'Oumuamua: Interstellar Object: Rendezvous With Rama?

henry

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to say theres nothing near would require a useful comparison from within another part of the, or a, galaxy
 

INT21

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If the nearest three are around 4.3 light years away, the other 497 are logically going to be even further away.
 

INT21

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Interesting how the stars in that chart are all clustered in little groups, the members of which are less than one light year apart.
A third the distence we are from our nearest neighbors. And they are all in the same group.
 

henry

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isnt that a binary star system

either way whats your point, there are a set of nearest stars as shown ...
 

INT21

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..either way whats your point, ..

No idea, Henry, There is probably one in there somewhere.

I can't be bothered with 'why' games tonight.

See you all later.

UNT21
 

henry

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maybe that new yorker interviewee / scientific american piece author is a bit off his game, comes across as a bit all over the place in the middle of the interview ... or the journo was painting him that way maybe
 

markrkingston1

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maybe that new yorker interviewee / scientific american piece author is a bit off his game, comes across as a bit all over the place in the middle of the interview ... or the journo was painting him that way maybe
It seems to me that scientific articles/interviews in non-scientific publications always end up somewhat confused. All other things being equal, I'd tend to blame the journo/editing first.
 
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EnolaGaia

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There's an ongoing campaign of data analysis and theorizing about what 'Oumuamua may be. The current focus seems to be on whether or not it was an extrasolar comet.
‘Oumuamua, Our First Interstellar Visitor, May Have Been a Comet After All

New research flags jets of water vapor—rather than alien technology—as the source of the mysterious object’s anomalous motions

The mysteries surrounding ‘Oumuamua, our solar system’s first known interstellar visitor, are many: How did it get here, and from where? What gave rise to its extremely elongated (circa 250 meters long), potentially cigar-like shape, which so starkly distinguishes it from any natural object ever seen orbiting the sun? And most of all, what caused it to “hit the gas” after it swooped by our star, accelerating away like a passenger-filled car that accidentally entered a bad neighborhood?

The most obvious explanation for ‘Oumuamua’s properties and behavior—particularly its anomalous acceleration—is that it is a comet from another star system, albeit a decidedly weird one. In this scenario, ‘Oumuamua would have been ejected from its home system by a gravitational interaction with a large planet, perhaps gaining its shape from the associated wrenching forces and subsequent eons of exposure to cosmic radiation. Its speedy departure from our inner solar system, then, would be due to its briefly spouting plumes of gas from its icy, light-warmed surface after its close passage by our sun. This is the explanation preferred by European Space Agency scientist Marco Micheli, University of Hawaii astronomer Karen Meech and their colleagues, who first reported ‘Oumuamua’s anomalous acceleration. ...

FULL STORY: https://www.scientificamerican.com/...llar-visitor-may-have-been-a-comet-after-all/
 

EnolaGaia

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This newly published article:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-019-0816-x.epdf

... pushes back on the Loeb & Bialy suggestion that 'Oumuamua could have been an artificial space probe by reviewing the ways the available data is consistent with a natural object. Here's the abstract:
The natural history of ‘Oumuamua
The ‘Oumuamua ISSI Team*

The discovery of the first interstellar object passing through the Solar System, 1I/2017 U1 (‘Oumuamua), provoked intense and
continuing interest from the scientific community and the general public. The faintness of ‘Oumuamua, together with the lim-
ited time window within which observations were possible, constrained the information available on its dynamics and physical
state. Here we review our knowledge and find that in all cases, the observations are consistent with a purely natural origin for
‘Oumuamua. We discuss how the observed characteristics of ‘Oumuamua are explained by our extensive knowledge of natural
minor bodies in our Solar System and our current knowledge of the evolution of planetary systems. We highlight several areas
requiring further investigation.
Edit to Add:

See also: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190701144539.htm
 
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Schrodinger's Zebra

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This newly published article:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-019-0816-x.epdf

... pushes back on the Loeb & Bialy suggestion that 'Oumuamua could have been an artificial space probe by reviewing the ways the available data is consistent with a natural object. Here's the abstract:


Edit to Add:

See also: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190701144539.htm

Despite the research, I have to admit that I like to think there's still a chance that 'Oumuamua is artificial.

And we haven't yet seen anything like 'Oumuamua in our solar system. This thing is weird and admittedly hard to explain, but that doesn't exclude other natural phenomena that could explain it.
But whatever it turns out to be, it's still interesting. :)
 
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