Racing Cows

IbisNibs

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#91
Hadyn was a toddler on the neighbouring farm who'd follow his father into the milking shed and when I'd visited (they sold ice cream) he'd fallen over backwards in the yard. He was covered in shit from the top of his head to the back of his heels and it had hardened - a three foot tall Excremental shambling like a zombie as he couldn't drop his arms. So sweet.
:rollingw:
 

Sollywos

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#93
Aw bless - admittedly that tongue is unbelievably long. My little sister was in a pushchair with the hood down (drizzle) as Mum and me waited for a herd to pass, cows are curious (not just odd but inquisitive) and one trotted over to take a look under the hood. Sister and cow face were a millimetre apart, I don't remember if there was a snort or a lick or a moo but I do remember the look on Sis's face afterwards - 'oh FFS now what ?!' Hadyn was a toddler on the neighbouring farm who'd follow his father into the milking shed and when I'd visited (they sold ice cream) he'd fallen over backwards in the yard. He was covered in shit from the top of his head to the back of his heels and it had hardened - a three foot tall Excremental shambling like a zombie as he couldn't drop his arms. So sweet.
I can smell it from here :dpoo:

Yes it does get a crust on quick doesn't it! Oh dear and your poor sis I can picture that look love her. :)

Sollywos x
 

damando5

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#94
When I was a kid one of my neighbors had a bull in its fenced in yard all by itself. I recon it had at least 30 acres. If you were to walk by the fence and he was on the other side of his pasture he was sure to run at full speed to check out who was near his property. I saw [after the fact] by a few minutes that he was more than able to go through a barbed wire fence with a wooden one [two fence security] . I even saw a field hand try to coerce him back into his area with a wooden baseball bat [snapped in half over his head] it didn't faze him one bit. He was just the top bull of the time. There were other ones but not as ornery as he was.
 

Spudrick68

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#98
A mate of mine at school came from Irish stock. His uncle in Northern Ireland used to tell him, if you get charged by a bull punch it on the nose.
 

Sollywos

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A farmer told me that if ever his cows were bothering me I could hit them with my stick and they'd lose interest. There was a narrow path I walked along in between their field and the river and I wasn't entirely comfortable with them all rushing over to crowd round the fence and follow me. I was concerned that the fence would give way and I'd end up in the river. I had no intention of putting it to the test and just had to learn to trust the fence as it seemed preferable to provide a bit of entertainment for bored cows than be cruel to them. No way would I put the method to the test with bulls or sharks!

Sollywos x
 
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A farmer told me that if ever his cows were bothering me I could hit them with my stick and they'd lose interest. There was a narrow path I walked along in between their field and the river and I wasn't entirely comfortable with them all rushing over to crowd round the fence and follow me. I was concerned that the fence would give way and I'd end up in the river. I had no intention of putting it to the test and just had to learn to trust the fence as it seemed preferable to provide a bit of entertainment for bored cows than be cruel to them. No way would I put the method to the test with bulls or sharks!

Sollywos x
Use the stick to hit farmers that follow you instead.
 

catseye

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When I worked with cattle (dairy herd) I had a 'favourite cow'. She used to lick my hands and arms for the salt when I'd been working hard at the end of the day, and eat cow cubes off hand hand, like a horse.

I loved her. RIP my lovely Salad (yes, that was her name).
 

Krepostnoi

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There was a young Researcher (outstanding in his Field)
:clap:
At first I was confused by this list, but then remembered something that people not knowing bovines, probably didn't know. Interesting to me is that farmers "feed" their cattle magnets (one only). The magnet (at least the ones I played with as a kid) is about 3-4 inches long, smooth cylindrical. It is injected (not exactly sure if injected or inserted is the right word) through a tube that is inserted into the cow's mouth to its stomach. The magnet stays there to attract any wire that the cow may eat. It protects the cow from a punctured stomach that would happen if the wire remained free floating in it.

Cattle don't intentionally eat wire, but you never know what they might come across when grazing.
This reminds me of Papillon. Only, the convicts used to have to, erm, re-insert their cylindrical objects every day. How come the cows avoid this unsavoury requirement?
 

brownmane

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:clap:

This reminds me of Papillon. Only, the convicts used to have to, erm, re-insert their cylindrical objects every day. How come the cows avoid this unsavoury requirement?
Cows have four stomachs so it is placed in the first one . They also regurgitate their food and chew the cud to further break it down to then pass through the next stomach. I have never really investigated bovine digestive process, but this would be why, I'm almost sure, the magnet stays in the first stomach.
 

EnolaGaia

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Don't know why I didn't ask this before: is there ever so much metallic foreign matter stuck to the magnet in the first stomach that it becomes advisable to get it out?
Surgery is sometimes performed when accumulation of metal leads to hardware disease:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardware_disease

... but I can't find any mention of removing the magnet for maintenance / cleaning purposes short of the cow's exhibiting symptoms of illness or internal injury (which would require surgery).
 

Bad Bungle

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Hate to say it but I suspect the life-span of a Dairy cow doesn't warrant (economically) the surgical removal of a magnet.
 

EnolaGaia

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Hate to say it but I suspect the life-span of a Dairy cow doesn't warrant (economically) the surgical removal of a magnet.
Yep ... The Wikipedia article on hardware disease mentions slaughter as an option that is often the most economically justified choice.
 

IbisNibs

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That does seem likely. Poor cows! :(

From the article: "It [hardware disease] is very rarely reported in any other ruminants."
Does this indicate that deer are smarter than cows? Or just less complacent?

BTW, I once heard an interview with an ornithologist who complained that the birds he netted for banding were sometimes eaten by deer. Deer have their place, but they are certainly not Bambi!
 

Bad Bungle

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That does seem likely. Poor cows! :(

From the article: "It [hardware disease] is very rarely reported in any other ruminants."
Does this indicate that deer are smarter than cows? Or just less complacent?
Probably deer are more fussy eaters, although I'm not sure who would be reporting hardware disease in non-bovine ruminants and on what scale.
Incidentally, we kept some farm pigs in the 1960s and they would get 'slops' delivered, which was left-over food collected from the local Schools.
This practice stopped when it was decided that left-overs shouldn't enter the food chain ie what was fit for human consumption wasn't fit for animal consumption. Point was that in the bottom of the troughs after the pigs had finished were the odd knives and forks and an surprising amount of broken glass - none ingested and all carefully licked clean.
 

EnolaGaia

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... From the article: "It [hardware disease] is very rarely reported in any other ruminants."
Does this indicate that deer are smarter than cows? Or just less complacent? ...
Probably deer are more fussy eaters ...
According to the hardware disease article (cited above) the key fact is that cows are relatively sloppy and indisriminate eaters:

Cattle commonly swallow foreign objects, because they do not use their lips to discriminate between materials and they do not completely chew their feed before swallowing. ...
 

brownmane

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That does seem likely. Poor cows! :(

From the article: "It [hardware disease] is very rarely reported in any other ruminants."
Does this indicate that deer are smarter than cows? Or just less complacent?!
I don't know about domesticated deer (those raised by people), but I wonder if it (meaning metal objects such as pieces of fencing) is not something that wild deer are exposed to as often as domesticated cattle.
 
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