Random Stuff From Your Neck O' The Woods

James_H

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Just ran into this guy selling hand lettered stuff from the street. I suspect the metal stencils are for minibus signs, which are usually handlettered and a classic source of vernacular Chinese lettering and strange Romanisation. He was very nice and let me take a picture.

IMG-20190820-WA0005.jpg
 

James_H

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Walking through my village is running a gauntlet of massive guard dogs, flinging themselves against the chainlink fences with slathering jaws.

I was just walking home along an unlit country road when I came across Black Shuck himself, untied and with no accompanying human. I nearly shat myself. He stiffened, growled, let out a huge bark and ... ran as fast as his legs could carry him in the opposite direction.
 

Bad Bungle

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The village of Dinton (Bucks) near me still has its original 16th Century stocks - however they've become rather frail so have been moved into the Church porch when not required. Still quite serviceable as a whipping post with a manacle on the right-hand upright, but I haven't worked out why the stocks have an odd number of holes. Any ideas likely explanations ?

Dinton_Stocks 0438.jpg
 

Bad Bungle

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Noted on this site with some interesting comments but no solution.

Could there have been another hole that rotted away and caused the bars to be abridged?

How often would the stocks be occupied by more than one miscreant anyway?
Fairly certain it was constructed with 5 holes. I keep coming back to the image of a head through the middle, feet on either side and then the arms through the outer holes - but not sure that's anatomically possible. Certainly don't believe Dinton was blessed with 5 one-legged felons.
 

EnolaGaia

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... but I haven't worked out why the stocks have an odd number of holes. Any ideas likely explanations ? ...
For what it's worth ... Stocks were most often used to restrain legs only, though in principle they could also serve to restrain arms. The classic pillory included a hole for the neck, but it was larger than the holes intended to restrain wrists or ankles.

I've found two vintage images (drawings; engravings) of stocks with an odd number of holes.

This first one illustrates two rows of stocks, one of which (as illustrated, intended for the wrists) has 5 holes.

Unknown.jpeg
In this case, the odd number of holes serves to give some flexibility in how the restrained person is locked down.

Another image (a stock image I can't post owing to copyright / usage restrictions) can be viewed at:

https://www.agefotostock.com/age/en/Stock-Images/Rights-Managed/IAM-WHA-091-0389

It also illustrates a set of stocks with two rows of holes, the lower one of which has 9 holes. This image also illustrates one of the prisoners being restrained by only arm and one leg. The applicability of restraining someone by only one arm or leg implies an odd number of holes isn't all that odd.

My guess is that the Dinton stocks happen to have an odd number of holes, and they could be used in different ways to restrain up to 5 prisoners.

I suppose there's also a chance the surviving stocks represent only one row from what was originally a multi-row set of stocks as illustrated in these images.
 
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Bad Bungle

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For what it's worth ... Stocks were most often used to restrain legs only, though in principle they could also serve to restrain arms. The classic pillory included a hole for the neck, but it was larger than the holes intended to restrain wrists or ankles.

I've found two vintage images (drawings; engravings) of stocks with an odd number of holes.

This first one illustrates two rows of stocks, one of which (as illustrated, intended for the wrists) has 5 holes.

In this case, the odd number of holes serves to give some flaxibility in how the restrained person is locked down.

Another image (a stock image I can't post owing to copyright / usage restrictions) can be viewed at:

https://www.agefotostock.com/age/en/Stock-Images/Rights-Managed/IAM-WHA-091-0389

It also illustrates a set of stocks with two rows of holes, the lower one of which has 9 holes. This image also illustrates one of the prisoners being restrained by only arm and one leg. The applicability of restraining someone by only one arm or leg implies an odd number of holes isn't all that odd.

My guess is that the Dinton stocks happen to have an odd number of holes, and they could be used in different ways to restrain up to 5 prisoners.

I suppose there's also a chance the surviving stocks represent only one row from what was originally a multi-row set of stocks as illustrated in these images.
I have found a picture of a 7 hole stock at Bridgerule Church near Bude. I suppose stocks could have been constructed with redundant holes to allow for even wear and tear through alternation. Or maybe you could choose how far the miscreant's legs should be apart, depending on the crime.

http://www.bude-today.co.uk/article...dgerule church&sectionIs=news&searchyear=2019
 

hunck

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I have found a picture of a 7 hole stock at Bridgerule Church near Bude. I suppose stocks could have been constructed with redundant holes to allow for even wear and tear through alternation. Or maybe you could choose how far the miscreant's legs should be apart, depending on the crime.

http://www.bude-today.co.uk/article.cfm?id=112234&headline=Mystery surrounds seven-hole stocks at Bridgerule church&sectionIs=news&searchyear=2019
There are still stocks on Southgate green, London

The Stocks were a coronation gift to the Green in 1953 and are a replacement for an earlier set that went missing during the Second World War.
This is after restoration/replacement of the previous which rotted.

appropriate materials for the project and oak and three hundred year old hand wrought nails were purchased.


The stocks are a fascinating reminder of The Green’s long history. Stocks and pillaries have been in use for more than 1000 years. They were used as a punishment from the Middle Ages up to the eighteenth century. In 1405 a law was passed that required every town and village to have a set of stocks, usually placed by the side of a public highway or village green. Stocks were a status symbol for smaller communities. If a town was too small or could not afford stocks that town was regarded as a hamlet and could not call itself a village. The pillory was only abolished in England around 1837. Stocks were never formally abolished and were used until around 1870.

People who were punished with the use of stocks included traveling musicians, fortune tellers, ballad singers, drunkards, gamblers, revilers, Sabbath breakers, vagrants, wife beaters, unruly servants and petty thieves. Some of the more regular occupants of stocks and pillories were shopkeepers and market stallholders who cheated their customers. For example, giving short change or measure, selling poor quality merchandise. The punishment was often made to fit the crime. A butcher who sold rotten meat would be pilloried with the offending product tied around his neck. An alewife who watered down her beer would have it poured over her head while she sat in the stocks. Often the punishment depended on the mood of the mob. Daniel DeFoe, for example, was put in the pillory for satirizing the government. The crowd brought him food and water and showered him with flower petals.
 

JamesWhitehead

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The pillory, especially, could be a death-sentence, if the crowd was in a bitter mood. There was no opportunity for the miscreant to protect his head and face from whatever the crowd threw. The authorities were aware that using the pillory to punish popular figures could backfire.

Murderers and highwaymen, however, could expect the full fury of the mob to be unleashed. "Sodomites" could expect no better in a world of institutional homophobia.:cskull:
 

Analogue Boy

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This is literally the crapp we have to put up with around here....

A PROTEST against proposed ‘rip-off’ parking permit price hikes took place at Rugby Town Hall yesterday (Thursday September 26).
Campaign group Concerned Rugbeians Against Parking Proposals (CRAPP) staged the peaceful protest ahead of a Rugby Borough Council (RBC) council meeting, to urge borough councillors to take their concerns to Warwickshire County Council (WCC).
And the council responded by passing a motion, proposed by Labour Group leader Coun Maggie O’Rourke, to ask WCC to reconsider the changes due to a “detrimental impact on local people’s lives”.

https://rugbyobserver.co.uk/news/campaign-group-protests-against-rip-off-parking-permit-price-hikes/
It would take me weeks to make up the sort of shit my local paper shoves through my letterbox as news.
 

Swifty

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Someone's written this amusing enough review of a pub in Cromer I used to work in ..;





You cant imagine, so let me set the scene...

An autumnal evening in early september, slight chill in the air, a beauty of a walk and a thirst in need of quenching.
as we ambled round the quite agreeable "gem of the Norfolk coast" drawn to the warm lights and industrial wooden tables of the Kings Head beer garden...like a mirage in the hottest of deserts and a safe port in the roughest of seas. we were sure our night would continue to be one too remember...

IT WAS...NO! IT REALLY WAS.

Was it the stench of drains, filthy fryer oil you ask...possible?,
could it have been that my hands were instantly bonded to the bar with the amount of spilt post mix...probable?
was it the youth club shouting and swearing on the sofa next to the bar...well maybe
or was it...

.. so we got our drinks and made our way to the haven of the calming garden...
blissfull... well until the frosted mens toilet window we were sitting opposite, a figure appeared, like a dark cloud on the sunniest of days. and proceded to empty a bag and inhale whatever he decided upon this fateful night, as clear as day...
well my fellow readers and loyal associates this was the interesting bit of my experience.
 

Yithian

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I had cause to tell somebody today that in Korea it's a minor (modern-ish) tradition to have takeaway Chinese food delivered on the day you move home.

Everybody I know seems to do it and they feed friends and relatives who have been lending a hand.

Moving is usually conducted over a single (long) day, during which stopping to cook is impractical.

Some of the removal teams even hand out discount coupons for local restaurants.

It's almost always: jjajangmyeon (black-bean noodles) and tangsuyuk (sweet & sour pork or beef), mandu (dumplings) or jjampong (really spicy seafood stew).
 

gordonrutter

There must be a set character limit to this opt...
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A double stroke of luck on my nocturnal perambulation: the randomly appearing takoyaki stall was there and the owner of our local shop gave my daughter a set of Moomins figures, presumably because we are regular customers.

View attachment 19971
Photos or it didn’t happen, can never have too much moomin.
 

Yithian

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I've been out and about with the family today and tried out my new phone's camera. The night-time shots are far superior to what my previos phone could manage. The temple is fairly local and my daughter always insists that we 'go and see Buddha' when we eat at the nearby acorn restaurant. It's illuminated from dusk til dawn and slightly otherworldly. The film crew we found in a playground (they're working on a forthcoming TV drama), and the apartmemt blocks, although unremarkable, are where I currently live (although my actual building is out of shot).

SmartSelect_20190929-194753_Gallery.jpg SmartSelect_20190929-194848_Gallery.jpg SmartSelect_20190929-194910_Gallery.jpg SmartSelect_20190929-195002_Gallery.jpg SmartSelect_20190929-195144_Gallery.jpg SmartSelect_20190929-195040_Gallery.jpg
 
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