Ridiculous Typos & Piss-Poor Proof-Reading

Souleater

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
3,414
Reaction score
5,850
Points
203
Heathcliff?

Orange!
unnamed (1).png
 

Souleater

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
3,414
Reaction score
5,850
Points
203
It's only a brief mention.

When I did the book for an English degree in the '80s there was no mention of Heathcliff's ethnicity even though characters speculate on it. The whole point is that he is an outsider and looks it.
'Nelly' describes him as 'a different kind of black', he's referred to as 'it' (suggesting something other than human, which is how slaves were seen at the time) and he is constantly referred to as being 'different' suggesting somebody completely unlike the norm. But all of these things are open to interpretation.
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
32,818
Reaction score
40,689
Points
309
Location
HM The Tower of London
'Nelly' describes him as 'a different kind of black', he's referred to as 'it' (suggesting something other than human, which is how slaves were seen at the time) and he is constantly referred to as being 'different' suggesting somebody completely unlike the norm. But all of these things are open to interpretation.

Yup, I know all that.

My point was that during my university course where various themes and recurring motifs in the book were analysed (windows as eyes, the symbolism of the weather, continuing relationships between succeeding generations of the families etc) Heathcliff's apparently foreign appearance did not seem important, even though the characters gossiped about it.

I personally thought Heathcliff must be of very dark complexion indeed for his apparent Gypsy origins to be so often brought up by the characters. Perhaps he was really a Spanish orphan? Liverpool was a seaport so he could have come from abroad.

Students who raised the issue were told Heathcliff was a Gypsy child who had been found wandering in Liverpool as per Mr Earnshaw's account. Attempts to bring up characters' speculations and start a discussion were closed down.
 

Peripart

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
6,306
Reaction score
4,779
Points
259
I personally thought Heathcliff must be of very dark complexion indeed for his apparent Gypsy origins to be so often brought up by the characters. Perhaps he was really a Spanish orphan? Liverpool was a seaport so he could have come from abroad.

Sounds like a reasonable enough idea. On a slight tangent, I recall there being some excitement that Pepys mentioned a "black" woman in his diaries. However, it was decided, as I recall, that this description was used to describe hair colour, not skin.

I'm not saying that 1660s London bore much resemblance to the time of Wuthering Heights, but we have to be aware that we can't simply use our current meanings of words when understanding literature of another century.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
32,876
Reaction score
40,941
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
Sounds like a reasonable enough idea. On a slight tangent, I recall there being some excitement that Pepys mentioned a "black" woman in his diaries. However, it was decided, as I recall, that this description was used to describe hair colour, not skin.

I'm not saying that 1660s London bore much resemblance to the time of Wuthering Heights, but we have to be aware that we can't simply use our current meanings of words when understanding literature of another century.

Complexion was all relative.

I've read a number of descriptions of men from the Second World War and descriptors such as 'dark featured' and 'dark complexion' never mean black-skinned (unless the intent is humour), for if the subject were black or brown-skinned he would be described as such or referred to directly by his inferred race: Indian, West Indian, African etc.

Both reader and writer would have instinctively known by context whether a European was being referred to (and if it was not clear instinctively, it would be remarked upon in the text), so 'dark' would be relative to the standard pale or light skin of an Englishman. That standard would seldom be mentioned, although 'fresh' often arises as a euphemism for those who appear young and relatively unblemished.

From all I've read, 'dark' usually means swarthy (in the sense of weather-worn and darkened) or naturally olive-skinned in the fashion of the Southern European races. Again, the Egyptians, with whom the British had signficant interactions, would usually be referred to as Egyptians, Muslims or (offensively) 'wogs', not 'dark'.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
8,292
Reaction score
17,819
Points
309
Sounds like a reasonable enough idea. On a slight tangent, I recall there being some excitement that Pepys mentioned a "black" woman in his diaries. However, it was decided, as I recall, that this description was used to describe hair colour, not skin.

I'm not saying that 1660s London bore much resemblance to the time of Wuthering Heights, but we have to be aware that we can't simply use our current meanings of words when understanding literature of another century.

“Sunday 25 October 1668

(Lord’s day). Up, and discoursing with my wife about our house and many new things we are doing of, and so to church I, and there find Jack Fenn come, and his wife, a pretty black woman: I never saw her before, nor took notice of her now.”

https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/10/25/

The link in the original text opens this note:

“Pepys generally uses “black” to mean having dark hair colour or complexion.”

maximus otter
 

Souleater

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
3,414
Reaction score
5,850
Points
203
Complexion was all relative.

I've read a number of descriptions of men from the Second World War and descriptors such as 'dark featured' and 'dark complexion' never mean black-skinned (unless the intent is humour), for if the subject were black or brown-skinned he would be described as such or referred to directly by his inferred race: Indian, West Indian, African etc.

Both reader and writer would have instinctively known by context whether a European was being referred to (and if it was not clear instinctively, it would be remarked upon in the text), so 'dark' would be relative to the standard pale or light skin of an Englishman. That standard would seldom be mentioned, although 'fresh' often arises as a euphemism for those who appear young and relatively unblemished.

From all I've read, 'dark' usually means swarthy (in the sense of weather-worn and darkened) or naturally olive-skinned in the fashion of the Southern European races. Again, the Egyptians, with whom the British had signficant interactions, would usually be referred to as Egyptians, Muslims or (offensively) 'wogs', not 'dark'.
In 'Wuthering Heights' Nelly says that Heathcliff is not “a regular black”, no mention of dark or swarthy, it doesnt read as a description of hair colour or complexion buy his race.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
8,292
Reaction score
17,819
Points
309
"Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living. He is a dark-skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure..."

Wuthering Heights, Ch.1

"Oh, Heathcliff, you are showing a poor spirit! Come to the glass, and I’ll let you see what you should wish. Do you mark those two lines between your eyes; and those thick brows, that, instead of rising arched, sink in the middle; and that couple of black fiends, so deeply buried, who never open their windows boldly, but lurk glinting under them, like devil’s spies? Wish and learn to smooth away the surly wrinkles, to raise your lids frankly, and change the fiends to confident, innocent angels, suspecting and doubting nothing, and always seeing friends where they are not sure of foes. Don’t get the expression of a vicious cur that appears to know the kicks it gets are its dessert, and yet hates all the world, as well as the kicker, for what it suffers.”

“In other words, I [Heathcliff: m.o.] must wish for Edgar Linton’s great blue eyes and even forehead,” he replied. “I do—and that won’t help me to them.”

A good heart will help you to a bonny face, my lad,” I continued, “if you were a regular black; and a bad one will turn the bonniest into something worse than ugly. And now that we’ve done washing, and combing, and sulking—tell me whether you don’t think yourself rather handsome? I’ll tell you, I do. You’re fit for a prince in disguise. Who knows but your father was Emperor of China, and your mother an Indian queen, each of them able to buy up, with one week’s income, Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange together? And you were kidnapped by wicked sailors and brought to England. Were I in your place, I would frame high notions of my birth; and the thoughts of what I was should give me courage and dignity to support the oppressions of a little farmer!”

Wuthering Heights, Ch.7

maximus otter
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
32,876
Reaction score
40,941
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
This one is repeated across the BBC today.

typo.jpg


Read literally, this is a very strange business model.

You accepted our new terms? I'm afraid we will now cancel your account.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
22,176
Reaction score
32,049
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
No-Enry-Maldon.jpg

Newly painted road in Britain misspells 'ENTRY' as 'ENRY'

Officials in a British town took to social media to make light of a newly-painted road that features a small spelling error in very large letters: "NO ENRY."

The road outside of a parking garage in the city center of Maldon, England, was supposed to be painted to read "NO ENTRY," but residents quickly realized the message was missing the letter "T."

ADVERTISEMENT
"If you're having a bad day... just know that someone else is having a worse day than you," the Maldon District Council said in a Facebook post.

The council said the error will soon be corrected.

FULL STORY: https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2021/02/26/britain-painted-road-no-enry-typo/8491614367959/
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
Joined
May 29, 2009
Messages
3,848
Reaction score
9,833
Points
219
Location
Welwyn Garden City (but oddly, not an actual city)
I saw that too this week but didn't get around to posting it.
What made me chuckle though is that you can see that the letters have been spaced in such a way that there are bigger gaps either side of the 'R', almost as though they realised as they were doing it that something didn't quite fit right, LOL.

I think they should leave it like it.
 

Stormkhan

Disturbingly familiar
Joined
May 28, 2003
Messages
4,676
Reaction score
1,911
Points
184
Maldon's a nice little market town.
They deserve better. :)
 

Bad Bungle

Dingo took my tray bake.
Joined
Oct 13, 2018
Messages
2,659
Reaction score
7,298
Points
204
Location
The Chilterns

Squail

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
51
Reaction score
122
Points
34
I recall a cousin and myself, aged about thirteen, having fun trying to put the song concerned, into French -- a bit, went something like:

Je vais me marier a la veuve prochaine;
Elle a eu sept maris, tous nommays just the same --
Car chacun d'eux fut un Heneri (Heneri !)
Elle n'aurait pas un Guillaume ni un Guy;
Je suis son huitieme vieux homme nommay Heneri --
Heneri le Huit je suis.
 

ChasFink

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
701
Reaction score
1,606
Points
139

Mikefule

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Dec 9, 2009
Messages
753
Reaction score
2,573
Points
149
Location
Lincolnshire UK
For some reason put me in mind of the famous misunderstanding/misprint over England cricket spin bowler, Ashley Giles.

He was known as the "King of Spin" but as that expression made no sense to the proof reader, a whole consignment of promotional mugs was produced with the motto, "The King of Spain".

(A search for images of examples was contaminated by the fact that it became a bit of a meme, and other products were deliberately produced with variations like "The King of Pain".)
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
Joined
May 29, 2009
Messages
3,848
Reaction score
9,833
Points
219
Location
Welwyn Garden City (but oddly, not an actual city)
I'm surprised they didn't complain that they didn't have the right letters to paint "fermare".
 
Top