Old-School Cool

Ulalume

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Didn't you once think he was a Canadian? For a while after that I imagined all of his posts in a Geddy Lee voice.
I'm hoping you mean Lee's speaking voice and not his high pitched shriek. :p
But I've noticed all the Scottish folks on here tend to "sound" more Canadian to me than the English do. This is probably because I automatically overlay a North American accent onto written words and so Scots come out as more Canadian in their cadence. It's nigh impossible for me to imagine every variety of British accent and guess who has what. :oops:
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
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The estranged wife (Barbara Hershey) is depicted as shit-scared that her ex-husband is about to try something dangerous and she is proved to be correct. The hero is Robert Duvall's cliché one day away from retirement cop who reacts to the same crap day with humour and understanding (apart from the bit where he punches someone so we know he's not a total wimp, thanks Hollywood). D-FENS flatters us by thinking he's tackling modern issues, but the twist is that all he cares about is his own whingeing self. He's not the hero.
You clearly know/remember the film better than me--I stand corrected.

Perhaps I'm conflating it in my memory with another movie, but I'd thought that when the police ask the estranged wife why she and D-Fens split up she gives some weak or selfish response.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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You clearly know/remember the film better than me--I stand corrected.

Perhaps I'm conflating it in my memory with another movie, but I'd thought that when the police ask the estranged wife why she and D-Fens split up she gives some weak or selfish response.
I felt a certain amount of sympathy with the D-Fens character. All the way through the film, people are being horrible to him - they all want something from him, and the bottom's just fallen out of his world.
 

GNC

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Well, I can tell you I wish I looked like Gotham's Riddler, he's a handsome chap, and thin too. I don't have a handlebar moustache either, or sound like Geddy Lee, if you've ever seen the movie Stargate, imagine James Spader in that but fatter, that's what I look like. Maybe a bit more ginger. As to what I sound like, sort of an unintelligible Scottish mumble.
 

GNC

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You clearly know/remember the film better than me--I stand corrected.

Perhaps I'm conflating it in my memory with another movie, but I'd thought that when the police ask the estranged wife why she and D-Fens split up she gives some weak or selfish response.
It was because she was scared of him, I seem to recall, and those fears are shown to be justified. I'm not saying it's not possible to have sympathy with him, but he's an antihero at best.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Not just 'easy listening', it's 'cheesy listening'.
On Radio 4, I just heard Andy Hamilton laying into Sing Something Simple. He described it as music only suited to the website of Dignitas! :clap:

I worry, in case there is an age you grow into it: I am about the age my father was when he started listening to it. He had bereavement as an excuse - of sorts! :cool:
 
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David Plankton

I saw and photographed Loch Ness in 1995.
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In Morecambe market the other week I noticed a stall selling Harrington Jackets for £20. I quite fancy one for when we go out. Takes me back to Ska in the earlyu '80's.
I wore them for school in the early 80's. I didn't realise how cool they were at the time, my mother bought all my clothes for me. She was a bit of a Mod back in the day. Later she was the one to suggest I wear desert boots and Ben Sherman shirts. I still wear desert boots.

Wikipedia - Harrington Jacket.
 

Hild und hjalmi

The fantasy-loving singing Valkyrie
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Eugene O'Neill in 1918 (on the left), in a scene from his own play Bound East For Cardiff, part of the Glencairn cycle which was filmed by John Ford twenty-two years later as a movie called The Long Voyage Home.


 
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JamesWhitehead

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Cock Door!

It really is called that on the sleeve. It's meant to be Le Coq d'Or by Rimsky-Korsakov.

Turned into an anagram of Cock Odor. How very fitting!

Yes, it's The Mike Sammes Singers with more of their doo-be-doo-be-doo stuff. In stereo! :horr:
 

dreeness .

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I'm hoping you mean Lee's speaking voice and not his high pitched shriek. :p
But I've noticed all the Scottish folks on here tend to "sound" more Canadian to me than the English do. This is probably because I automatically overlay a North American accent onto written words and so Scots come out as more Canadian in their cadence. It's nigh impossible for me to imagine every variety of British accent and guess who has what. :oops:
Here is an alleged comedian performing a coarse caricature of my kind of accent.

 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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It looks a bit 'Jetsons'. The woman's foot is just about to be chopped off.
That's the Simplicity Wonder Boy X-100. It was unveiled 60 years ago (October? 1957) as a 'concept' piece. I don't know that the concept ever made it into production.
 

Krepostnoi

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It seems that it did.

Wasn't expecting to see that fine piece of Soviet time-travel drama "Guests from the Future" in this context, although it is certainly on-topic for old-school cool. That's not the best rendition of the theme song, which can be properly shivers-down-the-spine: it's a plea for the "beautiful future" not to be cruel. A melancholic-enough sentiment in many contexts, but when you take into account the fact that this song was written in the Soviet Union...
 
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