Non-Fortean Films

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1917: The trenches are narrow but crowded, some soldiers on one side waiting to go over the top, some crouched on the other side, eating, smoking, crying, in shock, petting a terrier. When you're moving fast through a trench system tempers are short when you bump into troopers, they are likely bereaved of friends, seeing their mates lose limbs. Blake (Dean Charles Chapman) and Schofield (George MacKay) are on a mission to inform two isolated battalions of the Devonshires to call off an attack due the next morning, the Devons will be advancing into a trap. The stakes are higher for Blake, his brother is in one of the battalions. The messengers cross no mans land, bodies caught on the barbed wire, rats gnawing on corpses, dodging snipers, booby-traps once they reach the abandoned German trenches. Watching an aerial dogfight. This is truly a journey into the heart of darkness for Blake and Schofield.

Wonderfully filmed by Roger Deakins in subdued colours with shades of brown, tan, green and khaki predominating as the soldiers progress through the mud and fields. Also some great scenes underground and in shelled out buildings lit by flares. The script is spare but gripping as not just MacKay and Chapman put in great performances; there are also great supporting turns by Mark Strong, Colin Firth , Nabhaan Rizwan and Benedict Cumberbatch. Director/Writer Sam Mendes delivers a film which will remain in your memory long after the final credits roll. 9/10.
 

Yithian

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Although I possesed the background awareness that Twentieth Century Fox and Fox News were connected (despite the former being very much older than the latter), I never really associated them with each other and my divergent feelings towards the two brands sat comfortably alongside each other.

Am I irregular in this?

Anyway, Disney is binning the Fox name for films (though retaining some of the imagery):

https://variety.com/2020/film/news/disney-dropping-fox-20th-century-studios-1203470349/
 

GNC

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Although I possesed the background awareness that Twentieth Century Fox and Fox News were connected (despite the former being very much older than the latter), I never really associated them with each other and my divergent feelings towards the two brands sat comfortably alongside each other.

Am I irregular in this?

Anyway, Disney is binning the Fox name for films (though retaining some of the imagery):

https://variety.com/2020/film/news/disney-dropping-fox-20th-century-studios-1203470349/
I imagine it's because the Fox name is still owned by Murdoch's mob for their "news" outlets, and Disney prefer to be non-political, or less political anyway.
 
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Bombshell: The story of the women who brought down Roger Alies, head of Fox News. John Lithgow is virtually unrecognisable as the obese Alies but portrays him with creepy gusto. Sadly Malcolm McDowell only has a cameo as Rupert Murdoch but makes those minutes count, Alies was dispensable if the Fox News money generator was to survive. The real star is Nicole Kidman as Gretchen Carlson who fed up with humiliation decides to sue Alies for sexual harassment, she knew what she was getting into and the travails she suffered during the fight are vividly portrayed. Charlzie Theron plays Megyn Kelly who has a run in with Trump and suffers a year of abuse from him and his supporters, the effect it has on her and her family will scorch your heart. But that heart will gladden when she joins in with Carlson. Margot Robbie and Kate McKinnon are both great in supporting roles. Jay Roach directs from a script by Charles Randolph and delivers a gripping drama. 8/10.
 
Joined
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Eblana
1917: The trenches are narrow but crowded, some soldiers on one side waiting to go over the top, some crouched on the other side, eating, smoking, crying, in shock, petting a terrier. When you're moving fast through a trench system tempers are short when you bump into troopers, they are likely bereaved of friends, seeing their mates lose limbs. Blake (Dean Charles Chapman) and Schofield (George MacKay) are on a mission to inform two isolated battalions of the Devonshires to call off an attack due the next morning, the Devons will be advancing into a trap. The stakes are higher for Blake, his brother is in one of the battalions. The messengers cross no mans land, bodies caught on the barbed wire, rats gnawing on corpses, dodging snipers, booby-traps once they reach the abandoned German trenches. Watching an aerial dogfight. This is truly a journey into the heart of darkness for Blake and Schofield.

Wonderfully filmed by Roger Deakins in subdued colours with shades of brown, tan, green and khaki predominating as the soldiers progress through the mud and fields. Also some great scenes underground and in shelled out buildings lit by flares. The script is spare but gripping as not just MacKay and Chapman put in great performances; there are also great supporting turns by Mark Strong, Colin Firth , Nabhaan Rizwan and Benedict Cumberbatch. Director/Writer Sam Mendes delivers a film which will remain in your memory long after the final credits roll. 9/10.
Sigh. Lawrence Fox is really Mr Angry these days.

https://twitter.com/juliamacfarlane
Julia Macfarlane @juliamacfarlane

Sikhs fought alongside British forces in the War. Here is a picture from 1913 of the 2nd Sikh Royal Infantry, and of Sikhs marching in France. More than 80,000 Sikhs died fighting for Britain. But Lawrence Fox is angry that 1917 showed Sikhs in the army: https://dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7910667/Laurence-Fox-slams-Oscar-winning-director-Sam-Mendes-incongruous-Sikh-soldier-1917.html…





11:40 AM · Jan 21, 2020·Twitter Web App
 
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