Past (Prehistoric; Ancient; Historical) Medical Knowledge & Techniques

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
47,569
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Honey is bee sick, isn't it? I watched a program the other day which said it is the stuff they eat and regurgitate, to make honey. I love honey.
Yeah, I like eating sick too.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
27,774
Location
Out of Bounds
Honey is bee sick, isn't it? I watched a program the other day which said it is the stuff they eat and regurgitate, to make honey. I love honey.
Yes. I used to irritate my ex-wife by asking her to bring me or pass me the 'bee puke'.
 

IbisNibs

Exotic animal, sort of . . .
Joined
Oct 30, 2016
Messages
2,596
Location
Outside my comfort zone.
Was that because you called it bee puke, or because you asked her to get it for you instead of getting it yourself? :p
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
27,774
Location
Out of Bounds
Was that because you called it bee puke, or because you asked her to get it for you instead of getting it yourself? :p
She didn't mind bringing or passing it; she only rolled her eyes when I referred to it as bee puke.
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
38,621
Location
HM The Tower of London
The correct way to ask a wife to pass the honey is to do a waggle dance on the kitchen table incorporating a base 6 mathematical system to indicate the sun position relative to the jar using just your arse.
Presenting the arse would certainly a be thoughtful gesture.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
27,774
Location
Out of Bounds
This pushes the horizon for substantial medical intervention a lot farther back into the past ...

Recent discoveries at a megalithic site in Spain strongly indicate deliberate surgery was performed between 5,000 and 6,000 years ago. Furthermore, the evidence suggests the surgery was survived and led to healing before the patient's eventual death.
Gruesome Skull Discovery Contains The Earliest Evidence of Ear Surgery

An ancient skull uncovered at a 6,000-year-old megalithic monument in Spain still holds signs of what would have been a brutal ear surgery.

Archaeologists suspect the patient probably had a double-sided acute middle ear infection, which can cause earaches and fevers.

Without treatment, fluid can gather behind the eardrum, possibly causing a visible lump in the skull, hearing loss, or even life-threatening inflammation of the brain's outer membrane.

While now a common procedure, prior to the mid-19th century ear surgery was performed only in desperate attempts to save lives. Though some interpretations of ancient writings hint at surgical interventions as far back as the first century CE, solid evidence is hard to come by.

This gruesome skull discovery suggests similar procedures could have even been carried out thousands of years earlier. ...

However it happened, the surgery appears to have worked. The bones near both her ears show signs of deterioration, confirming an infection at some point, but they also show no signs of infection at the time of death. In fact, there was clear bone regeneration and remodeling, which is a common part of the healing process. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/earliest-evidence-of-ear-surgery-dates-back-more-than-5-000-years
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
27,774
Location
Out of Bounds
Here are the bibliographic details and abstract from the published research report. The full report is accessible at the link below.


Díaz-Navarro, S., Tejedor-Rodríguez, C., Arcusa-Magallón, H. et al.
The first otologic surgery in a skull from El Pendón site (Reinoso, Northern Spain)
Sci Rep 12, 2537 (2022).
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-06223-6

Abstract
Archaeological research in the Dolmen of El Pendón (Reinoso, Burgos, Spain) has brought to light the complex biography of a megalithic monument used throughout the 4th millennium cal. BC. The ossuary of this burial holds the bones of nearly a hundred individuals who suffered from diverse pathologies and injuries. This study presents the discovery of a skull with two bilateral perforations on both mastoid bones. These evidences point to a mastoidectomy, a surgical procedure possibly performed to relieve the pain this prehistoric individual may have suffered as a result of otitis media and mastoiditis. The hypothesis of surgical intervention is also supported by the presence of cut marks at the anterior edge of the trepanation made in the left ear. Furthermore, the results of this paper demonstrate the survival of the individual to both interventions. Given the chronology of this dolmen, this find would be the earliest surgical ear intervention in the history of mankind.

SOURCE / FULL REPORT: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-06223-6
 
Top