Reattachments Of Severed Body Parts

Mighty_Emperor

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Just a thread for stories about people having stuff sticthed back on.

Surgeons reattach hand severed in brawl

February 29, 2004 - 6:34PM



A medical team of 12 doctors and nurses worked for eight hours to reattach a young man's hand after it was severed by a sword or a machete during a wild brawl involving up to 40 people.

The doctors from Melbourne's St Vincent's Hospital worked through the night on the 21-year-old's limb and were today confident he would regain the use of his left hand.

Micro-surgeon Tony Berger said the complex operation involved identifying and reattaching the bones, tendons, nerves and blood vessels in the hand and the wrist.

"The potential for restoring function is very great," he said.

"Nerve function is never perfect after such an injury, so he will have some problems with sensation but from a function point of view he should certainly get back to work and enjoy most of his normal activities."

The brawl developed near Albert Street in East Melbourne about 7pm (AEDT) yesterday.

The man's hand was rushed to hospital after it was found by police who combed the area.

Police believe the man's hand was severed by a sword or machete during the brawl.

Dr Berger the man had a very good chance of recovery, because he got to hospital quickly after the injury and the hand was severed in a clean cut, making it easier to reattach.

A team of up to 12 doctors and nurses worked in rotation in the marathon operation that involved three micro-surgeons, two specialist nurses, one anaesthetist, a back-up anaesthetist and several nurses.

"There is some concern over the next few days that the blood vessels may clot off and for that reason he is resting in hospital with anti-coagulant drugs," Dr Berger said.

"After 48 hours that risk is gone and then we need to let the wounds heal and make sure there is no infection."

He said the man would remain in hospital for another week and then would need to undergo extensive physiotherapy.

Assistant Commissioner Simon Overland, who heads the Victoria Police crime department, said between 20 to 40 men from two groups were involved in the brawl.

No motive for the clash had yet been established, he said.

Police who found the hand also found a sword in the gardens, although it was not yet clear whether it was the weapon used in the attack.

"We just need to keep this in perspective," he said.

"They were two groups of Asian men and there's always a tendency to want to conclude from something like this that we have some sort of unchecked problem with Asian gangs in Melbourne.

"The fact is we don't."

The crime department boss said a major investigation last year had given police a "good strategic assessment of the types of problems that we're likely to face with Asian gangs in Melbourne".

"It's given us a very good understanding of the way these gangs work, the composition of the gangs and more importantly the sorts of techniques that we can use against them," he said.

Police have already spoken to some witnesses from last night's attack and were appealing for more to come forward.

No arrests have been made.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/29/1077989429942.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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This is just painful:

April 26, 2004

Dog bites eyelid, LSU reattaches it


(New Orleans-AP) -- She was home alone, putting her dog in its kennel when it snapped at her and bit her right upper eyelid.

Alyssa Kieff pulled back. The lid ripped off. Kieff, of Marrero, had the presence of mind to put the lid on ice. Then she had to wait an hour for an ambulance -- her call was listed just as a dog bite, not a missing eyelid.

An LSU Health Science Center microsurgeon, on call at West Jefferson Medical Center, sewed the lid back on. LSU and renowned microsurgeon Harry Buncke say it was a medical first.

It kept Kieff from needing a more complex series of operations to create a new lid. It took six hours for a team led by Doctor Kamran Khoobehi to sew the lid back together, rebuilding a damaged tear duct and connecting blood vessels with sutures only barely smaller than the capillaries themselves.
http://www.katc.com/Global/story.asp?S=1815624&nav=EyAzMbKe
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Friday, August 6, 2004
Glen Cove

Doctors reattach man's severed hand




BY ISABELLE HOOLEY
STAFF WRITER

August 5, 2004


It happened so fast, in a flash of steel and blood, that for a split-second all he could do was reel in pain and clutch his bleeding right limb to his chest.

Marcel DiMaggio was using a circular saw to cut a board for a cabinet he was building in his parents' garage last Wednesday night, when he suddenly lost control of the machine. As a horrible pain spread through his arm, DiMaggio, a grounds keeper for the Jericho schools, knew he'd cut himself, probably badly.

"All of a sudden the whole door [to the garage] was pounding," said Charles DiMaggio, Marcel's father. "And there he was, screaming, 'Take me to the hospital.'"

"What did you cut, two fingers?" Charles DiMaggio said as they sped from the home Marcel shares with his parents in Glen Cove to North Shore University Hospital at Glen Cove. But Marcel, 35, was hysterical and the car was dark.

When they stepped into the hospital's emergency room, DiMaggio saw for himself.

Marcel had no hand.

DiMaggio sped the four minutes back to his home, praying the whole way. His wife, Angela DiMaggio, wanted to know why he was back so soon.

"I've got to get the hand," he said.

She screamed and he ran into the garage to retrieve it where it lay on the floor.

Back at the hospital, medics packed the hand in ice before loading it and DiMaggio into an ambulance for transfer to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow. Within minutes of arriving at NUMC, DiMaggio was in surgery.

Dr. Michael Stracher, an orthopedic surgeon trained in limb reattachment, said he'd done many fingers but never a hand.

"When we got the call, I said, 'We better get the team together,'" Stracher recalled, adding that only a few surgeons on Long Island are trained for the procedure, sometimes called replant surgery. The surgeries tend to occur more frequently in rural areas where there is lots of farm machinery, Stracher said.

Stracher and his team of about six surgeons and assistants worked for about 18 hours, he said, using a microscope to reattach fibers with sutures that were at times as fine as a hair. After sewing together tendons and blood vessels, they took tissue from DiMaggio's left ankle to reattach a nerve in his wrist.

Surgeons said Marcel's hand was so swollen they could not sew it shut completely, so they took skin grafts from his left thigh to place on both sides of his wrist. When the swelling goes down and the skin heals, the transplanted skin will contract, they said.

The reattachment of the tissues was made easier by the cut's clean lines, Stracher said.

Marcel, whose last pain-hazed memory before surgery was sucking air through an anesthesia mask, awoke on Friday.

"From the very time I woke up, I could move [my fingers]," he said yesterday morning as he was being discharged from the hospital. As he spoke, his swollen and slightly yellowed fingers wiggled above a foam pad and a series of steel pins inserted for temporary support because the circular saw shattered some of his wrist bones.

The pins will be replaced in a few weeks by a permanent plate for structural support, said Stracher. It means DiMaggio won't get back full flexibility and mobility of his hand. But in a year or so he should be using it in a limited fashion, Stracher said.

Yesterday, just before DiMaggio went home, Stracher shook his injured hand for a photo opportunity.

"I feel the pressure, it's tingling right now," DiMaggio said, smiling. As he left the hospital, he was asked if he planned to finish the cabinet.

"Yeah," he said, nodding his head emphatically. "When I get better, I plan to finish."

Hands-on surgery

Surgeons at Nassau University Medical Center reattached the severed right hand of Glen Cove resident Marcel DiMaggio in a complicated 18-hour procedure.

1. ACCIDENT

While making a cabinet, DiMaggio severs his right hand at the wrist with a circular saw. The proximal carpal bones are "obliterated,'' according to a surgeon.

Preparation

One team of surgeons evaluates the hand; another evaluates the stump.

2. SURGERY

External fixators, or pins, are attached to the radius and ulnar bones in the arm and the metacarpal bones in the wrist.

Plastic surgeons then reattach the radial artery, allowing blood to .flow back into hand and preserving tissue.

Radial artery, ulnar artery, veins, tendons and nerves are sewn back together. The sural nerve from DiMaggio's left ankle is transplanted to replace the ulnar nerve in his wrist.

Two 5-by-5 cm. pieces of his left thigh are transplanted onto both sides of his wrist.

3. POST-SURGERY

In two weeks, a metal plate will replace external fixators in wrist area. He faces lengthy rehabilitation.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/l...,0,6611146.story?coll=ny-topstories-headlines
 

EnolaGaia

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This successful reattachment was done almost a day after the injury - a new record for time elapsed.
Surgeons Successfully Reattach Man's Penis Nearly a Day After It Was Cut Off

Surgeons in the United Kingdom have reattached a man's penis nearly a day after it was cut off, the longest documented time the organ has been without a blood supply and still successfully replanted.

Six weeks after the operation, the young man's urethra was not only working once again, sensation had also returned to his penis. Thanks to a carefully reattached artery and vein, the patient was even able to achieve a full erection.

"The success of this case therefore should encourage surgeons to attempt penile replantation, even with prolonged ischaemia [loss of blood supply] time, due to possible success and the potential physical and psychosocial effects of organ loss for the patient," write surgeons from the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

Penile reattachment, or replantation, is rare - only a hundred or so have been recorded in the medical literature. But when amputations occur, it's important to move quickly to give the replanted tissue the best chance of survival. ...

A medical case reported more than two decades ago describes a 4-year-old's penis being successfully reattached 18 hours after the initial injury. Generally, after a day of being separated, the success rates of replantation are very low. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/surgeo...man-s-penis-nearly-a-day-after-it-was-cut-off
 

AnonyJoolz

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My uncle had his big toe almost completely cut off in a work accident, when he arrived at the local large hospital it turned out that a specialist in micro-surgery was visiting to train surgeons to reattach digits, this was IIRC the mid 1970s. A very lucky chance! He had his toe reattached in a crowded operating theatre :)
 
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