Odd Sayings

PeteS

Seeking refuge
Joined
Dec 5, 2016
Messages
1,314
Reaction score
3,057
Points
154
Got to admit I just don't get this one.

In 'Last of the Summer Wine' Marina refers to Norman Clegg as 'Norman Clegg that was'.

As he is stood there, and clearly still is Norman Clegg, why does she use this ?
It's just a joke INT, Marina remembering him as he was before he got married.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
Staff member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
11,735
Reaction score
13,106
Points
284
Location
An Eochair
Got to admit I just don't get this one.

In 'Last of the Summer Wine' Marina refers to Norman Clegg as 'Norman Clegg that was'.

As he is stood there, and clearly still is Norman Clegg, why does she use this ?

That's what's funny. She is using the phrase that applies to females and he's a chap.
 

Dick Turpin

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
417
Reaction score
1,867
Points
134
Not so much an odd saying, but one that was heard often in my childhood home, especially when my Father was asked to do any chore by my Mother.

“I’M GOING UP THE PUB” he would cry at the top of his voice.

He would as well.

Obviously, being asked to close a cupboard door, or asked to turn the volume down of his Frank Sinatra LP was classed as a chore in 1970’s Britain.

The silly old sod
 

tuco

Spitting in a wishing well
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
540
Reaction score
2,009
Points
133
Location
south of south
My father would call any sauce, ketchup or gravy 'jippo' , I have never heard anyone else use this expression.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
16,391
Reaction score
21,392
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds

tuco

Spitting in a wishing well
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
540
Reaction score
2,009
Points
133
Location
south of south

ravensocks

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
168
Reaction score
281
Points
69
I was watching a YouTube computer channel (Explaining Computers) and the subject was ways of applying an instruction.
The guy doing the video said 'There is more than one way to cook a cat'.

But we always said 'there is more than one way to skin a cat'.

Which one do you recognize as being the norm ?
It wouldn't be a comedy saying mash up, would it? A la 'the world's your lobster'.

I sometimes say thats a whole different bucket of kittens for kettles of fish- but it's just this moment dawned on me how unpleasant that actually is, especially when considering horror stories of what happens to unwanted kittens. I never made the connection, and being a cat lover had no desire to. How strange :(
 

Ermintruder

Delineated by a professional cryptozoologist
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,706
Reaction score
8,119
Points
284
Do any other forum members use the curious word "glom", in the sense of 'to obtain via unofficial means'? (well, very-nearly stealing).

It's become rather rare, recently. I >sometimes< utilised the word years ago, but often used to hear it in certain settings...on consideration, perhaps I haven't heard it used so far this millennium.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
16,391
Reaction score
21,392
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
Do any other forum members use the curious word "glom", in the sense of 'to obtain via unofficial means'? (well, very-nearly stealing).
It's become rather rare, recently. I >sometimes< utilised the word years ago, but often used to hear it in certain settings...on consideration, perhaps I haven't heard it used so far this millennium.
I don't think I'd ever heard "glom" used in the traditional explicit meaning of "snatch" or "steal."

I used to hear it invoked in a more figurative sense along the lines of "copy" / "adopt" / "take for one's own."

It is this second, more figurative, sense that I always associated with the phrase "glom onto" (e.g., "to accept or adopt an idea or concept").

More often and more recently I (rarely but usually) hear it used in an entirely different sense to imply "mutually adhering" or "coalescing as a single mass from separate bits" - always phrased as "glom together."

This third sense may be an Americanism. I always presumed this usage derived separately from (e.g.) "agglomerate."
 

Mungoman

Mostly harmless...
Joined
Feb 25, 2010
Messages
2,494
Reaction score
4,067
Points
169
Location
In the Bush (Peak Hill, NSW)
“Hopping the wag” – which I always believed to be a London expression, and which the old man accused me of many times as a lad when bunking off school.

The old Man – you been hopping the wag again boy
A young me – No Dad
The old Man - You sure..?
Me – Yeah ‘course Dad
The old Man – Then ‘ow comes you can get up to a 103 break at snooker, you’re only 13 for Christ’s sake.
A young me – Erm.

It’s because I spent most of my teenage years hopping the wag in the local snooker hall, when I should have been in class :D

We said 'Wagging it' down here in the antipodes.

Which, once again, speaks volumes to me...
 
Top