Ridiculous Typos & Piss-Poor Proof-Reading

OneWingedBird

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For at least the third time since March I've had an email at work that said 'bare with me'.

Part of my job is chasing up overcharges from hotels, quite often they try (though rarely succeed) in fobbing me off with the worsr grammar possible.

About once a month I get an email reply that is literally unintelligable, to a point where even in context I can't work out what they're trying to say.
 

EnolaGaia

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‘County’ misspelled on 10,000 trash bins in Alabama town

Some spelling mistakes are tough to see, but that doesn’t include the one that was made on 10,000 trash bins in an Alabama city.

The city of Prichard’s new residential garbage cans say the town is located in “Mobile Country,” but they were supposed to say it’s located in “Mobile County” without the extra “r.” The mistake isn’t just in fine print: It’s printed in large letters on two sides of the big, gray cans.

Prichard Mayor Jimmie Gardner told WPMI-TV the city’s public works department had the duty of making sure the writing on the cans was spelled correctly.

“Things like that do happen in the proofing,” he said.

The city doesn’t plan to replace the bins, and that’s fine with some people.

“It doesn’t really matter as long as they pick it up,” said longtime resident Murlean Henderson.
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/5159b54d945489192846f3bdcffd925b
 

Comfortably Numb

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Just reminded there of an occurrence - must surely have been 1973.

It was a midweek, evening football match at Hampden - IIRC, Scotland v Northern Ireland, in the old Home Internationals tournament.

There were those old-style billboards - just a two-piece angled '^' - around the pitch.

They were all advertising, 'The Exorcist'.

Except that... every one was instead promoting a film entitled, 'The Excorist'.

Often wondered, if I was the only person in the ground to notice this!
 

Mythopoeika

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Just reminded there of an occurrence - must surely have been 1973.

It was a midweek, evening football match at Hampden - IIRC, Scotland v Northern Ireland, in the old Home Internationals tournament.

There were those old-style billboards - just a two-piece angled '^' - around the pitch.

They were all advertising, 'The Exorcist'.

Except that... every one was instead promoting a film entitled, 'The Excorist'.

Often wondered, if I was the only person in the ground to notice this!
They should be excoriated for such an error!
 

blessmycottonsocks

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CarlosTheDJ

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The Oxford comma is a useful thing, especially when writing accessible text for websites. If you use a screen reader, the additional pause can be essential.

Language and punctuation is about the ease of understanding a communication, and in the case of the coin the comma is not adding or detracting anything. It really doesn't matter whether it's there or not, the pause doesn't change the sentiment.
 

Squail

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Was reminded last night of what must have been one of history's most renowned, and potentially most embarrassing, printer's errors. In a discussion group at my church, the lady leading the group mentioned as a humorous aside, an edition of the Bible which gave the Seventh Commandment as "Thou shalt commit adultery". She seemed to imply that this had been done deliberately, by someone in the 1980s -- indicative of permissive attitudes current at the time. I would think that the story as got by her had changed, somewhere along the line, from what I had heard of as the origin of this "version" of the commandment: the book which bibliophiles call the "Wicked Bible", printed in England in 1631. Most unfortunately, the printers omitted the "not" in the sentence, and failed to catch the error...

I seem totally not to have the knack of posting links; but Googling "Wicked Bible" should bring up as the first "hit", the Wiki article, with the full story.
 

GNC

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That's the verse number, not the Commandment number.
 
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