Red Mercury

Ffalstaf

Devoted Cultist
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#31
rynner2 said:
The Singer sewing machines are said to contain traces of red mercury, a substance that may not exist.
How ridiculous. Everyone knows it's Husqvarnas that contain red mercury. Singers contain monopasium 239.
 

KarlD

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#32
wembley8 said:
"I thought 'red mercury' was another name for cinnebar"

It may be that as well, but it is also the nickname of a mysterious substance allegedly manufactured in Russian nuclear reactors that has nothing to do with conventional mercury.
Its made by triple filtering bullshit.
ive got an email from someone in Nigeria who says he can get hold of some.
 
Joined
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#33
KarlD said:
wembley8 said:
"I thought 'red mercury' was another name for cinnebar"

It may be that as well, but it is also the nickname of a mysterious substance allegedly manufactured in Russian nuclear reactors that has nothing to do with conventional mercury.
Its made by triple filtering bullshit.
Well that certainly cuts to the chase.
 

Nemo

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#36
Does this go here?

'Red mercury': why does the myth persist?

For centuries rumours have persisted about a powerful and mysterious substance. And these days, adverts and videos offering it for sale can be found online. Why has the story of "red mercury" endured?
Some people believe it's a magical healing elixir found buried in the mouths of ancient Egyptian mummies.
Or could it be a powerful nuclear material that might bring about the apocalypse?
Videos on YouTube extol its vampire-like properties. Others claim it can be found in vintage sewing machines or in the nests of bats.
There's one small problem with these tales - the substance doesn't actually exist. Red mercury is a red herring.
(c) BBC '19.
 
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