Rest In Peace: The R.I.P. Thread

escargot

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CP Lee (Manchester music legend Alberto y Lost Trios Paranoias) RIP


We are shocked to hear that Manchester music scene legend CP Lee died today. The driving force behind Alberto y Lost Trios Paranoias was 70 years old and a legend on the city’s music scene. Born in Didsbury in 1950 he was a writer, broadcaster, lecturer and performer who sixties band Greasy Bear. also featured the legendary Bruce Mitchell on drums.
 

GNC

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Sad about Peter Green, he kept a low profile after leaving FM, but he could have been a global superstar if he hadn't been so troubled. RIP.

CP Lee is a shock, very funny man, remember hearing him interviewed regularly on the radio years ago. RIP to him as well.
 

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Not familiar with the sound but he rocks the look - you know he's alright. Wil listen away.
They had an almost-hit with their Status Quo spoof Heads Down No Nonsense Mindless Boogie in 1978. Also, CP was a witness to the Dylan "JUDAS!" moment at Manchester Free Trade Hall.
 

Cloudbusting

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Ahhhh Peter Green... I'm sad to hear that, he was very talented. I first loved Fleetwood Mac for rumours/tusk/tango in the night etc. However discovering their earlier era with Peter Green was like finding a whole other amazing band to explore, a bit of a revelation really. RIP.
 

Lord Lucan

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Regis Philbin, a great of American T.V has passed away just shy of his 89th birthday...

Regis Philbin, American TV host who spent 17,000 hours in front of camera, dies of natural causes at age of 88

regis.jpg


American TV host Regis Philbin, who logged more hours in front of the camera than anyone else in the history of US television on shows like Who Wants to be a Millionaire, has died aged 88.

Key points:
  • Philbin died of natural causes, according to his family, one month before his 89th birthday
  • Guinness World Records listed Philbin as having put in about 17,000 hours on television
  • He was paid $28 million a year in 2000, the most ever for a game-show host
People magazine said Philbin died of natural causes one month before his 89th birthday, citing a statement by his family.

"His family and friends are forever grateful for the time we got to spend with him for his warmth, his legendary sense of humour, and his singular ability to make every day into something worth talking about," the statement said.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-26/regis-philbin-american-tv-host-dies-at-age-of-88/12492894
 

EnolaGaia

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Comfortably Numb

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RIP to one of the greats
I wasn't aware of this, until just seeing your post there.

I had the extraordinary privilege of standing mere feet in front of the guy for an entire gig, when his band astonishingly played in a local Galashiels pub some, 16-18 or so years back.

I was on a bus which briefly stopped in traffic outside the pub, when I noticed their poster advertising what I presumed to be a tribute band.

When realised otherwise... straight off the bus to check I wasn't mistaken.

I believe circumstances were something along the lines of them having a sudden spare date, due to a cancellation elsewhere and through mutual friends /agents, they were offered this alternative at short notice.

Such was Peter Green's majestic touch of feeling for playing blues, BB King remarked that Green was the only blues guitarist who ever made him shiver...

RIP at last fellow and thanks for the wonderful legacy...

 

EnolaGaia

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... I first loved Fleetwood Mac for rumours/tusk/tango in the night etc. However discovering their earlier era with Peter Green was like finding a whole other amazing band to explore, a bit of a revelation really. RIP.
It was the reverse for me ... I was a fan of the original Fleetwood Mac, and I was quite skeptical when first encountering the mid-Seventies incarnation with an entirely different motif.

As you said, it was like finding a wholly distinct band to explore ... If anything, I still consider them to be entirely different acts.

RiP Peter ...
 

Yithian

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I wasn't aware of this, until just seeing your post there.

I had the extraordinary privilege of standing mere feet in front of the guy for an entire gig, when his band astonishingly played in a local Galashiels pub some, 16-18 or so years back.

I was on a bus which briefly stopped in traffic outside the pub, when I noticed their poster advertising what I presumed to be a tribute band.

When realised otherwise... straight off the bus to check I wasn't mistaken.

I believe circumstances were something along the lines of them having a sudden spare date, due to a cancellation elsewhere and through mutual friends /agents, they were offered this alternative at short notice.

Such was Peter Green's majestic touch of feeling for playing blues, BB King remarked that Green was the only blues guitarist who ever made him shiver...

RIP at last fellow and thanks for the wonderful legacy...

He had a lot of talents, but I always admired his phrasing--especially live.

He'd hold back at times and appear a split-second after your brain had raised an eye-brow as if to ask, "Surely he's going to come in here?" It made his lead parts extremely satisfying, because you asked for and then received.

And then, in contrast, he'd do things like 'punctuate' a series of faster runs with something slow and sultry, telling you that you don't need what you thought you needed--he's got something better.
 

Rerenny

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So sorry to hear of the death of Peter Green. Forever grateful of his extraordinary talent, and especially for his gift of this gorgeous, heartbreaking song:
 

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CP Lee was a Film Studies lecturer at Salford University. I went to a symposium he held on the fillum Performance. He went into detail about occult references in the work, starting the event with a loud chant which made the audience jump and and was apparently an invocation of some kind used by the Order of the Golden Dawn or summat. He knew his stuff!
 

escargot

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Tremendous age.
Yup, a good innings and plenty of recognition in her lifetime. Reputedly a sweet character too.

My old dear spotted her in London once and did that 'did I REALLY see HER?' double-take.

When she looked round Miss de Havilland was smiling back at her. Mother swooned!
 

GNC

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Sad to hear John Saxon and Olivia de Havilland left us on the same day, I know they had amazing lives well lived, but it does make me sentimental when I hear of the passing of those stars. I first noticed Saxon in Battle Beyond the Stars, the best of the Star Wars rip-offs, he was a fantastic villain (strangling himself!), and he was always good despite some pretty shoddy material as he went on.

Olivia will always be the best Maid Marian, no shrinking violet but a forthright, no-nonsense heroine, the perfect match for Robin Hood as played by Errol Flynn. Apparently they really fancied each other but she was too shy to anything about it... so she said! And of course she was brilliant in The Heiress, no exaggeration, she had the talent to support her star status. Too many great performances to mention, but her role in The Snake Pit was a breakthrough for reforming mental health services. RIP to them both.
 

escargot

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the perfect match for Robin Hood as played by Errol Flynn. Apparently they really fancied each other but she was too shy to anything about it... so she said!
It wouldn't be up to her if Flynn dared to go for it. He was famously priapic.
de Havilland was an important star, which meant Flynn would have a lot to lose by treating her the way he usually dealt with women.

David Niven presents some watered-down Flynn incidents in his memoirs. A nasty one was when Niven hired two prostitutes, an older and a younger woman, whom he introduced to Flynn and mother and daughter.

The 'mother' was conveniently called away so that the 'daughter' was conveniently left alone with Flynn, who, even though he believed her to be underage, proceeded to force himself on her. Eventually 'Mother' returned and hilarity ensued.
 

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He'd hold back at times and appear a split-second after your brain raised an eye-brow as if to ask, "Surely he's going to come in here?" It made his lead parts extremely satisfying because you asked for and then received.
Such a beautiful, eloquent eulogy... wish I had wrtten same.

Never mind...


:reyes:

 

GNC

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It wouldn't be up to her if Flynn dared to go for it. He was famously priapic.
de Havilland was an important star, which meant Flynn would have a lot to lose by treating her the way he usually dealt with women.
I think there was a lot of mutual respect between Olivia and Errol, and the romantic feelings he had for her was a big part of that. They starred in eight films together, and she was not the sort to fall down for anyone - she originated the De Havilland Law which prevents performers from doing things they don't agree to because of their contracts. She may have looked and acted demure, but she was pretty tough.
 

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Tim Smith - I can't say I was a fan as I was just listening to so much other music so missed out. His band did influence others, (young knives spring to mind).
I'm not trying to convert anyone to the Cardiacs, music is a very personal choice, but I need to pay my respects to Tim Smith.
The music that shaped my early life: (eg Lindisfarne, Mott the Hoople, Gong, various Reggae and Punk bands) was something shared with my mates - playing it too loud in the bedroom or going to the odd gigs. But by the time I'd finished my teens, everyone I knew had begun to drift away and I never seemed to have made new friends. The music that got me through the factories and Poly was mainly Magazine (with a little Eno and Lou Reed) and I didn't have interest in anything new.
Then in my early 30's I was working at the Reading Festival and heard something that got me running to the Mean Fiddler Tent. There was a tall slim chap on stage in a lime green cocktail dress and work-boots holding a guitar whilst Tim Smith was shouting at him. Behold the Cardiacs.
I worked my way through the backlog of albums, beginning with the double CD Sing to God (1996) which to me remains the classical essence. I sneaked off work on the morning of the release of Guns. Virgin Megastore on Oxford treet was empty but all copies had already gone by 10:30 - but.. but how ? I was the only person I knew who'd even heard of the Cardiacs. I bidded hard for the Maresnest video on ebay, sought the albums Tim had done under the radar with other groups (Pony with the Spratley Japs), went to gigs on my own but always bought two tickets.
In 2005 the Cardiacs re-recorded some of their earlier works, no material newer than 1983 was allowed, but this time with proper recording equipment and 25 years of practice and experience (some of the band members were only 15-16 in Cardiac Arrest in 1977). I recommend Jibber & Twitch on youtube, recorded in a leaky shed in the rain with yapping dogs and Jim Smith (Tim's big brother) on drums in his underpants. Cardiacs just got better and better and then Tim had a massive and supremely ironic heart-attack in 2008. Money was needed for special physiotherapy (£100,000 a year) and an album (Leader of the Starry Sky) was compiled of Cardiac songs performed by artists who had at either at one time been in the Cardiacs or bands that had been influenced by them. Tim rallied a little, things looked rosy, then he died.
I'm 60 - now what's going to get me out of my chair ?
 

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The director of many classic comedy TV shows has passed away.

Porridge director Sydney Lotterby leaves 'true legacy of laughter'
  • 30 July 2020


Tributes have been paid to the Bafta-winning TV comedy director and producer Sydney Lotterby, who has died aged 93.
Lotterby made British comedy classics including Porridge, Last Of The Summer Wine and Yes Minister.
The director was also known for As Time Goes By, Butterflies, May To December and Open All Hours.
BBC director general Lord Tony Hall said he will be "hugely missed", but leaves "a true legacy of laughter".
"Sydney Lotterby wasn't just part of the golden age of British comedy - he made many of the shows that stand out as real icons of the period," said Lord Hall.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-53594082
 

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Was there any successful director with the range of Alan Parker? OK, some will say musicals were his favourite genre, but there was so much more to his filmography than those. And he was totally unpretentious about his craft, too. Also, he was right about Peter Greenaway. RIP.
 

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Was there any successful director with the range of Alan Parker? OK, some will say musicals were his favourite genre, but there was so much more to his filmography than those. And he was totally unpretentious about his craft, too. Also, he was right about Peter Greenaway. RIP.
May I ask what he said about Greenaway?
 
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