"Political Correctness Gone Mad"

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LaurenChurchill

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Not necessarily. I think of the 'points' bit as referring to sections of an argument or statement. The 'dot' or 'bullet' bit referring to how they are presented in text.
 

rjmrjmrjm

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Personally I don't think we should be talking about 'points' at all with the rate of violent knife crime increasing. ;)
 

TRUE_THOMAS

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Anome_ said:
Actually, I thought they changed it because it's more than just body language.
I can only repeat what the course leader said.

And it goes on..

My Dad's just got out of hospital. When he was in I noticed the Nurse's Station outside of his ward had Christmas decorations but his ward had none. I commented upon it to a Staff Nurse, asking if it was a health issue. He told me no, wards are not allowed to have decorations in case it offends non-Christian patients. Four in the ward. My Dad, who believes like me, one God, many paths; a Methodist next to him on the opposite side of the ward, a Roman Catholic and a priest. :?
 

TRUE_THOMAS

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LaurenChurchill said:
Yeah that'd be so as not to offend this little dude. :lol: [/url]
At under 5'2" I'm quite a little dude myself and it doesn't offend me. What I do get offended by is the PC term "Vertically Challenged". Excuse me but I don't consider myself challenged by anybody or anything. I'm a short man. I have no more of a problem with someone calling me ahort than I have with calling other people tall. I don't have a problem with my height. If the PC crowd have to find a label for me, I would suggest that's their problem. They should deal with that.
 

Stormkhan

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I've always thought - rightly or wrongly - that "political correctness" or extremism in the thought or language editing, was usually zealously "enforced" by those who do not apply.

Hypothetical Circumstance - An offical "body" issues the edict that one cannot use the word "blind"; they must be referred to as "visually challenged". Now, blind is pretty all encompassing and I'm sure that a blind person will not take exception to being called blind. But this (Hypothetical) situation requires that the official body takes offence on behalf of the (non-existant) person regardless of actual truth.

Thus a blind man might be told off for saying "I'm blind" by a group of sighted twats, in the excuse that other blind folk might not like to be reminded that they are blind.

This is, of course, a theory yet to be supported by firm evidence ...
 

GNC

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TRUE_THOMAS said:
LaurenChurchill said:
Yeah that'd be so as not to offend this little dude. :lol: [/url]
At under 5'2" I'm quite a little dude myself and it doesn't offend me. What I do get offended by is the PC term "Vertically Challenged". Excuse me but I don't consider myself challenged by anybody or anything. I'm a short man. I have no more of a problem with someone calling me ahort than I have with calling other people tall. I don't have a problem with my height. If the PC crowd have to find a label for me, I would suggest that's their problem. They should deal with that.
Has anyone really ever used the term "Vertically Challenged" in all seriousness? I thought it was a joke?
 

liveinabin

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Just thought it worth a mention that I have been doing a lot of teaching in a multi-faith school recently.

This school is about 50% non-Christian religions.

However Christmas was still talked about and Christmas cards were made.

All the Muslim and Hindu children I taught were all happy to tell me about what they had asked Father Christmas for.

However, the Christmas dinner was a Winter Feast!
 

James_H

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RE: 'Christmas banned in Oxford - renamed the 'festival of winter light'' (can't find article)

I saw a leaflet here in Oxford for the 'festival of winter light' which had the name 'Christmas' printed quite clearly on the cover. I think this is a case of right-wing tabloids gone mad ;)
 

Anome

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H_James said:
RE: 'Christmas banned in Oxford - renamed the 'festival of winter light'' (can't find article)

I saw a leaflet here in Oxford for the 'festival of winter light' which had the name 'Christmas' printed quite clearly on the cover. I think this is a case of right-wing tabloids gone mad ;)
But isn't that true of all PC scares?
 

James_H

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Cwell, quite. I think that PC does exist, but in a kid of misguided, ineffectual way, and nothing like the kind of blanket cultural fascism that some people see it as.
 

wembley8

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Stormkhan said:
who do not apply.

Hypothetical Circumstance - An offical "body" issues the edict that one cannot use the word "blind"; they must be referred to as "visually challenged".
The problem is that in a case like that they may simply be trying to be more accurate. There are more partially-sighted people than completely blind ones, who may or may not be legally blind.

Btw I think the term is "visually impaired."

Some individuals may not be offended by 'offensive' language, but the point is more about using language to change the way we think. I used to work in an office where the boss referred to all women as 'tarts'; none of them openly objected.
 

TRUE_THOMAS

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gncxx said:
TRUE_THOMAS said:
LaurenChurchill said:
Yeah that'd be so as not to offend this little dude. :lol: [/url]
At under 5'2" I'm quite a little dude myself and it doesn't offend me. What I do get offended by is the PC term "Vertically Challenged". Excuse me but I don't consider myself challenged by anybody or anything. I'm a short man. I have no more of a problem with someone calling me ahort than I have with calling other people tall. I don't have a problem with my height. If the PC crowd have to find a label for me, I would suggest that's their problem. They should deal with that.
Has anyone really ever used the term "Vertically Challenged" in all seriousness? I thought it was a joke?
Believe me, it's no joke. I have on more than one ocassion been referred to as "vertically challenged".
 

Ravenstone

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I don't like the term Christian Name. For one thing, an awful lot of first names aren't Christian, so asking someone called Kandie or Kylie what their Christian name is just sounds silly. So I like First Name.

I suppose that's me being PC in a way. Or a pedantic tight arse. Your choice ;)
 

Quake42

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My Dad's just got out of hospital. When he was in I noticed the Nurse's Station outside of his ward had Christmas decorations but his ward had none. I commented upon it to a Staff Nurse, asking if it was a health issue. He told me no, wards are not allowed to have decorations in case it offends non-Christian patients. Four in the ward. My Dad, who believes like me, one God, many paths; a Methodist next to him on the opposite side of the ward, a Roman Catholic and a priest.
I'm afraid I don't I buy this one. A close friend was recently diagnosed with cancer and I've been visiting him in a well-known NHS hospital throughout December. The front of the building and foyer are full of Christmas decorations and the wards actually have a competition as to which one has the best decorations.

My suspicion would be that the staff in the hospital couldn't be bothered to decorate the ward and when challenged fell back on the old "PC gone mad" excuse...
 

wembley8

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escargot1 said:
That's because challenging the boss for calling you a tart gets you the sack.
No, it was just the culture at the time. People tend to be very accepting of the status quo, which is why it needs to be challenged some times. The defence "oh, but we've always used that word and nobody has complained before" should not be accepted. But people will always say it's PC gone mad if it goes against the status quo.
 

escargot

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I started work as a teenager 35 years ago and even back then women would object if they were addressed disrespectfully at work. Of course you'd then be called a 'feminist' (gasp!) and asked if you'd burned your bra, to which the answer was 'Shall we just get on with the job now?'

Perhaps it's just that I was a dragon then, as I am now. :lol:
 

Ravenstone

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Quake42 said:
My suspicion would be that the staff in the hospital couldn't be bothered to decorate the ward and when challenged fell back on the old "PC gone mad" excuse...
My suspicion is that it's to help prevent cross infection and (Saints preserve us) MRSA contamination. Mind you, my Dad was once put in a side ward to be barrier nursed - everyone who entered the room had to wear gowns and masks. Dunno quite what difference that made considering it was carpeted, flock wallpaper and fabric curtains. That, and both Mom and Dad watched the previous occupant being removed in the body bag, and Dad was wheeled in not ten minutes later. The nurses were not impressed when Mom complained, but still - we didn't know what the person had died from. The creepy thing was the bed was still a bit warm..... :?
 

rynner2

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Politically correct brigade demands one woman on each fire engine
Fire engines will have to have at least one firewoman on board in order to meet diversity guidelines, town hall leaders claim.

By Ben Leach
Last Updated: 2:26AM GMT 29 Dec 2008

The Local Government Association (LGA) has said that at at least 15 per cent of those in operational roles should be female.

That means they will fill one of the five or six places for crew on each engine.

The LGA said an increased number of firewomen is necessary "to meet the needs of local people".

But critics warned that political correctness was being put above the ability to save lives.

Susie Squire, of the Taxpayers' Alliance, said: "Introducing this sort of quota to the fire service is a big mistake.

"If ever there was a job that should be awarded on merit and physical fitness, it is that of a firefighter.

"This quota system will not only cost taxpayers money by introducing additional and unnecessary administration, but could risk the safety of all of us in the long run."

At present fewer than one in ten firefighters are female.

In future local councillors who are appointed to serve on the fire authorities will be asked to sign up to the "diversity charter".

One of the pledges they are expected to make is to "work to achieve recruitment targets of at least 15 per cent for women in operational roles".

Anthony Duggan, head of fire services at the LGA, said: "The fire service needs to be representative of the area it serves.

"It is important that the fire service attracts more women and ethnic minorities so that it can work more effectively in partnership with local authorities and other organisations to meet the needs of local people."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstop ... ngine.html
 

Ravenstone

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Just out of interest, are there any figures for how many female firefighters there are? I mean, have any been turned down for jobs? In short, would anyone ever be able to achieve a 15% figure?

And even if they did, why 'just' 15%? Surely if someone has been interviewed for a position, and feels that the sole reason they were rejected was on the basis of their gender, they have the same legal recourse as anyone else?
 

Stormkhan

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It's a thought - just a thought - that perhaps women don't aspire or work towards being a fireman, seeing as it is usually regarded as a male (dead butch) occupation.
Women are just as capable as men at being fire officers (in my opinion) but the service isn't promoted as being open to women ... and this is right from nursery school, as far as I am aware. If a little girl toddler wants to slap on a Fireman Sam helmet and run around putting out fires then while the playgroup leader wouldn't discourage her, they would find it very odd.

By tradition, working in the fire service is a male preserve. I wouldn't be surprised if women officers weren't the butt of ribaldry and outright abuse. It isn't right and should be discouraged but I don't have much hope if "officialdom" demands a percentage of females at each station without changing the perception of the public, promoting it as a worthwhile career (for a woman) and changing attitudes.
 

Xanatico

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Meet the needs of the local people? I would have thought their need was to have any fires put out.

Here in Sweden there was also recently some firechief announcing that the requirements for being a firefighter would be lowered, in order to get more women in. :?
 

Ravenstone

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I agree with Stormkhan. Do women want to be firefighters? Now those that do should be allowed to be firefighters, but honestly - only if they're suitable. I don't care whether my firefighter is male, female, or pre/post op TS, so long as I'm rescued and my fire put out. If I burn to death in the blaze because they lowered their standards to allow anyone in, then I shan't be too happy.
 

ted_bloody_maul

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Ravenstone said:
That, and both Mom and Dad watched the previous occupant being removed in the body bag, and Dad was wheeled in not ten minutes later. The nurses were not impressed when Mom complained, but still - we didn't know what the person had died from. The creepy thing was the bed was still a bit warm..... :?
Look on the bright side in that case - the guy couldn't have lain dead too long.
 
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Stormkhan said:
I've always thought - rightly or wrongly - that "political correctness" or extremism in the thought or language editing, was usually zealously "enforced" by those who do not apply.

Hypothetical Circumstance - An offical "body" issues the edict that one cannot use the word "blind"; they must be referred to as "visually challenged". Now, blind is pretty all encompassing and I'm sure that a blind person will not take exception to being called blind. But this (Hypothetical) situation requires that the official body takes offence on behalf of the (non-existant) person regardless of actual truth.

Thus a blind man might be told off for saying "I'm blind" by a group of sighted twats, in the excuse that other blind folk might not like to be reminded that they are blind.

This is, of course, a theory yet to be supported by firm evidence ...
Nope, this situation definitely exists. A lot of deaf people really hate the term "hearing impaired", and would rarely call themselves that. They just prefer "deaf".
 

Quake42

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Fire engines will have to have at least one firewoman on board in order to meet diversity guidelines, town hall leaders claim.

The Local Government Association (LGA) has said that at at least 15 per cent of those in operational roles should be female.

That means they will fill one of the five or six places for crew on each engine.
It doesn't, though, does it? A 15% target does not mean that there will be one woman on each fire engine. Some crews might have several women, others might have none. More bad journalism from the Mail.

I'm opposed to quotas in principle, but I would also say that, given that over half the population is female, a quota of 15% women in the fire service seems conservative if anything.

I don't buy this "women don't want to be firefighters" argument either. The same thing has been said about virtually every male-dominated trade or profession, only for the doubters to melt away when women show that, in fact, they would like to be doctors, lawyers or police officers.
 
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