Random Stuff From Your Neck O' The Woods

Lord Lucan

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They wouldn't dare knock it down if he were alive...
Is that in Kowloon Tong? I remember being driven past it in the early 80's and it being pointed out to me. As a huge fan, it was a momentous occasion for me, even though it was only for a moment or so.
 

James_H

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Is that in Kowloon Tong? I remember being driven past it in the early 80's and it being pointed out to me. As a huge fan, it was a momentous occasion for me, even though it was only for a moment or so.
Yep, quite near my workplace. Apparently Chow Yun Fat lives on the same road. Kowloon tong is a funny place: expensive kindergartens, love hotels, driving schools and mansions of the rich and famous all crammed together. The area also reminds me more of the UK than anywhere else in Hong Kong due to the low-rise buildings and wide, quiet streets.
 

Swifty

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I'm really surprised that it wasn't turned into a museum.
It would have had one of those heritage blue circles on the wall by now in England. I'm pretty sure I've seen pics of him training Norris in what used to be the back yard there.
 

James_H

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I'm really surprised that it wasn't turned into a museum.
Hong Kong heritage museum have a standing exhibition about Lee which takes up a whole floor, so I guess there's competition. Also Lee was mainly resident in the USA, I think he probably just had a house here because he could. Kind of an overseas second home.
 

James_H

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My second dead snake in the road. This was a small bamboo pit viper - venomous, but not deadly. Very bright green.
 

Swifty

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Lifeboat going someone may have to cover brekkie

then ..

Don't worry, will be back by 3

Our head chef's also a Cromer lifeboat man so sometimes has to drop everything when his pager goes off. I was off work yesterday, I've just read that on our company's group chat.
 

Yithian

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Went for a walk today. It was pretty warm given that we're now into November (no jacket required).

The park--one of two side by side--is on the bank of the Han River and (I'm told) was created via a massive landfill programme (425 steps to reach the main path!). Considering that and the presence of a giant plant for providing heated water to the city (a whole pressurised underwater system--why don't we have this in the UK?), it's a rather lovely spot and, now, a wildlife sanctuary. Despite a large number of people milling about, the main sound to be heard was that of thousands of crickets competing with hundreds of birds.

It kept on threatening to rain but never quite managed it. We left shortly after discovering 'The Wicker Pheasant' and walked down in that lovely half-light you get with the dying of the day.

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Lord Lucan

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Venomous snakes? If so, how deadly? What's the other animal's silhouette? Mongoose? Otter? A kind of cat?
 

Yithian

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Venomous snakes? If so, how deadly? What's the other animal's silhouette? Mongoose? Otter? A kind of cat?
Snakes are relatively common in Korea, but there are only four or five types that are potentially deadly. Three of these are vipers: more likely to cause a painful swelling to the fit and healthy, but they could do away with children or the elderly. They also have adders and Tiger Keelbacks here.

We also had the discussion about what that weasel-type thing was and agreed that we'd personally never seen any such creature, but the Internet tells me that there are weasels here in low-ish numbers.

The sign, we suspect, depicts a marten--but I've never even heard of anybody who has seen one. I suspect they live solely in the mountains today.

Yellow-throated marten:

The yellow-throated marten is a fearless animal with few natural predators, because of its powerful build, bright coloration and unpleasant odor. It shows little fear of humans or dogs, and is easily tamed.

These chaps:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow-throated_marten
 

CarlosTheDJ

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History and background to the Sussex and west Kent Autumn shenanigans - as someone who didn't grow up in the area I found this illuminating. (Like a banger in the face.)


Guy Fawkes Night: Why is bonfire such a big deal in Sussex?

To some, Bonfire Night represents an excuse to set off some fireworks. But it is perhaps in the south east of England that memories of Guy Fawkes and his failed bid to blow up King James I burn brightest.

The festivities are about far more than one night though. The Sussex Bonfire season starts on the first weekend of September and ends in the third week of November.

Bonfire societies from towns around Sussex and the western edges of Kent capitalise on the fact the events are staggered across several weeks to take part in each other's parades and the biggest nights attract crowds of several thousand.

Flaming torches, costumes and effigies of celebrities are as much a part of the spectacle as fireworks and the almost cult-like Bonfire season is a key part of the calendar in a manner that may seem bizarre to those elsewhere in the country. But why is it such a big deal?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-50264867
 

James_H

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History and background to the Sussex and west Kent Autumn shenanigans - as someone who didn't grow up in the area I found this illuminating. (Like a banger in the face.)


Guy Fawkes Night: Why is bonfire such a big deal in Sussex?

To some, Bonfire Night represents an excuse to set off some fireworks. But it is perhaps in the south east of England that memories of Guy Fawkes and his failed bid to blow up King James I burn brightest.

The festivities are about far more than one night though. The Sussex Bonfire season starts on the first weekend of September and ends in the third week of November.

Bonfire societies from towns around Sussex and the western edges of Kent capitalise on the fact the events are staggered across several weeks to take part in each other's parades and the biggest nights attract crowds of several thousand.

Flaming torches, costumes and effigies of celebrities are as much a part of the spectacle as fireworks and the almost cult-like Bonfire season is a key part of the calendar in a manner that may seem bizarre to those elsewhere in the country. But why is it such a big deal?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-50264867
I used to enjoy going to the fucked-up festivities at Lewes when I lived in Sussex - they have something of the feeling of a Nuremberg Rally x Wicker Man mashup run on scrumpy. It hit me right in the twittens. But I remember some of the bonfire societies' websites used to give off a strong 'not for outsiders' vibe.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I used to enjoy going to the fucked-up festivities at Lewes when I lived in Sussex - they have something of the feeling of a Nuremberg Rally x Wicker Man mashup run on scrumpy. It hit me right in the twittens. But I remember some of the bonfire societies' websites used to give off a strong 'not for outsiders' vibe.
I haven't been for years, it was a thing to experience for the couple of years I lived in the town. But, yeah - they don't like strangers in these parts.

Still work in Lewes, and I'm just about to head for the hills before the roads close and the lock-down begins.
 

Yithian

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Spent the night in a tent in Kapyong, a place that might be known to some people as the site of a famous British and Commonwealth battle in 1951.

The teepee, alas, was not mine, but lazy campers can rent them and in the dead of night they looked gloriously cosy from without. The site was beside a river and the scenery, as you can see, very autumnal. We went out in that retro-looking speedboat and got up to some fairly impressive speeds, the pilot throwing it this way and that to entertain my daughter and frighten my wife.


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Dinobot

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Spent the night in a tent in Kapyong, a place that might be known to some people as the site of a famous British and Commonwealth battle in 1951.

The teepee, alas, was not mine, but lazy campers can rent them and in the dead of night they looked gloriously cosy from without. The site was beside a river and the scenery, as you can see, very autumnal. We went out in that retro-looking speedboat and got up to some fairly impressive speeds, the pilot throwing it this way and that to entertain my daughter and frighten my wife.


View attachment 20989
The tent is a UFO! Take me with you!
 
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