Not As Environmentally Friendly As Promised

maximus otter

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California electric car owners are told NOT to charge their vehicles because of heatwave - just days after announcing 2035 ban on gas cars


Californians are being advised not to charge their electric cars during certain hours as a 90-degree heatwave rolls in.

The move comes just weeks after the California Air Resources Board voted to ban gas-powered vehicles by 2035.

The California Independent System Operator (ISO) has called for residents across the state to 'reduce' energy usage between 4 and 9pm 'when the system is the most stressed because demand for electricity remains high.'

Starting on Wednesday and running until Tuesday, residents are being asked to not charge their electric vehicles between those hours, set their thermostats at 78 degrees or higher, avoid using large appliances, and turn off unnecessary lights.

'Lowering electricity use during that time will ease [the] strain on the system, and prevent more drastic measures, including rotating power outages,' the bulletin said.

California has officially become the first in the world to enforce a ban on the sale of new gasoline cars by 2035.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ge-electric-cars-just-weeks-ban-gas-cars.html

Electric car owners:
iu


maximus otter
 

Trevp666

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Mythopoeika

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California electric car owners are told NOT to charge their vehicles because of heatwave - just days after announcing 2035 ban on gas cars


Californians are being advised not to charge their electric cars during certain hours as a 90-degree heatwave rolls in.

The move comes just weeks after the California Air Resources Board voted to ban gas-powered vehicles by 2035.

The California Independent System Operator (ISO) has called for residents across the state to 'reduce' energy usage between 4 and 9pm 'when the system is the most stressed because demand for electricity remains high.'

Starting on Wednesday and running until Tuesday, residents are being asked to not charge their electric vehicles between those hours, set their thermostats at 78 degrees or higher, avoid using large appliances, and turn off unnecessary lights.

'Lowering electricity use during that time will ease [the] strain on the system, and prevent more drastic measures, including rotating power outages,' the bulletin said.

California has officially become the first in the world to enforce a ban on the sale of new gasoline cars by 2035.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ge-electric-cars-just-weeks-ban-gas-cars.html

Electric car owners:
iu


maximus otter
Can Californians walk to work in 90-degree heat? The world wants to know!
 

Coal

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https://jalopnik.com/making-batteries-for-all-these-evs-will-require-over-30-1849532003

Making Batteries for All These EVs Will Require Over 300 New Mines​

Satisfying global demand for lithium, cobalt, nickel and graphite will literally take hundreds of new mines by 2035

Major carmakers seem to agree that EVs are the next step for the industry, but a lack of raw materials is going to be the next hurdle the industry must overcome.

Demand for raw materials and the metals used to make EV batteries such as graphite, lithium, cobalt and nickel is already outpacing supply. According to Benchmark analysts, unless 384 new mines are up and running in the next ten years, the EV transition will be indefinitely transitional as carmakers struggle to source battery metals.
etc....
 

Sid

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Think of all that pollution. But, it's 'green' pollution... so no worries...
There will always be those alternatives people could turn to, like... say erm, feet propulsion - rubber bands - springs - steam - pushing etc! Very green indeed! :)
 

Mythopoeika

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There will always be those alternatives people could turn to, like... say erm, feet propulsion - rubber bands - springs - steam - pushing etc! Very green indeed! :)
Steam means burning coal. Not allowed in this new world that we have created for ourselves.
 

Coal

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Steam means burning coal. Not allowed in this new world that we have created for ourselves.
Anything combustible might be used, model stream engines use other spirits to heat the water. No reason why a steam engine couldn't be run using 'some other' heat source to create the steam. So one might convert a steam locomotive to run from natural gas, at least in theory.

You could conceivably use a nuclear reactor to run a steam engine...or as we call them 'nuclear power stations'.
 

Cochise

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Anything combustible might be used, model stream engines use other spirits to heat the water. No reason why a steam engine couldn't be run using 'some other' heat source to create the steam. So one might convert a steam locomotive to run from natural gas, at least in theory.

You could conceivably use a nuclear reactor to run a steam engine...or as we call them 'nuclear power stations'.
There were designs for nuclear railway locomotives floating around in the 50's/60's.

You can run steam engines on alcohol. It's a terrible waste mind :) Also wood - I mean, if biofuel is 'green' then presumably wood fired steam engines would be too.
 

Xanatic*

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Ethanol burns cleaner than coal/wood though. Woodfired stoves are linked to respiratory problems.
 

Trevp666

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For 'biofuel' just read 'trees'.
The use of different words to camouflage the reality of things is common in the fields of eco-zealotry and 'the powers that be'.
Basically, here in the UK, the majority of 'biofuel' is the stuff burned at 'Drax' power station (https://www.drax.com/)
What their own website tells us in rather grandiose language is that "Trees in the US get cut down, chopped up, dried out, pelletised and shipped to the UK (a process which uses masses of power but lets just ignore that) where they are burned in a power plant"
Which apparently is better than just digging coal out of the ground here and burning it.
https://www.drax.com/sustainable-bioenergy/what-is-a-biomass-wood-pellet/
 

Mythopoeika

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For 'biofuel' just read 'trees'.
The use of different words to camouflage the reality of things is common in the fields of eco-zealotry and 'the powers that be'.
Basically, here in the UK, the majority of 'biofuel' is the stuff burned at 'Drax' power station (https://www.drax.com/)
What their own website tells us in rather grandiose language is that "Trees in the US get cut down, chopped up, dried out, pelletised and shipped to the UK (a process which uses masses of power but lets just ignore that) where they are burned in a power plant"
Which apparently is better than just digging coal out of the ground here and burning it.
https://www.drax.com/sustainable-bioenergy/what-is-a-biomass-wood-pellet/
Yes. Biofuel is not green.
 

Coal

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For 'biofuel' just read 'trees'.
The use of different words to camouflage the reality of things is common in the fields of eco-zealotry and 'the powers that be'.
Basically, here in the UK, the majority of 'biofuel' is the stuff burned at 'Drax' power station (https://www.drax.com/)
What their own website tells us in rather grandiose language is that "Trees in the US get cut down, chopped up, dried out, pelletised and shipped to the UK (a process which uses masses of power but lets just ignore that) where they are burned in a power plant"
Which apparently is better than just digging coal out of the ground here and burning it.
https://www.drax.com/sustainable-bioenergy/what-is-a-biomass-wood-pellet/
They've also gobbled up a considerable sum of money in subsidies to convert the plant to do so.
 

Mythopoeika

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Which is why, following BBC protocol, I put 'green' in single quotes. :)

I find it hard to see how wood stoves are going to give you respiratory problems unless you have defective chimneys or ventilation.
There's nothing wrong with using wood stoves in a rural area, as long as people can get access to dead trees, fallen branches etc. If it means felling trees en-masse, then it's no longer green. This is the reason why Britain went over to burning coal back in history - we ran out of trees, pretty much.
I think we Brits will at some point go back to burning coal - at home, and in some power stations. This will allow us to plant more trees and re-establish the forests. Clean-burn tech is now available for power stations, but the green lobby won't let us use it.
 

Cochise

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There's nothing wrong with using wood stoves in a rural area, as long as people can get access to dead trees, fallen branches etc. If it means felling trees en-masse, then it's no longer green. This is the reason why Britain went over to burning coal back in history - we ran out of trees, pretty much.
I think we Brits will at some point go back to burning coal - at home, and in some power stations. This will allow us to plant more trees and re-establish the forests. Clean-burn tech is now available for power stations, but the green lobby won't let us use it.
It's still true that there is a huge amount of coal under and nearby the British Isles, and modern mining methods would make retrieving it much less dangerous.

If we listen to the government we aren't allowed to burn our own darn trees (those of us fortunate enough to have some). In fact I burn anything to hand, as did the previous owners and my neighbours. I don't chop down any trees though - pruning, dead and fallen stuff yes.

As a matter of interest my neighbour inherited a hideous overgrown leylandii hedge planted by the previous owner (and completely inappropriate for the area). He chopped it down, and then discovered that leylandii wood won't burn, even after being left for a couple of years. Even if you douse the darn stuff in petrol it just smoulders.
 
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Mythopoeika

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It's still true that there is a huge amount of coal under and nearby the british Isles, and modern mining methods would make retrieving it much less dangerous.
It would last for a long time, perhaps long enough for us to develop nuclear fusion-based power generation.
It seems just wrong to stop using it, now that carbon sequestration methods are available.
I guess the only downside is disposal of all that ash. Most of it could be put back into the mines, and some of it could be used to make fertiliser.
 

Cochise

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It would last for a long time, perhaps long enough for us to develop nuclear fusion-based power generation.
It seems just wrong to stop using it, now that carbon sequestration methods are available.
I guess the only downside is disposal of all that ash. Most of it could be put back into the mines, and some of it could be used to make fertiliser.
Ash is actually quite useful stuff. You can make bricks out of it, surface minor roads with it, use it as infill, use it as insulation in cavity walls, etc. etc.
 

Mythopoeika

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Ash is actually quite useful stuff. You can make bricks out of it, surface minor roads with it, use it as infill, use it as insulation in cavity walls, etc. etc.
It's also useful for gritting roads in the snowy season. My Dad used to chuck it on the pavement when it snowed. It ensured that the postman wouldn't fall over when coming down the drive.
He also chucked it all over the garden, which gradually changed the Ph balance of the soil from quite acidic to neutral.
 

Trevp666

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From this site - https://euracoal.eu/info/country-profiles/united-kingdom/

Coal consumption in 2018 was 11.9 million tonnes, of which 6.7 million tonnes were used for electricity generation, with the iron and steel industry being another large consumer. The residential heating market is now less than 0.5 million tonnes per year. Overall coal consumption has fallen by 75% since 2014, mainly as a result of government policies.

The UK has identified hard coal resources of 3 910 million tonnes, although total resources could be as large as 187 billion tonnes. There are 33 million tonnes of economically recoverable reserves available at operational and permitted mines, plus a further 344 million tonnes at mines in planning. There are also about 1 000 million tonnes of lignite resources, mainly in Northern Ireland, although no lignite is mined. This significant coal resource base is, however, rendered largely irrelevant by policies designed to drive coal out of the energy mix and a hostile planning environment for surface mines.

So..........my back-of-an-envelope calculation means that (at 2018 usage figures) we have about 3 years worth of economically recoverable coal reserves available at operational and permitted mines.
Another 30 odd years worth at mines 'in planning'.
And about another....er.....300+ years worth of 'identified' resources, but possibly much, much more.

And that's just the coal. The reserves of oil, 'natural gas' and shale gas under UK areas is incredibly vast on an almost unimaginable scale.
The eco-zealots would have us believe that it is about to run out, but actually no, there's loads of the stuff.
 

Mythopoeika

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From this site - https://euracoal.eu/info/country-profiles/united-kingdom/

Coal consumption in 2018 was 11.9 million tonnes, of which 6.7 million tonnes were used for electricity generation, with the iron and steel industry being another large consumer. The residential heating market is now less than 0.5 million tonnes per year. Overall coal consumption has fallen by 75% since 2014, mainly as a result of government policies.

The UK has identified hard coal resources of 3 910 million tonnes, although total resources could be as large as 187 billion tonnes. There are 33 million tonnes of economically recoverable reserves available at operational and permitted mines, plus a further 344 million tonnes at mines in planning. There are also about 1 000 million tonnes of lignite resources, mainly in Northern Ireland, although no lignite is mined. This significant coal resource base is, however, rendered largely irrelevant by policies designed to drive coal out of the energy mix and a hostile planning environment for surface mines.

So..........my back-of-an-envelope calculation means that (at 2018 usage figures) we have about 3 years worth of economically recoverable coal reserves available at operational and permitted mines.
Another 30 odd years worth at mines 'in planning'.
And about another....er.....300+ years worth of 'identified' resources, but possibly much, much more.

And that's just the coal. The reserves of oil, 'natural gas' and shale gas under UK areas is incredibly vast on an almost unimaginable scale.
The eco-zealots would have us believe that it is about to run out, but actually no, there's loads of the stuff.
The UK is practically an island of coal. There is enough to keep us going for a looong time.
 

kesavaross

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The UK is practically an island of coal. There is enough to keep us going for a looong time.
That's not how these people work. We are now in a period of time where having a shortage of everything matters.

It's like the water companies in the UK. If it rains a lot, do the bare legal minimum to repair the leaks. If there's a drought, declare a hosepipe ban or as they did during the summer of 76, introduce stand pipes. It's a win win situation for the directors and share holders.

With the natural resources needed in society, create a shortage and pump out the fear factor based on 'green' issues, then put the prices up based on the created shortage.
 
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