Old Languages, New Countries

Bad Bungle

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#92
I know I'm responding to an old message here. I'm a Manx learner, the language is alive and doing reasonably well. It's the healthiest it's been in nearly a century, whether the Manx being taught now would be recognizable to Ned Maddrell et al. is another matter of course.
I
I was given the Guinness Book of Records in 1976 and I remember Ned Maddrell being in it as the last native Manx speaker. The plan was to take as much tape recording as possible and introduce kids to the language to keep it alive. So glad that seems to have happened.

Cornish (Kernow) on the other hand is dead in the water. I recall four distinct Societies applied for Regional funding to resurrect the language about 10 years ago or more. None of the groups agreed on spelling or pronunciation.
 

Jepra Peld

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#93
I was given the Guinness Book of Records in 1976 and I remember Ned Maddrell being in it as the last native Manx speaker. The plan was to take as much tape recording as possible and introduce kids to the language to keep it alive. So glad that seems to have happened.

Cornish (Kernow) on the other hand is dead in the water. I recall four distinct Societies applied for Regional funding to resurrect the language about 10 years ago or more. None of the groups agreed on spelling or pronunciation.
Sadly one of those instrumental in the revival of the Manx language, Dr Brian Stowell, died yesterday.

https://www.manxradio.com/news/isle-of-man-news/loss-of-giant-of-manx-language-revival/
 
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