulsorily for 1 to 20 days under the charge of "sabotaging production and operation". Undocumented cases of labour activists who were detained or criminalized are innumerable. According to the IHLO (the Hong Kong Liaison Office of the international trade union movement), there are still at least 7 labour activists in prison, including those who were sentenced to either life or long-term imprisonment due to their alleged involvement in labour organizing in 1989. ...

http://www.labourstartcampaigns.net/show_campaign.cgi?c=2743
 

rynner2

Great Old One
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,256
Likes
8,918
Points
284
Location
Under the moon
#18
China and Taiwan leaders start historic meeting with handshake

The leaders of China and Taiwan are holding historic talks in Singapore - their first in more than 60 years.
Chinese President Xi Jinping and Taiwan's President Ma Ying-jeou shook hands at the start of the talks, which are seen as largely symbolic.

China views Taiwan as a breakaway province which will one day be reunited with the mainland.
But many Taiwanese see it as independent and are concerned at China's growing influence.
"Both sides should respect each other's values and way of life," Mr Ma said.
Mr Xi told the Taiwanese leader: "We are one family."

The meeting is taking place in a ballroom at a luxury hotel, on the sidelines of a state visit by Mr Xi to Singapore. The talks will be followed by a news conference and then dinner.
Relations between China and Taiwan have improved under Mr Ma since he took office in 2008, with better economic ties, improving tourism links, and a trade pact signed.

The two sides split in 1949 when the Kuomintang lost to the Chinese Communist Party in the civil war and set up a new government in Taiwan.

No major agreements or deals are expected to be reached, and Mr Ma added that the issue of the South China Sea disputes, which has dominated recent concerns in the region, would not be brought up.

Mr Xi raised the issue in a speech at the National University of Singapore before the meeting, saying China has always hoped to settle the disputes peacefully.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-34742680
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#19
Concern for China human rights lawyers
9 December 2015
Last updated at 22:44 GMT

Thursday is United Nations Human Rights Day but not everywhere is it celebrated with equal enthusiasm.

China has the biggest population in the world and a constitutional commitment to freedoms of speech, press and assembly, but it is often the target for international criticism over human rights.

This year has seen a new concern - a crackdown on human rights lawyers which has raised questions not just about China's protection of human rights but even about the right to protect those rights.

BBC China editor Carrie Gracie reports from Beijing.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-35051684

Vid at link.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#20
A man in Sichuan killed himself by jumping in a river. When his parents went to identify the body, fishermen asked 180,000 RMB for dredging it up, but eventually negotiated down to 8000 RMB. However, his parents couldn’t pay the fee, so they had to just let the corpse swell. Three days later the civil police coordinated with both sides, and the fee was set at 5400 RMB, so the body was pulled out and dragged ashore. The boy’s father said that the money was all lent from relatives

http://www.chinasmack.com/2015/digest/dead-boy-fished-out-of-river-for-a-fee.html
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#22
Miss World Canada on being denied visa after criticising China human rights record

The Miss World pageant takes place in China today without the Canadian contestant.

Anastasia Lin, who was born in China, was crowned Miss World Canada in May. She later appeared before the US Congress where she criticised China's human rights record. She was then denied a Chinese visa.

She told Today about the sensitive issues she brought up at the US Congress.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35141248

Vid at link.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#23
On 29 August 2015, the World Uyghur Congress (WUC) released a statement expressing deep concern for the 45 Uyghurs recently arrested in East Turkestan. The Chinese authorities claimed that the detained individuals were involved in "organising, leading or participating in terrorist groups, funding terrorist groups and organising others to cross the border illegally". Newly adopted Chinese legislation – especially the counter-terrorism act – has given Beijing the necessary tools to arrest and charge virtually anyone without the need to respect standard legal procedures. In its statement, the WUC calls on the international community, including NGOs, States and other bodies to exert pressure on the Chinese leadership to cease its crackdown on minorities.

Below is a statement published by The World Uyghur Congress (WUC)

The World Uyghur Congress (WUC) expresses its deep concern for the 45 Uyghurs who were recently charged in East Turkestan for illegal border crossings. Trials like these are often conducted in secret without adequate due process with the state merely publicizing the outcome following the sentencing procedure. We therefore call on the Chinese government to act fairly and transparently, and to reveal credible evidence ostensibly supporting these charges.

Courts across the region, in ten separate cases, convicted Uyghurs on charges of “organizing, leading and participating in terror organizations”. Many of the charges made typical claims that those attempting to leave the country were escaping for the purpose of joining international terror networks – a claim that has yet to be substantiated, but acts as a convenient justification for its continued harsh response. Despite insisting that the courts have zero tolerance for crimes relating to terrorism, the same courts failed to disclose how those sentenced were connected with real terror operations. ...

http://unpo.org/article/18519
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#24
In defense of Zeng Feiyang: a critique of the smear campaign

On Dec. 22, Chinese state media launched a smear campaign against Zeng, one of the seven labor rights activists criminally detained in a sweep of four worker-support organizations and at least 40 affiliated individuals since Deccember 3. The state has yet to confirm Zeng's whereabouts or criminal charges, but he may be charged with "inciting the subversion of state power," which could result in 15 years in prison.

Translated by "Solidarity with Chinese Workers" from 好一桶脏水好一把谎言 ——评《揭开“工运之星”光环的背后--“番禺打工族文书处理服务部”主任曾飞洋等人涉嫌严重犯罪案件调查》by 吴枯荣, originally posted on December 23 on a WeChat account that is now blocked, reposted here.

For more on the smear campaign in English, see State media accuses detained labour activists of litany of offences (SCMP) and China Details Accusations Against Detained Labor Activists (WSJ). The article translated below addresses only the Xinhua News article published on December 22. On December 23, Central Chinese TV aired an even more sensational and slanderous report, and similar reports have been published since then. The fact that the state is launching this smear campaign and making a public spectacle of this crackdown, rather than quietly disappearing these activists, is something we will address in our own forthcoming statement.

For updates on the status of the Guangdong Seven and the campaign to free them, follow the Facebook page “Free Chinese labour activists now 馬上釋放中國勞權人士”, and sign the petition here (in multiple languages). For more information in English, see other translations and writings being compiled on Libcom under the tag “Solidarity with Chinese Workers”.
-
After labor activists Zeng Feiyang, He Xiaobo and others had been detained for three weeks, Xinhua News published an article titled “Revealing the truth behind ‘the star of labor movement’: investigation against the criminal suspects Zeng Feiyang, head of ‘Panyu migrant worker service group’, and others” . This article was immediately reposted on many major websites. As a former labor NGO staff who only recently left the job, I was deeply shocked by the vicious way of writing, the low means of smearing and the fallacious logic behind the article.

While the case of these labor NGO staff are still under investigation, the Xinhua news is already jumping out to reveal behind the scenes story of those involved, exposing scandals, and listing their crimes. Methods like these have been often used when repressing “public intellectuals” and “rights-defence lawyers”. This is of great importance. Of course, media has the right to speech. Putting the motive of this article aside, this article will focus on the specific content of this article.

Small problem, big article

First, we need to clarify the obvious facts: ever since December 3rd, the labor rights-defence people have been subpoenaed and arrested for various reasons by the local police, and finally seven have been arrested respectively under the charge of “assembling crowds to disrupt social order " and "embezzling." These seven are: Zeng Feiyang, Zhu Xiaomei, Meng Han, and Tang Beiguo (supposedly the “Tang Huanxing” in the article, who left the job on May 30th, no longer the staff of Dagongzu) of “Panyu Dagongzu Service Center”, the volunteer Deng Xiaoming of “Haige Service Center”, He Xiaobo of “Foshan Nanfeiyang Social Work Service Center” and Peng Jiayong of “Labor Mutual-Aid Center”.

http://libcom.org/news/defense-zeng-feiyang-critique-smear-campaign-25122015
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#25
Hong Kong unsettled by case of 5 missing booksellers

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong pro-democracy lawmakers said Sunday that they will press the government for answers after a fifth employee of a publishing company specializing in books critical of mainland China's leadership went missing.

Lawmaker Albert Ho said the city was "shocked and appalled" by the disappearance of Lee Bo. Like the four others who have disappeared in recent months, Lee is associated with publisher Mighty Current.

While there's been no official word on what happened to the five missing people, Ho told reporters that it appears their disappearances are linked to the publishing company's books.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap...settled-strange-case-missing-booksellers.html
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#26
Women at a business in Changchun city, Jilin Province, are now required to tell bosses a year in advance that they plan on having a baby, according to the state-run New Culture newspaper. The report, which has been widely shared in official nationwide media, says managers at the unnamed firm hope that making a "timetable" for maternity leave will prevent short-staffing. It does not say whether bosses can refuse requests.

The company's HR director says China's new two-child policy has left them "helpless" in the face of a baby boom. "Some employees said that they wanted to take advantage this policy and have another child," Ms Zheng tells the paper. "We have to consider the overall interests of the enterprise." The company's boss adds that hiring staff to cover maternity leave has proved "impossible" because of the economic downturn, leaving colleagues overstretched.

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-35233717
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#27
A hospital in China has been bulldozed while still in use, reportedly causing doctors inside to flee and burying six bodies from its morgue under rubble, state media say.

The Number Four Hospital of Zhengzhou University in Henan province was partially demolished on Thursday amid a land dispute, Xinhua news agency said.

Hospital staff told reporters equipment worth over $600,000 was damaged.

The case has sparked outrage in China, where forced demolitions are common.

Doctors told local media that several men in camouflage uniforms showed up at the hospital, in Huiji district, on Thursday, and began bulldozing the building.

Liu Chunguang, director of the hospital's radiology department, told Xinhua news agency he was examining a patient when the demolition took place.

"A gaping hole appeared - the patient was half-scared to death, and ran out."

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-35262802?ocid=socialflow_twitter
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#28
Vietnamese fishermen say they are being attacked by China with increasing regularity. Their boats have been rammed, equipment broken and crewmen beaten up. Vietnam accuses Beijing of trying to force them out of waters in the South China Sea where their families have fished for generations.

As the breaking dawn casts a red-orange rim around the horizon of the South China Sea, Vo Van Giau kneels on the front deck of the fishing boat and locks his hands behind his head.

"That is what they made me do," he says, pushing his head hard down. "Then they beat me with steel rods and a hammer like this." He pulls a heavy wooden mallet from a bundle of fishing equipment and strikes himself softly on his shoulders and against his sides.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-35234183
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,100
Likes
19,585
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#30
The Chinese state has dramatically escalated repression against workers organizations.

by Solidarity With Chinese Workers' Struggle

On December 3, four workers organizations in the southern manufacturing hubs of Guangzhou and Foshan came under attack from Chinese authorities. Dozens of staff, family members, and affiliated workers were questioned, and seven remained in custody for over a month. Four have now been formally charged: three of them for “assembling a crowd to disrupt social order” and one for “embezzlement.”

Little more is known about the detainees. While a group of sixty lawyers volunteered to represent the activists, they’ve been barred from meeting their potential clients. In the meantime, the state media has unleashed a harsh smear campaign aimed at destroying the activists’ personal and professional reputations and legitimating the crackdown.

The crackdown didn’t come from nowhere. Labor groups and activists in China are regularly subjected to state repression and harassment. What sets the current sweep apart are the number of workers organizations (or labor NGOs, as some call them) and individuals targeted, and the severity of the criminal charges they are facing. The Chinese state’s goal is to stifle these and other workers organizations through humiliation and fear.

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2016/01/...c&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=socialnetwork
 
Top