Rest In Peace: The R.I.P. Thread

Mythopoeika

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Well, that's what her brother said in the quote I read. I guess he'd know.
Care to re-quote it? Thanks.
I think 'quadriplegic' is an issue that makes somebody vulnerable.
 

Tribble

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FrKadash

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escargot

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Phil May, frontman of riotous band the Pretty Things who were acclaimed peers of David Bowie and the Rolling Stones, has died aged 75.

He died in hospital in King’s Lynn, Norfolk, from complications following hip surgery after a cycling accident, that are not related to coronavirus.


https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/may/15/phil-may-frontman-with-the-pretty-things-dies-aged-75
Awful news, can remember seeing them perform Singapore Silk Torpedo on t'Whistle Test. Bought the album as soon as I could.
 

hunck

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I saw the Pretty Things in a pub not far from me all of 20 years ago & bloody good they were too.
 

Tribble

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Mythopoeika

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Fred Willard, the prolific and beloved comic actor and master of the mockumentary genre who stood out in ensemble comedies like Best in Show, For Your Consideration and This Is Spinal Tap, died Friday at the age of 86.

Willard’s rep Glenn Schwartz confirmed his death to Rolling Stone, adding that the cause of death was natural causes.


https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-news/fred-willard-best-in-show-actor-dead-obit-1000942/

That guy! I remember him from the Anchorman films. RIP.
 

EnolaGaia

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Fred Willard did innumerable small guest appearances on various shows - especially sketch comedy interviews on talk shows - as any of a myriad zany / insane / over-enthusiastic / out of touch / snake oil peddling interviewees.

He was a master at playing the charmingly oblivious fellow who was either "not all there" or "not with it."

He's one of the rare "that guy" performers who evolved into a beloved name-brand all his own.

RIP, Fred ...
 

Naughty_Felid

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Fred Willard did innumerable small guest appearances on various shows - especially sketch comedy interviews on talk shows - as any of a myriad zany / insane / over-enthusiastic / out of touch / snake oil peddling interviewees.

He was a master at playing the charmingly oblivious fellow who was either "not all there" or "not with it."

He's one of the rare "that guy" performers who evolved into a beloved name-brand all his own.

RIP, Fred ...
There are many actors who have played dim characters but it takes something to play the obliviously dim with charm, dignity, or innocence.

There are others - Ballard Berkely, (the Major from Fawlty Towers), Esma Cannon, (Various Carry On - the dotty old lady), Liz Smith, Roger Lloyd-Pack all the way back to Arthur Houseman from the early talkies - dignified but very drunk. The master, of course, was Stan Laurel.
 

GNC

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Fred Willard, the prolific and beloved comic actor and master of the mockumentary genre who stood out in ensemble comedies like Best in Show, For Your Consideration and This Is Spinal Tap, died Friday at the age of 86.

Willard’s rep Glenn Schwartz confirmed his death to Rolling Stone, adding that the cause of death was natural causes.


https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-news/fred-willard-best-in-show-actor-dead-obit-1000942/

Paul Reubens could have learned a thing or two from Fred about being caught masturbating in a porno theatre and emerging just as beloved as before. Really funny guy. RIP.
 

EnolaGaia

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I see the great comic actor Roy Kinnear's daughter died of the virus recently. She was in her 40s with no other issues.
No other issues?
Well, that's what her brother said in the quote I read. I guess he'd know.
Here's Rory Kinnear's essay about his sister Karina's passing ...

https://www.theguardian.com/comment...r-protect-vulnerable-coronavirus-rory-kinnear

Her brother didn't say she had no other issues - he mentioned her intrinsically diminished lung capacity and prior kidney problems. He explicitly conceded she was "vulnerable." Her COVID-19 infection attacked her stomach and her kidneys in addition to her lungs.

His point was that she had repeatedly and surprisingly survived prior life-threatening incidents, and her death couldn't be explained away solely in terms of her pre-existing conditions.
 

Bigphoot2

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Bletchley Park codebreaker who helped change course of World War II dies aged 97
Tributes have been paid to Ann Mitchell, one of the last remaining Bletchley Park codebreakers, whose mathematical prowess helped change the course of World War II.
By Martyn Mclaughlin
Sunday, 17th May 2020, 7:30 am

The veteran, who spent more than 20 months helping to decipher German codes at the top secret facility, died on Monday at an Edinburgh care home. She was 97, and had tested positive for Covid-19 shortly before her death.
In peacetime, Mitchell produced pioneering research into the impacts of divorce on children, work which would shape and inform legislative reform in Scotland. But it was decades previously, while barely out of her teenage years, that she played an integral role in bringing about that peace, thanks to her work in Hut 6, a ramshackle wooden structure home to some of Bletchley Park’s brightest minds.
etc
https://www.edinburghnews.scotsman....ange-course-world-war-ii-dies-aged-97-2855511
 

Victory

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I recall being grimly fascinated by a documentary in which Giles Coren and Sue Perkins attempted to adopt the diet of an Edwardian gentleman for a week: the variety and quantity of food consumed was awe-inspiring, and I recall noting that breakfast roughly probably mirrored my own calorie intake for a typical day. They were doing 5000+ per day.

[/MEDIA]
It's a very watchable series, both to see what people used to eat, and that in some of the programmes if I remember correctly Giles Coren and Sue Perkins were medically tested before and after each week's diet, to see what effects it had on them?
I think the Edwardian diet would have lead to Coren developing gout?
 

Ogdred Weary

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I recall being grimly fascinated by a documentary in which Giles Coren and Sue Perkins attempted to adopt the diet of an Edwardian gentleman for a week: the variety and quantity of food consumed was awe-inspiring, and I recall noting that breakfast roughly probably mirrored my own calorie intake for a typical day. They were doing 5000+ per day.

Those who ate like this were often pretty active and had long and very regular days--all of which would help the body--but, by God, you can see why they felt the need to go out and conquer; they must have been bubbling over with unexpended energy.

Not Edwardian but a quote from Dan Simmons' Drood which is largely about Dickens but features Wilkie Collins who writes:

“I settled down to my solitary meal. I enjoyed coming to this club because of how the chef here prepared lark pudding, which I considered one of the four great works produced by my present age. Tonight I decided to dine relatively lightly and ordered two types of pate, soup, some sweet lobsters, a bottle of dry champagne, a leg of mutton stuffed with oysters and minced onions, two orders of asparagus, some braised beef, a bit of dressed crab, and a side of eggs.”

I can't find a reference but I'm sure I had already read/heard the quote from documentary on Collins taken from either his correspondence or diaries. I dread to think what he would consider a heavy meal.
 

Tempest63

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“I settled down to my solitary meal. I enjoyed coming to this club because of how the chef here prepared lark pudding, which I considered one of the four great works produced by my present age. Tonight I decided to dine relatively lightly and ordered two types of pate, soup, some sweet lobsters, a bottle of dry champagne, a leg of mutton stuffed with oysters and minced onions, two orders of asparagus, some braised beef, a bit of dressed crab, and a side of eggs.”
The inspiration for Mr Creosote possibly?
 

GNC

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Michel Piccoli has passed at the age of 94.

For years one of the most prolific and accomplished of European actors. RIP. :(
Great actor, and having seen him interviewed, a thoroughly decent man too. For Forteans, check him out in Themroc, which has dialogue replaced with grunts and was a Channel 4 Red Triangle film (the first, I think!). Also a favourite of Luis Bunuel. RIP.
 

Tribble

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Bad Bungle

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In local news: Dave Brooks, died from a heart attack aged 72, was known as the "Bagpiper of Hamstead Heath". After being prevented from playing his pipes by bylaws prohibiting musical instruments on the open space, he took the City of London to court in 1996, arguing his pipes were actually "an instrument of war". He told magistrates how in the 18th Century a Scottish piper called James Reid was convicted of treason, though he did not carry anything but his pipes during the 1745 rebellion - hence legal precedent ruled they were not a musical instrument. In response, the court told Mr Brook that if this correct, he could be charged with carrying an offensive weapon - and the penalty would be a prison sentence rather than just a fine. A compromise was reached and he was told he could play at the Parliament Hill bandstand three times a week instead.
Leading a colourful life, (if his stories are to be believed) Mr Brooks ran away from home to join the Merchant Navy aged 14 but was sent home, Two years later he signed up and saw the world. When his ship docked in Tasmania, he decided to see the sights. He stole a car and was shocked when a huge number of Police aggressively gave chase in what he considered an overreaction. It transpired that he had stolen a policeman's ride - which had the contents of the station's weekly barbecue in its boot.

I never knew him but already miss him.

http://camdennewjournal.com/article...to-court-for-right-to-play-on-hampstead-heath
 

cycleboy2

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I never knew him in life, but Rest In Peace, Randall Jacobs.

View attachment 26430
I read an obit/feature in the Guardian yesterday that resonated with me in a similar way – I'd never met or even heard of Brian Aubusson, but having lived in Australia for a year and with many Aussie friends, I can appreciate his life. One that was very well lived.
 
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