Random Stuff From Your Neck O' The Woods

Spudrick68

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Thank you for your kind words. I have an awful lot to learn with this new camera yet.
 

Austin Popper

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Ms Popper has some very wealthy relatives, so we get invited to parties and things we wouldn't otherwise get to attend. They are lovely people, generous and fun. One time at their home, we passed through the kitchen while the luncheon or whatever was being prepared, and the produce didn't quite look real. A bowl of grapes looked like each had been polished. All were perfect in shape and color. They almost glowed. A bit later, when we were out of earshot of anyone else, Ms Popper quietly remarked, "I don't think Aunt Millie shops at the same stores we do."
 

Yithian

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'Prestige produce' (as I have just dubbed it) is often given as a gift in East Asia.

A customer once very generously gave me a presentation basket of ten giant oranges (almost cantaloupe sized), that I later discovered retailed at a bit north of fifty quid.

Each one was perfect and had been grown under strictly controlled conditions on a sub-tropical island off the south coast (according to the blurb).

I've also seen extremely expensive mushrooms come in gift boxes that run to well over a hundred quid. Some of the prices for the very best fish are similarly absurd.
 

Yithian

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Wow, those prices are silly.
I'm always shaking my head at these accounts of Japanese people bidding for a tuna fish and paying a king's ransom for it.
It's less commonly individual 'people' putting in those enormous bids.

The corporate top-bods buy the fish for publicity and to serve at special events for clients.
 

James_H

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Ms Popper has some very wealthy relatives, so we get invited to parties and things we wouldn't otherwise get to attend. They are lovely people, generous and fun. One time at their home, we passed through the kitchen while the luncheon or whatever was being prepared, and the produce didn't quite look real. A bowl of grapes looked like each had been polished. All were perfect in shape and color. They almost glowed. A bit later, when we were out of earshot of anyone else, Ms Popper quietly remarked, "I don't think Aunt Millie shops at the same stores we do."
I've seen bunches of grapes for sale for £40 each in Hong Kong.
 

James_H

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'Prestige produce' (as I have just dubbed it) is often given as a gift in East Asia.

A customer once very generously gave me a presentation basket of ten giant oranges (almost cantaloupe sized), that I later discovered retailed at a bit north of fifty quid.

Each one was perfect and had been grown under strictly controlled conditions on a sub-tropical island off the south coast (according to the blurb).

I've also seen extremely expensive mushrooms come in gift boxes that run to well over a hundred quid. Some of the prices for the very best fish are similarly absurd.
Yithian, this cabbage is from Korea. I blame you.
 

Yithian

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Yithian, this cabbage is from Korea. I blame you.
I reject your blame and am as appalled as you!

That said, they do have the most remarkable hydroponic set-ups for growing stuff all year round.

The classic 'cabbage (bechu) gimchi' is not even my favourite kind--surely this is what the cabbage is for.
I heartily recommend spring-onion (pa) gimchi--it's like pickled onions with chilli.
 
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I didn't pay a King's Ransom for six apples, just €1.12, but they were from South Africa! How does it make sense, economic or environmental transporting apples so far?
 
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maximus otter

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I didn't pay a King's Ransom for six apples, just €1.12, but they were from South Africa! How does it make sense, economic or environmental transporting apples so far?
Quite right! Let’s ban oranges, bananas, pineapples, kiwi fruit, quinoa, soy beans, tofu, açai berries, mung beans, lentils, couscous, pomegranates, rice...

maximus otter
 

Yithian

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Quite right! Let’s ban oranges, bananas, pineapples, kiwi fruit, quinoa, soy beans, tofu, açai berries, mung beans, lentils, couscous, pomegranates, rice...

maximus otter
You can ban açai berries because I don't know what they are.

The rest I'd rather keep, though I can't think of much of worth to use the lentils for.
 
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James_H

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The classic 'cabbage (bechu) gimchi' is not even my favourite kind--surely this is what the cabbage is for.
I heartily recommend spring-onion (pa) gimchi--it's like pickled onions with chilli.
actually I made kimchi today, but following a recipe with cabbage, daikon and spring onions all together. I also added some little dried shrimps because I've heard you can.
 

maximus otter

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I thought apples, like potatoes, can be kept for months in suitable conditions.
Yes, if you build and maintain huge facilities which keep the produce dark, and in the correct temperature and humidity. Then all you have to do is convince punters to buy eight-month old pruney apples. Which, considering that they’ve been conditioned to reject oddly-shaped veg, or eggs with a trace of muck on them, would require the skills of a Don Draper.

Easier to import fresh, delicious produce and help the economy of a poorer country at the same time.

maximus otter
 
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Yes, if you build and maintain huge facilities which keep the produce dark, and in the correct temperature and humidity. Then all you have to do is convince punters to buy eight-month old pruney apples. Which, considering that they’ve been conditioned to reject oddly-shaped veg, or eggs with a trace of muck on them, would require the skills of a Don Draper.

Easier to import fresh, delicious produce and help the economy of a poorer country at the same time.

maximus otter
When civilization falls we'll have to eat vegans and forage off the land. No more coffee, black pepper or imported fruit & veggies.
 

maximus otter

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When civilization falls we'll have to eat vegans and forage off the land. No more coffee, black pepper or imported fruit & veggies.
l’ll leave the vegans for you, ta. My deerstalking cartridges are now about £2.50 each, and l don’t think l’d get that in edible meat off the carcase. Also, all of that sanctimoniousness must affect the flavour.

maximus otter
 
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