Random/Peculiar Images

JamesWhitehead

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According to this site:

Site Description The distinctive horseshoe frontage of the Smithy, Machynlleth, was added to an older smithy in 1896 by the Marchioness of Londonderry for the visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales. The front is of purple engineering brick with end pilasters, cornice and stepped feature to centre. The horseshoe arch doorway has terracotta voussoirs, with regularly spaced 'nails'; the label has scrolled ends. :)
 

Peripart

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According to this site:

Site Description The distinctive horseshoe frontage of the Smithy, Machynlleth, was added to an older smithy in 1896 by the Marchioness of Londonderry for the visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales. The front is of purple engineering brick with end pilasters, cornice and stepped feature to centre. The horseshoe arch doorway has terracotta voussoirs, with regularly spaced 'nails'; the label has scrolled ends. :)
Ha! Well there you go. Thank you for Googling what I couldn't be arsed to look up!
 

Austin Popper

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On the subject of interesting building details, this place is in downtown Helena, Montana. I first encountered it while looking out the window of a hotel room across the street. Whoa! There was another interesting building near it, but I don't recall just what it was. I took some photos (with film as it was about '93) which I probably have in a shoe box somewhere around here. I'll have to see if I can find them. I went exploring for more over-the-top architecture, but just found normal stuff other than the two buildings I photographed. I'm surprised the other one is gone, but I may simply have overlooked it on Street View. That area has changed a lot since I was there.

https://flic.kr/p/rxt6N
https://flic.kr/p/rxt8L
 
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EnolaGaia

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On the subject of interesting building details, this place is in downtown Helena, Montana. I first encountered it while looking out the window of a hotel room across the street. ...
This is the Atlas Building ...

The Atlas Building is one of Helena’s most fanciful; on a cornice upheld by Atlas, a salamander and lizards do symbolic battle. An insurance company built the building (for $40,000) as an advertisement. The salamanders—mythical creatures like phoenixes that fire cannot destroy—cavort atop the building while stylized flames lick across the building’s top. Atlas bears the symbolic burden for the policy holders.
SOURCE: http://wherearethedixonstoday.blogspot.com/2012/08/buildings-of-helena-mt.html
 

skinny

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On the subject of interesting building details, this place is in downtown Helena, Montana. I first encountered it while looking out the window of a hotel room across the street. Whoa! There was another interesting building near it, but I don't recall just what it was. I took some photos (with film as it was about '93) which I probably have in a shoe box somewhere around here. I'll have to see if I can find them. I went exploring for more over-the-top architecture, but just found normal stuff other than the two buildings I photographed. I'm surprised the other one is gone, but I may simply have overlooked it on Street View. That area has changed a lot since I was there.

https://flic.kr/p/rxt6N
https://flic.kr/p/rxt8L
I'd grab a coffee and sit looking at that for 40 minutes.

A good building's like a good book. I like deco. We got a lot of deco in our town.
 

EnolaGaia

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...There was another interesting building near it, but I don't recall just what it was. ...
Austin: Check the link I posted above. It includes photos of other interesting buildings in downtown Helena. Perhaps the one you mentioned as being MIA is among them.
 

EnolaGaia

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Here's another historical building from Helena (Montana). It incorporates a quirky architectural design feature or motif I'd never seen before. Can you tell what it is?

IMG_61513.jpg

"The Power Block was built in 1889; note that on the corner, each of the five floors has windows grouped in corresponding numbers of panes."
http://wherearethedixonstoday.blogspot.com/2012/08/buildings-of-helena-mt.html
 

Austin Popper

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https://flic.kr/p/rxt8L
Austin: Check the link I posted above. It includes photos of other interesting buildings in downtown Helena. Perhaps the one you mentioned as being MIA is among them.
Thanks! There are far more interesting buildings there than I remember. As I recall, next to the Atlas there was another building from the same era, with some wild sculptured details of its own. I'm sure the street was still open to motor traffic, and I'm also sure the downtown was pretty drab and threadbare generally. I did not recognize the area when I found it with a search. I recalled the Atlas building, and was sure it was in Montana. Anyway, I think the modern building just to the right of the Atlas is the location of the other one. Surprising. It was impressive too.

I'll have to dig around in my old photos. I was in Helena just once, on a bus tour, so it was a quick overnight stay and on to some National Park or other. It was a great job and I saw many wonderful things, but often it was just too hectic to allow for much exploring. Did more of it than I had time for anyway, which caused me to be constantly behind on my lowest priority: company paperwork. (My bosses saw it differently) I love old buildings and took lots of photos. Never got around to albumizing them.
 

Austin Popper

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That looks like something from Fark, you know, here's a picture of a birthday cake to try your Photoshop skills on, but a very brief Google search convinced me it wasn't worth digging for. Yikes. Fark has some very talented people doing very funny things to otherwise innocuous images.
 

Ladyloafer

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That looks like something from Fark, you know, here's a picture of a birthday cake to try your Photoshop skills on, but a very brief Google search convinced me it wasn't worth digging for. Yikes. Fark has some very talented people doing very funny things to otherwise innocuous images.
Seems to be by an artist called julie verhoevan. I didn't know that when I posted it, it was just some rando shit from pinterest.

https://www.instagram.com/julieverhoeven/

Today's rando shit from pinterest - Sahara snow!

3e2feca5fda3576613e042f4243f43e1.jpg
 

Lord Lucan

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View attachment 19830

from "How to Shit in the Woods"

I'm sure some of this went on in the Devil's Garden! :sstorm:

from awfullibrarybooks.net
There are those amongst us today who almost need instructions on surviving basic daily life. Therefore it comes as no surprise to me, that there's a manual for shitting in the woods. Afterall where does one find a loo in the forest?
 

EnolaGaia

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There are those amongst us today who almost need instructions on surviving basic daily life. Therefore it comes as no surprise to me, that there's a manual for shitting in the woods. Afterall where does one find a loo in the forest?
Exactly ...

Back in my intensive hiking / backpacking days decades ago, I got a copy of How to Shit In the Woods as a sort of novelty item after multiple trail-mates admitted ignorance of toilet and sanitation praxis in the wild. It was a surprisingly informative little book, many fellow trekkers asked to borrow it, and everyone who read it said they'd learned something. It proved popular enough that I gave copies of it as gifts to trekker and traveler friends.
 
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