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Random Australia

Kingsize Wombat

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I vaguely remember this series

Way back when Doctor Who's TARDIS was only just taking off, an Australian TV series was exploring the science fiction genre.

The Stranger was Australia's first locally-produced science fiction television show and one of the first Australian series to be sold overseas. It was immediately popular after it first aired on the ABC on April 5, 1964, but has since faded into obscurity.

While Doctor Who developed a cult following over the following decades, The Stranger sat untouched in the ABC's film archives. But thanks to a team of dedicated film archivists, the series will have a new life after being remastered for ABC iview. The first episode was launched for streaming on Wednesday afternoon and can be streamed on ABC iview now.

RetroFocus co-founder Jon Steiner said bringing the show back to TV screens had been a dream of his and his team's for about two years. He and fellow RetroFocus co-founder Helen Meany thought it was an interesting show, and wanted to see if it would still resonate with modern viewers. They each used their own children as test audiences. Although the footage was grainy black and white, and the pace a little different than what they were used to, they gave the series an enthusiastic thumbs-up. ...

The series is about a mysterious man who is discovered unconscious on the steps of the Walsh family home one rainy night. This man, played by Ron Haddrick, says he cannot remember his name or how he came to be there, but is able to speak German and French. He gives himself the name Adam, is hired as a teacher at the school Mr Walsh is headmaster of and befriends the Walsh children Bernie and Jean and their schoolfriend Peter. The trio soon discovers Adam is an alien and intergalactic hijinks ensue. ...

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-02/abc-iview-to-stream-the-stranger-australian-dr-who/11870424
I watched that series one the ABC app. Geez Louise, it certainly wasn't a match for the old Dr Who!
 

Lord Lucan

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I was passing by the mysterious Lake George today, just north of Canberra, once again almost devoid of water. Rumoured home of Yowies, numerous spectres, UFO sightings and other mysterious phenomena.
Excuse the poor photo, taken from the car at 120 kmh.
20200627_151935_compress39.jpg
 

Tigerhawk

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I was passing by the mysterious Lake George today, just north of Canberra, once again almost devoid of water. Rumoured home of Yowies, numerous spectres, UFO sightings and other mysterious phenomena.
Excuse the poor photo, taken from the car at 120 kmh.
View attachment 27565
Desperate to get away from Canberra, were you?
 

Sid

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If I heard someone talking about 'salties', I think I'd probably interpret that as salty snacks.
Think I'd think of 'salties' as old sea-dogs (like pirates/men of the sea, and so-on)
 

hunck

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emus banned from pub in outback Australia town

Kevin and Carol, friendly emus who wander the town of Yaraka in Queensland, have been barred from the only pub after leaving droppings on the floor and stealing toast

Gerry Gimblett, who owns the Yaraka Hotel with her husband Chris, told Guardian Australia they were left with no other option after the birds’ recent “bad behaviour”.

“They’ve been stealing things from the guests, especially their food. They’d stick their heads in and pinch toast out of the toaster,” Gimblett explained.

“But the main reason we’ve banned them is their droppings. They’re enormous, very large and very smelly, and they created great stains,” she said.

Gimblett said the emus had become a tourist attraction after several eggs were hatched at the end of 2018, and while at one point there were nine emus in town, most had wandered away from town or been hit in accidents. Just two large emus remain, Kevin and Carol, who circle the area around the pub.

Leeanne Byrne, a Yaraka resident and frequent patron at the hotel, cared for the emus after they hatched.

“We love them as part of the Yaraka community, but they’re not welcome inside any more.”
Blacklisted: misbehaving emus.
 

ramonmercado

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Strewth! These are some flyers!

Australia’s biggest bats—known as flying foxes—are among the world’s most restless nomads, according to a new study.

Just how restless? The most peripatetic can journey up to 6000 kilometers per year, much farther than any land mammal and close to the distances covered by some whales and migrating birds.

This continent’s flying foxes can weigh up to 1 kilogram with meter-wide wing spans. But instead of hunting like other bats, they make nightly forays to flowers in search of nectar, pollen, and seeds. By day, they roost by the thousands in trees.

Researchers had thought these bats stayed local, loyal to a particular roost. But when they put satellite transmitters on 201 bats from three species in eastern Australia, they found they were mistaken: From months of tracking each bat, they calculated that the bats wandered anywhere from 1487 to 6073 kilometers per year, they report today in BMC Biology.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/202...ilometers-year-farther-wildebeest-and-caribou
 

Lord Lucan

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14 Foot, 349 KG Crocodile relocated from tourist area (he's a big one)...

bigcroc.jpg


Huge crocodile caught at Australian Outback tourist hotspot
A 14.5ft (4.4m) saltwater crocodile weighing 770lbs (349kg) has been trapped by wildlife rangers at an Australian tourist hotspot.

The croc is the biggest caught in the area in years, wildlife ranger John Burke claimed.

The huge male was caught in the Flora River at a remote nature park 75 miles southwest of the Outback town of Katherine in Australia's Northern Territory, which is popular with travellers.

Mr Burke said he did not know of a larger crocodile caught in the Flora River.
https://news.sky.com/story/huge-crocodile-caught-at-australian-outback-tourist-hotspot-12060342
 

Lord Lucan

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He must have been hungry...


Possum busts into Brisbane Bunnings in broad daylight to pick apart nursery plants
A brazen possum has been caught red-handed with enough greens to last a lifetime after busting into a Brisbane Bunnings nursery department in the middle of the day.

The common brushtail possum was filmed happily munching on a lettuce seedling by Yvonne McRostie, who shot the footage last month at the Carseldine store on Brisbane's north.

The video was posted on the ABC Brisbane Facebook page this morning where it has been viewed more than 70,000 times.

Ms McRostie said a staff member eventually came along and shooed the creature away.

"It looks like it was a regular occurrence there, it went into the wall of pots and went up there," Ms McRostie said.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09...ne-bunnings-to-eat-lettuce-in-nursery/8862858
 

Yithian

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skinny

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Faaarkn funny.

Strewth! These are some flyers!

Australia’s biggest bats—known as flying foxes—are among the world’s most restless nomads, according to a new study.

Just how restless? The most peripatetic can journey up to 6000 kilometers per year, much farther than any land mammal and close to the distances covered by some whales and migrating birds.

This continent’s flying foxes can weigh up to 1 kilogram with meter-wide wing spans. But instead of hunting like other bats, they make nightly forays to flowers in search of nectar, pollen, and seeds. By day, they roost by the thousands in trees.

Researchers had thought these bats stayed local, loyal to a particular roost. But when they put satellite transmitters on 201 bats from three species in eastern Australia, they found they were mistaken: From months of tracking each bat, they calculated that the bats wandered anywhere from 1487 to 6073 kilometers per year, they report today in BMC Biology.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/202...ilometers-year-farther-wildebeest-and-caribou
We have a few colonies around this fair city. They can be mesmerising to observe when they move in their hundreds across the night sky.

I was watching them circle about round midnight a few weeks ago on one of my furtive fire nights just back in The Hills there. I had sat my freshly poured pint of Guinness atop a fence post to settle while I had a wee. Heard a flutter, a clink and a splashy clunk. Turned to see a bloody great owl wheel about and fly up into the gumtree above me. The cheeky fucker had come in low out of the rising moon and kicked my pint off the post and into the dirt. I expect it had assumed the creamy head was a diminutive rodent. I cursed the bastard out while it sat and ranted back at me in its disappointment. Eventually we both chilled, I poured a new one and we put it behind us. Although we did do side eyes for quite a while... me n Arthur there.
 

skinny

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Australian regional towns and their industries are grinding to a halt. Unemployment is rising. Their society is changing. The writing is on the wall = NO FUTURE. It all boils over. This is the inside story of the event.

This is the poetic interpretation in rock - something of an anthem for my generation X.

I was 1km up the coast from where another of these riots kicked off in January 1984. Glenelg went mental for one long Saturday night. Our little sister was out roaming Jetty Road with her mates when it kicked off. We couldn't find her. Our parents were freaking out. They couldn't get the cops' help coz the entire metro force was engaged. We got her back, but that was a rotten night. I was shit scared for all of us out in pairs looking for her. Oz is relatively safe, but there's a wild streak that sits in there not too far below that rises quick, an overdeveloped sense of being put upon by authorities that can turn savage. Once it's out it runs its course and then settles, but you don't want to look into its face. It's pretty ugly.
 

Kondoru

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A Quokka is a kind of roo, yes?
 

skinny

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Quokka and Roos are both in the marsupial family. ...phylum? order?

I didn’t go to school.
 

ramonmercado

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Oz Scaredingoes.

Inflatable tube men—those wacky, wriggling figures that tower near car dealerships and mattress stores—are typically designed to grab attention.

But scientists in Australia have used them for the opposite purpose: to scare away unwanted onlookers. A new study suggests the unpredictable movements of these dancing eyesores could keep wild dingoes from killing livestock.

“It’s exciting … to see real [alternatives] to lethal management of dingoes,” says Colleen St. Clair, a conservation biologist of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, who was not involved in the study. The approach, she says, might not just save farm animals—but the dingoes themselves.

Dingoes have been a bane to Australian farmers for centuries. The medium-size canines often sneak into ranches, killing mostly sheep, but also some cattle and goats. Official reports, though inconsistent, suggest the wild canines kill thousands of farm animals and cause up to $60 million in damages every year. ...

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/10/wacky-tube-men-could-keep-dingoes-away-livestock-australia
 

Dinobot

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Broadcasting from the moon...
This Blue Tongue Lizard was found enjoying the shade at Chateaux Dinobot this morning. Haven't seen one for a while...
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Swifty

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Oz Scaredingoes.

Inflatable tube men—those wacky, wriggling figures that tower near car dealerships and mattress stores—are typically designed to grab attention.

But scientists in Australia have used them for the opposite purpose: to scare away unwanted onlookers. A new study suggests the unpredictable movements of these dancing eyesores could keep wild dingoes from killing livestock.

“It’s exciting … to see real [alternatives] to lethal management of dingoes,” says Colleen St. Clair, a conservation biologist of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, who was not involved in the study. The approach, she says, might not just save farm animals—but the dingoes themselves.

Dingoes have been a bane to Australian farmers for centuries. The medium-size canines often sneak into ranches, killing mostly sheep, but also some cattle and goats. Official reports, though inconsistent, suggest the wild canines kill thousands of farm animals and cause up to $60 million in damages every year. ...

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/10/wacky-tube-men-could-keep-dingoes-away-livestock-australia
A bit like the Japanese robot wolves used to scare off bears then ..

 

skinny

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How is it that a band of old blokes in their 60s can entice a crowd of about 5000 people out of their towns and cities and onto a giant sand dune 1000km from the nearest metropolis, a place with zero infrastructure in the middle of an ice cold winter to sing along to songs about human rights, land rights, social politics and our frail sense of nationhood? Just listen and learn. The Oils - voice of my generation.
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