Random Stuff From Your Neck O' The Woods

gattino

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The Picton reading room, upstairs. I was interested to wander in as a Spanish guest researching something a few months back came home besotted with it, as she'd only ever seen rooms like that in Harry Potter.

"Come and take choice of all my library and so beguile thy sorrow" WS, Titus Andronicus.
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JamesWhitehead

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The Picton is wonderful. I knew it back in the eighties, when it was in a sorry state. I'm sure that many of the smaller rooms, now opened, were then locked away from public view. It was lovely to see the restored version on a visit a few years back. The Edwardians may have been surprised by the uplift of the lighting but the solid grandeur was always, potentially, a balloon for the grandest of flights! :angel:
 

gattino

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While I'm playing local tour guide , and with a faint fortean connection, here is an often unnoticed little item in Matthew Street, Liverpool where the Cavern club is situated and every other premises and sculpture is Beatles themed. It's a bust of Carl Jung, weirdly embedded in a little box shaped hole in the wall, the whole thing looks rather roughly installed, and its easy to walk past without noticing it.

The bust results from the quote beneath it "Liverpool Is The Pool Of Life". Jung's word are frequently cited in the local paper and in visitor guides etc, as it obviously sounds like a glowing assessment of the city and its identity by a great man. What gives the whole thing added oddness is that Jung never set foot in Liverpool and was passing no opinion on the place at all. The words appear in his analysis of one of his own dreams, set in the city. He interpreted it as a subconscious play on words...live/r/pool is the pool of life.

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EnolaGaia

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... It's a bust of Carl Jung, weirdly embedded in a little box shaped hole in the wall, the whole thing looks rather roughly installed, and its easy to walk past without noticing it. ...
The bust's seemingly weird placement probably relates to the fact it's not the original Jung sculpture installed at that location on Mathew Street.

a statue of Jung was erected in Mathew Street in 1987, but being made of plaster, was vandalised and replaced by a more durable version in 1993.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathew_Street

This is the original statue ...

CarlJungStatueLiverpool.jpg
This appears to be either a second version or a re-orientation of the original ...

The-Liverpool-School-of-Language-Music-Dream-and-Pun.jpg
And this is apparently the current version - the bust alone ...

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JamesWhitehead

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Gosh! The Armadillo Tea Rooms. That takes me back.

I have no memory of CGJ, alas. Maybe he was displaced when the windows of the Tea Rooms were extended to open onto the street for a more outdoor experience.

I can remember the confidence with which a friend prescribed Armadillo Tea-Room Earl Grey as the antidote to a very heavy night on the town. The violence of those bergamot vomits clicked in as soon as I was off the premises! I'm amazed I could ever face the stuff again.

My memories of Liverpool as it was are fading but Flanagan's Apple was elsewhere, I think, before the generic Irish Pub label was dreamed up.
 
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gattino

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The bust's seemingly weird placement probably relates to the fact it's not the original Jung sculpture installed at that location on Mathew Street.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathew_Street

This is the original statue ...

The multiple versions you show (the first one looks awful) and the dates confuse me as neither are mentioned nor line up with the details recorded in a 2011 article in the Liverpool Echo. On second reading however part of the contradiction may reflect that the bust itself is rather secondary...it appears the thing of significance is the smooth slab on which it sits and onto which Jungs words are inscribed. It worth citing as it has a definite magical element to it...

"In 1974, entrepreneur Peter O'Halligan purchased a warehouse on Mathew Street, just yards from the world-famous Cavern Club where The Beatles had made their name, believing it to be the exact spot Jung had envisaged in his dream and set up the Liverpool School of Language, Music, Dream and Pun. (............................)

In 1976, O'Halligan decided to hold the first Jung festival in Liverpool and sent associates Sean Halligan and Denato Cincollo III to Basel in Switzerland to get a special stone, a mismeasured piece used in the construction of his house that Jung insisted on keeping as he felt it had some kind of cosmic significance.

They actually returned with a segment that would have been the back side of the piece of stone that had gone to Jung and this was used to as a support for a bust made by sculptor David Wright. (..........)
The monument was unveiled during the festival in the presence of Jung's great-grandson, Mark Balman and the Swiss Consul General, "

**************************************************
Jung's Liverpool dream is also quoted in detail and worth sharing here:

"I was in Liverpool.

"With a number of Swiss - say half a dozen - I walked through the dark streets.

"The various quarters of the city were arranged radially around the square. In the centre was a round pool, and in the middle of it, a small island. While everything around was obscured by rain, fog, smoke and dimly lit darkness, the little island blazed with sunlight. On it stood a single tree, a magnolia, in a sea of reddish blossoms.

It was as though the tree stood in the sunlight and was, at the same time, the source of light.

My companions commented on the abominable weather, and obviously did not see the tree.

"They spoke of another Swiss who was living in Liverpool, and expressed surprise that he should have settled here. I was carried away by the beauty of the tree and the sunlit island, and thought, “I know very well why he has settled here.” Then I awoke.

"This dream represented my situation at the time. I can still see the greyish-yellow raincoats, glistening with the wetness of the rain.

"Everything was extremely unpleasant, black and opaque - just as I felt then. But I had had a vision of unearthly beauty, and that was why I was able to live at all.

"Liverpool is the ‘pool of life'.

"The ‘liver', according to an old view, is the seat of life - that which “makes to live.”

Full article: https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/fifty-years-death-renowned-thinker-3371889
 

gattino

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He was very very mystical... he reported many paranormal experiences, including a very famous one which purportedly shook Freud, coined the term and concept of Synchronicity, gave the world the notion of Archetypes, studied the I Ching and even wrote about UFOS and astrology.
 
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Mythopoeika

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He was very very mystical... he reported many paranormal experiences, including a very famous one which purportedly shook Freud, coined the term and concept of Sycnronicity, gave the world the notion of Archetypes, studied the I Ching and even wrote about UFOS and astrology.
Fantastic! Note to self: must read more about Carl Jung...
 

gattino

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Fantastic! Note to self: must read more about Carl Jung...
I think its certainly better to read about him than to read him - not that ive done the latter, but my perception is that he wrote about these things in the impenetrable lexicon of the psychoanalyst. He didn't necessarily think of these fortean subjects in the nuts and bolts or ghosts and ghouls way we might, but seems to have seen it all as some kind of real external projection of the unconscious needs of the individual psyche. Even I don't know what I just said there, but that's the kind of terms he appears to have written in.
 

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I've finally got some Jung to read, so I'll see how it goes. I can take pretty much anything except James Joyce, so hopefully they won't become some of the few books I've given up on before completion?
I'm setting myself challenges this year, second hand books being so cheap, and getting into Quantum Mechanics / Chaos theory etc. Even if I only understand 10% of it, it's 10% I didn't have before I started.
CW.
 

Coal

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I never realised that Jung was such a mystical fellow. Thought he was more of a scientist.
Interesting origin story for the college.
You do need to read Jung and view his ideas from a critical standpoint.
 

Swifty

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I'll be off to Cromer's North Lodge Park at 3:30 this afternoon to celebrate Chinese New Year .. a giant water dragon, floating lanterns, art activities (which I expect will be limited to just for kids) and finger food from The Kanton restaurant .. hopefully someone's got a lump hammer to smash the ice on the boating pond.

http://northlodgepark.org.uk/chinese-new-year-celebration/
 

Bad Bungle

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I don't live in Camden but I do work there and every Thursday my Newsagent puts copies of the local freebie Camden New Journal inside my paper. In November 2016 the Royal Veterinary College announced a public dissection of a cheetah. (bring bottle and Bird). I believe this was an autopsy of a big cat that died at the Zoo rather a random find on the streets of Camden. I didn't go but the CNJ kindly printed highlights the next week :

The Vet added: “As we go back, getting my fingers out of the way, we have a little bone at the back of the tongue. And then there’s the hyoid. If you come to a dead body and you find the hyoid has been broken, it probably means the body has been strangled.”

CNJ then felt it necessary to explain to its Readers: The cheetah had not been strangled.

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Yithian

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The square pillar with lots of text on it?
Can't read it.

It's Korean, but written in Hanja, which are (a select set of) Chinese characters.

It's located (alongside two others) directly outside a Confucian school, so I expect it is a memorial to one of the founders or a statement of the school's intent/philosophy.
 

EnolaGaia

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A bit rubbish to be honest, more a thing for young families with young kids.
Then how'd you end up in the Troll's Head basement in a gimp suit? ...

Wait a minute ... You mean the guy in the gimp suit isn't you?!?
 

James_H

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Can't read it.

It's Korean, but written in Hanja, which are (a select set of) Chinese characters.

It's located (alongside two others) directly outside a Confucian school, so I expect it is a memorial to one of the founders or a statement of the school's intent/philosophy.
I saw similar stelae written in Chinese in the Confucian temple/school in Hanoi. They were written in Chinese rather than Vietnamese with Chinese characters (as it used to be written) because Chinese was the language of education throughout most East Asia for a long time.
 

James_H

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Just saw some Indian guru types at the airport wearing bright orange Crocs to match their robes.
 

Yithian

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I saw similar stelae written in Chinese in the Confucian temple/school in Hanoi. They were written in Chinese rather than Vietnamese with Chinese characters (as it used to be written) because Chinese was the language of education throughout most East Asia for a long time.
It's similar in Korea, but there's a key difference: the words/sounds being expressed by Chinese characters are actually Korean, not proper Chinese. And indeed these (pseudo) 'Chinese' characters are not all the same as those used in modern China, they're a set that was incorporated into the Korean language along with Buddhism and traditional literature (a long time ago). The pronounciation has long-since lost its tonality, which complicates matters as much as it simplifies since a great many characters now have the same sound, so the system of learning has in-built clarification (see below).

Any Korean word that is derived from Chinese (a majority) may be rendered in either of two scripts: Hanja-mun (Hanja-characters) or Hanguel (the modern Korean 'alphabet'); the former is logogrammatic while the latter is phonetic and about a billion times easier to learn. They are typically taught in a 'character-meaning-sound' fashion with a combination phrase such as:

人 = 사람 / 인
In = Salam / In​

Many English people will know this one.

'Salam' (사람) is the Korean word for 'person' and 'in' (인) is the name and sound of the 'Chinese' character (the Hanja). There are other 'Chinese' characters also named/pronounced 'in' (인), but this is the one that means person. One is no more archaic that the other and both are intergral to the modern language: "Han salam" (한 사람) means 'one person', but 'Waygookin' (외국) is a foreign-person (foreigner). And, yes, that's the same 'gook' as in the Vietnam movies--the slang was carried over by G.I.s from the Korean War and into Indochina!

Although Hanguel, the everyday phonetic script, was invented in the fifteenth century, it wasn't actually put into widespread use until the twentieth (it become standard to teach it in schools in the late nineteenth century), but its eventual adoption brough soaring literacy rates. Then there are two further complicating factors. First, during the period of the Japanese occupation (1910 to 1945), use of all Korean was discouraged and Japanese became the official language. Second, the country was becoming increasingly unified and regional spellings were slowly disappearing as the century progressed. That said, my mother-in-law, for instance, still uses a great deal of 'dialect' words and phrases (with accompanying irregularities of spelling and pronunciation) that I simply cannot understand--and she's in her late 60s. In spite of this hideous century of flux, Hanguel remains so elegantly easy to learn (you can get a working knowledge of the letters and sounds in a day) that the literacy rate is north of 99%.

Since the 1970s, however, use of Hanja ('Chinese' characters) has been in steady decline, but you still see them regularly in broadsheet newspapers (and all over 'traditional stuff'), and it's pretty much impossible to study the humanities at university without a working knowledge or them--a bit like how a familiarity with Latin (and to a lesser degree Greek) is required for a deep study of the English language or European history.

For myself, I 'know' very few of these characters: small, medium, large; the days of the week; things that appear on packaging like 'without [MSG or Fat]; entrance, mountain, male and female--the ones that always crop up in the same situations and locations. My brother-in-law, in contrast, is a traditional doctor and can translate them freely off the cuff as the stuff you see on shop signs is far simpler than the classical texts he studies.
 
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