Penile Ossification (Fossilized Phallus; Calcified Cock; Petrified Pecker)

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
12,136
Likes
13,484
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
#1
Yes, it's a real "thing", but it's vanishingly rare ...

Doctors Take Hip X-Ray, Discover Patient's Penis Is Literally Turning to Bone

The human body is marvellously complicated, so it's no wonder that sometimes things can go spectacularly wrong - and we only find out by accident.

That's what happened to a 63-year-old man who went to a New York emergency department for left knee pain after falling on his behind, and ended up with an alarming and rare diagnosis - penile ossification.

The doctors found the shockingly rare case when they took an X-ray of the man's pelvis to check for signs of bone fracture due to his fall. Instead, they spotted a bone-like calcification in a truly unexpected place.

Calcium salts had built up in his soft tissue and hardened into "an extensive plaque" along his entire penile shaft ...

Aside from some pain, the patient presented with no other symptoms of this condition such as discharge or swelling. Penile ossification can cause reduced flexibility and can eventually lead to erectile dysfunction ...

But before the doctors could perform any further examinations, including possibly determining the cause, the man decided to leave, ignoring the medical advice he'd received. ...

"The treatment of penile ossification depends on the extent of corporal ossification and the symptoms of the patient," Georges El Hasbani from American University of Beirut and colleagues explain in their case report.

"Those with a bothersome acute pain or chronic mild pain may be managed with oral analgesics, topical agents, intralesional injections, mechanical stretching or vacuum devices, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Severe cases of chronic pain or erectile dysfunction are usually managed surgically. "

Penile ossification is actually more commonly seen in ageing dogs, but dogs already have a bone in their penis. In fact, most mammal species do.

This has led some scientists to speculate whether it might occur in humans due to an evolutionary throwback, but the condition has more recently been accepted it as a quirk in our bodies' fibrous connective tissues.

"The human body is able to form bone tissue or cartilage in places affected by pathological conditions when connective tissue is present," medical researchers explained in a literature review.

"Bone tissue is known to originate even in places having nothing in common with the skeleton, including the mammary gland, salivary gland and the testes."

This latest of rare cases was documented in Urology Case Reports.
SOURCE: https://www.sciencealert.com/a-man-...n-and-discovered-his-penis-is-turning-to-bone
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
12,136
Likes
13,484
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
#2
Here's some background info on the condition, from the NIH archives ...
Penile ossification: A traumatic event or evolutionary throwback? Case report and review of the literature

Pathologic calcification or ossification refers to the process by which calcium salts build up in soft tissue, causing it to harden and form extraskeletal bone. This may result from a malignant infiltrative process, hypercalcemia secondary to a paraneoplastic syndrome, end stage renal disease, calcium-phosphate abnormalities caused by hyperparathyroidism or other metabolic derangements, or from a local metaplastic process resulting from repeated trauma or a chronic inflammatory state.

Ossification occurring in the human penis is exceedingly rare, with fewer than 40 cases reported. Another related condition, “congenital human os penis,” is also extremely rare, with only 1 reported case in a 5-year-old boy. Ossification of the penis is most commonly due to Peyronie’s disease, a chronic inflammation of tunica albuginea that leads to penile fibrosis. The hardened plaque reduces flexibility and leads to a penile bend or curvature during erection. Less common etiologies of penile ossification have been reported, including local trauma to the penis, chronic hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease, chronic inflammatory states as in syphilis and gonorrhea, and with general metabolic disorders such as gout and diabetes. ...

The earliest case of penile ossification in the literature was reported by McClellan in 1827, who described a case of ossification along the full length of penis. In 1899 Chetwood reported a second case of ossification of corpora cavernosa in a postmortem specimen of a 55-year-old diabetic man. In 1933, Vermooten described a 19-year-old male in whom a bony mass had developed in the glans penis. The patient also had a gunshot wound at that site 3 months previously. Presumably ossification had taken place in fibrosis resulting from this injury. A fourth case of penile ossification was reported by Eglitis in 1953. In this case, microscopic examination of sections taken from a grossly normal penis at autopsy identified bony plaques in the subcutaneous tissue, with no clues as to the etiology of this ossification. In 1962, Elliot and Fischerman reported a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a 5-cm bone in his corpus spongiosum which required surgical excision. The man was previously diagnosed with gout; however, the bone formation was thought to be unrelated. Subsequent to these rare cases of penile ossification reported in the early literature, other cases of localized penile ossification secondary to Peyronie’s disease have been reported.

As the condition is so rare, controversy remains as to the etiology of penile ossification. Some have pointed to a possible connection between human penile ossification and the normally occurring os penis in animals. ...
FULL ARTICLE: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650806/
 
Top