Rabies

rynner2

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#1
Northern Va. Man First Reported U.S. Human Death from Raccoon Rabies
Atlanta (AP) - Scientists have documented the first human death in the United States from raccoon rabies. And the victim is from northern Virginia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today that a 25-year-old office worker died in March from rabies. The man, who was not identified, was hospitalized in mid-February with flu-like symptoms. He died after 14 days in the hospital.

Genetic analysis of tissue samples by the CDC (website/news) determined the man had gotten rabies from a raccoon.

Doctors could not figure out how or when the man became infected, despite extensive interviews with relatives, friends and co-workers.

The Virginia case is the only death reported so far in 2003.

Virginia's last fatal rabies case was in December 1998, when a prisoner died at the Nottoway Correctional Center in Burkeville.
 

MrRING

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#2
Rabies Victim Survives Without Vaccine

1st Unvaccinated Rabies Survivor Goes Home

WAUWATOSA, Wis. - A teenager who became the first person known to survive rabies without a vaccination went home Saturday after nearly 11 weeks in the hospital, officials said. Jeanna Giese, 15, was infected when a bat bit her at church in September but she did not immediately seek treatment. She began showing symptoms of rabies in mid-October.

"My biggest goal when this started, when I walked through those doors downstairs, was to someday take my daughter through those doors back out, and today that gets to happen," Giese's father, John Giese, said Saturday before the family left the hospital. A team of physicians at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin gambled on an experimental treatment and induced a coma as part of efforts to stave off the usually fatal infection.

Only five people besides Giese are known to have survived the rabies virus after the onset of symptoms. But unlike Giese, they had either been vaccinated or had received a series of rabies vaccine shots before showing symptoms. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (news - web sites) has said it is re-evaluating its approach to human rabies because of the results.

In recent weeks, Giese has worked to regain her weight, strength and coordination, although she will need physical and occupational therapy. One of Giese's doctors, Rodney Willoughby, said the girl's treatment must be duplicated in another person before it can be credited as a rabies treatment.

"I don't recommend you do stuff before you try them on animals but in this case we didn't have time," he said. "This was stitched together in four hours, discussed in an hour. It just turned out we were very lucky. Jeanna was very lucky."
Source

[Emp edit: Fixing BBcode to stop link from brekaing the board.]
 

Stormkhan

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#3
According to this report, rabies has a higher mortality rate than ebola! While the chances of 'natural' survival were slim, I didn't think it was 99.9% fatal!
However, this wasn't untreated rabies - they were treating her but with a different method to vaccination, i.e. induced coma.
Anyhow, I thought vaccination was a preventative, not a cure. And what made the doctors, or her family, willing to take the risk of 'new treatment' if the chances of non-vaccinated survival were that slim?
One of Giese's doctors, Rodney Willoughby, said the girl's treatment must be duplicated in another person before it can be credited as a rabies treatment.
So ... anyone who wants to risk death on an uncertainty, one step forward!
 

Cult_of_Mana

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#4
They probably didn't have any choice, Stormkhan.

The vaccines have to be administered immediately following a bite from an infected animal. When the girl arrived at the hospital they must have realised that she'd been infected weeks ago and decided upon this experimental treatment.
 

lopaka

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#5
Re: This is SO nasty...

lopaka said:
Rabies-infected organs kill 3 patients

Thursday, July 1, 2004 Posted: 7:22 PM EDT (2322 GMT)

ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) -- Rabies spread by organs taken from an infected donor has killed three transplant recipients, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

"This has never happened before," said Dr. Mitch Cohen, an infectious disease expert at the CDC, in a conference call with reporters.

A fourth recipient died during the actual transplant operation, before there was time to develop the disease, officials said.

Rabies was also determined to be responsible for the death of the organ donor.

The unprecedented case began nearly two months ago, shortly after an Arkansas man suffered a brain hemorrhage and died at Christus Saint Michael Healthcare Center in Texarkana, Texas.

The man's lungs, kidneys and liver were transplanted May 4.

The impact of the virus began to emerge within weeks.

The liver recipient died June 7; one kidney recipient died June 8 and the other kidney recipient died June 21. The patient who died was undergoing lung transplant surgery.



http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/07/01/rabies.organ.transplant/index.html
And it's happened again less than a year later.

Transplants spread rabies
Three people received tainted organs from same infected woman

18. Februar 2005 F.A.Z. Weekly. Three people contracted rabies after receiving organs from a woman who was infected with the illness, officials confirmed on Thursday.

The three patients in Hanover, Marburg and Hannoversch-Münden are in critical condition, according to the German Organ Transplantation Foundation. The foundation in Neu-Isenburg near Frankfurt announced the suspected rabies cases on Wednesday, and subsequent tests confirmed the suspicion a day later.

The 26-year-old woman who donated the organs had not shown any symptoms when she died of heart failure in December after consuming cocaine and ecstasy. Doctors said she probably caught the virus during a trip to India in October.

”There is no more doubt about the diagnosis,” said Herbert Schmitz, director of the Virology Department at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg.

Donors are not tested for the fatal disease because there is not enough time between the point that an organ is removed and transplanted.
”There's never been anything like this in Germany before,” said Günter Kirste, head of the donor foundation. ”But we are aware of a similar case in the United States from last summer.”

Three other patients who received transplants from the same woman were not showing signs of the disease. Doctors said one patient in Heidelberg who received a liver and two people in Mainz who received corneas were in stable condition.

Doctors said there was little hope for a woman in Hanover who received a lung transplant and a man in Hannoversch-Münden near Kassel who received a kidney transplant. A man in Marburg who received a pancreas and kidney is also in critical condition. Many of the people who have come in contact with these three patients have been given the rabies vaccine as a precaution.

The 26-year-old donor had her organs removed at the university hospital in Mainz. Thirty hospital employees who came in contact with the woman have received immunizations against the disease, said Dr. Manfred Thelen, medical director at the hospital. He said there was little risk the virus would spread.

He also said doctors could not reject every donor who had traveled to high risk areas or used illegal drugs. ”As scary as this case is - many more patients die because there are no organs available,” Thelen said.
Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system in such animals as dogs and bats. In humans, symptoms include fever, spasms of the throat muscles and extreme salivation. Once symptoms develop, death usually follows.

Rabies has been almost entirely eliminated in Germany, but around two cases appear each year, according to the Nocht institute. ”All were brought in from other countries,” Gerd-Dieter Burchard told the dpa news agency. ”Before traveling to [tropical] areas, people should talk to their doctors.” An estimated 30,000 to 50,000 people die of rabies in India each year.


© F.A.Z. Electronic Media GmbH 2001 - 2005
SOURCE
 
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#6
A Russian doctor has lost his job after telling a girl bitten by a stray dog to go to church rather than receive a rabies vaccine, the Interfax news agency reported Wednesday.

The hospital, based in the city of Dalnegorsk in Russia’s Far East, had ran out of the life-saving medicine, Interfax reported.

Instead, the doctor told the child’s parents to “go to church and light a candle to pray that the dog was healthy."

"We have conducted a thorough check-up to ensure that rabies vaccines are available in every institution in the region,” said Pavel Serebryakov, vice governor for the Primorye region.

“The failure which occurred in Dalnegorsk hospital defies explanation,” he said.

The child was able to receive the vaccination, Serebryakov confirmed.

https://themoscowtimes.com/news/russian-doctor-fired-for-advising-church-over-rabies-vaccine-55696
 

EnolaGaia

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#7
This story is a reminder that rabies is still a lethal threat ...
Doctors Thought a Woman Was Having a Panic Attack. She Actually Had Rabies.
When a Virginia woman went to the emergency room with shortness of breath, anxiety, sleeping troubles and difficulty swallowing water, doctors thought she was having a panic attack. But her symptoms were actually due to something much rarer: she had a rabies infection — one that would prove fatal — which she contracted from a dog bite while on a yoga retreat in India, according to a new report.

The case marks only the ninth time in the past decade that a person has died from rabies in the U.S. from an infection acquired abroad, according to the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The tragic case highlights the need for travelers to be aware of the risks of rabies when visiting certain countries and to receive "preexposure" rabies vaccines before travel when recommended, the report said. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/64425-rabies-yoga-retreat-india.html
 
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#8
Never know when a rabid bat will appear and bite you.

An 86-year-old man is being treated for rabies after being bitten by a bat wedged between the back of his iPad and its case.

Roy Syvertson, from New Hampshire in the US, told WMUR-TV that he had been using the tablet for about an hour before the creature popped its head out and nipped him.

https://news.sky.com/story/man-trea...srtp-cIHo0IhP8uH0X3c6MOs1yai4tOVXQB_5kc6SltsM
 

EnolaGaia

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#9
Here's some historical background on the disease ...

The earliest record of canine rabies appears in Mesopotamian cuneiform law tablets from about 2000 BC. The codex set a heavy fine for any dog owner who allowed a dog with symptoms of the disease to bite another person. The disease’s zoonotic ability to jump from animals to humans is thought to have originated in Mesopotamia, reaching China in the sixth century BC. Rabies was known in ancient Anatolia by the fifth century BC, mentioned by Xenophon and Aristotle. As rabies spread to Italy and Europe, many Byzantine doctors and medieval medical writers described the symptoms and course of the dread disease (animal symptoms include snapping and biting, excessive drooling, hydrophobia).

Rabies arrived in Greece in the fifth century BC. The ancient temple of Athena at Rhocca (Crete) was notorious for rabid dogs. Athena of Rhocca was invoked to cure human victims of rabies. In about AD 200, the natural historian Aelian described an experiment to cure some young boys who had been bitten by rabid dogs near Rhocca, whose ruins are found south of Methymna, Crete. A doctor administered the toxic stomach acid of seahorses to his patients in an attempt to counteract the mad dog “venom.” This early attempt to fight poison/venom with another poison/venom (anticipating the principles of vaccines, chemotherapy, and venomics) failed and the stricken boys died.
SOURCE: https://io9.gizmodo.com/was-rabies-used-an-ancient-biological-weapon-827788021
 

EnolaGaia

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#10
This Live Science article considers the notion of rabies as one factor or source of tropes that contributed to legends of vampires and / or werewolves. Here's the article's introductory section. Go to the link (below) to read more about the possible connections with werewolf / vampire legends.

How Rabies Inspired Folktales of Werewolves and Vampires

By Jessica Wang - Associate Professor of U.S. History, University of British Columbia

In 1855, a story about the gruesome murder of a bride by her new husband started it all.

In 1855, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported on the gruesome murder of a bride by her new husband. The story came from the French countryside, where the woman's parents had initially prevented the couple's engagement "on account of the strangeness of conduct sometimes observed in the young man," although he "otherwise was a most eli[g]ible match."

The parents eventually consented, and the marriage took place. Shortly after the newlyweds withdrew to consummate their bond, "fearful shrieks" came from their quarters. People quickly arrived to find "the poor girl… in the agonies of death — her bosom torn open and lacerated in a most horrible manner, and the wretched husband in a fit of raving madness and covered with blood, having actually devoured a portion of the unfortunate girl's breast."

The bride died a short time later. Her husband, after "a most violent resistance," also expired.

What could have caused this horrifying incident? "It was then recollected, in answer to searching questions by a physician," that the groom had previously "been bitten by a strange dog." The passage of madness from dog to human seemed like the only possible reason for the grisly turn of events. ...

The Eagle described the episode matter-of-factly as "a sad and distressing case of hydrophobia," or, in today's parlance, rabies.

But the account read like a Gothic horror story. It was essentially a werewolf narrative: The mad dog's bite caused a hideous metamorphosis, which transformed its human victim into a nefarious monster whose vicious sexual impulses led to obscene and loathsome violence.

My new book, "Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers: Rabies, Medicine, and Society in an American Metropolis, 1840-1920," explores the hidden meanings behind the ways people talked about rabies. Variants of the rabid groom story had been told and retold in English language newspapers in North America since at least the beginning of the 18th century, and they continued to appear as late as the 1890s. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/rabies-inspired-werewolf-vampire-folktales.html
 

brownmane

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#11
I just listened to this podcast yesterday. "Act 1" is a true story of a woman who was attacked by a rabid raçcoon. The description of what rabies does is, to me, fairly gruesome.

And I will warn that the story may bother some who are sensitive to cruelty towards animals as the raccoon is dispatched in a very nasty manner.

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/319/and-the-call-was-coming-from-the-basement
 
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