Robot Round-Up

INT21

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..I didn’t know how I would afford a robot like Emma, ..

It might work out a lot cheaper than a wife.
 

EnolaGaia

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Comfortably Numb

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Robot uses artificial intelligence and imaging to draw blood

Source: techxplore.com
Date: 4 March, 2020

Rutgers engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs.

Their most recent research results, published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, suggest that autonomous systems like the image-guided robotic device could outperform people on some complex medical tasks.

Medical robots could reduce injuries and improve the efficiency and outcomes of procedures, as well as carry out tasks with minimal supervision when resources are limited. This would allow health care professionals to focus more on other critical aspects of medical care and enable emergency medical providers to bring advanced interventions and resuscitation efforts to remote and resource-limited areas.

"Using volunteers, models and animals, our team showed that the device can accurately pinpoint blood vessels, improving success rates and procedure times compared with expert health care professionals, especially with difficult to access blood vessels," said senior author Martin L. Yarmush, Paul & Mary Monroe Chair & Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in the School of Engineering at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Getting access to veins, arteries and other blood vessels is a critical first step in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. They include drawing blood, administering fluids and medications, introducing devices such as stents and monitoring health. The timeliness of procedures can be critical, but gaining access to blood vessels in many people can be quite challenging.

https://m.techxplore.com/news/2020-03-robot-artificial-intelligence-imaging-blood.html
 

Lord Lucan

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I'm not 100% certain that this machine qualifies as a robot, but it's great to watch.

The description: The Octo Bouncer - Arduino project with 120 FPS OpenCV image processing and smooth stepper motor moves. The machine calculates the ball's 3D position from the image processing data and uses this information to control the orange ping pong ball.


I could watch this over & over.
 

Swifty

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I'm not 100% certain that this machine qualifies as a robot, but it's great to watch.

The description: The Octo Bouncer - Arduino project with 120 FPS OpenCV image processing and smooth stepper motor moves. The machine calculates the ball's 3D position from the image processing data and uses this information to control the orange ping pong ball.


I could watch this over & over.
Cool. If they build a couple of vertical machines, we could watch robot ping pong or a single machine against a human.
 

maximus otter

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US Navy robot submarine would be able to kill without human control

The US Navy is quietly developing armed robot submarines controlled by onboard artificial intelligence. The vessels could potentially kill without explicit human control.

The Office of Naval Research is carrying out the project, known as CLAWS, which it describes in budget documents as an autonomous undersea weapon system for clandestine use. CLAWS will “increase mission areas into kinetic effects”, say the documents – military-speak for destroying things.

In particular, CLAWS will equip robot submarines with sensors and algorithms to carry out complex missions on their own.

Paywalled report: https://www.newscientist.com/articl...-to-kill-without-human-control/#ixzz6GH2MuttX

More in the Daily Mail.

maximus otter
 

XBergMann

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I'm not 100% certain that this machine qualifies as a robot, but it's great to watch.

The description: The Octo Bouncer - Arduino project with 120 FPS OpenCV image processing and smooth stepper motor moves. The machine calculates the ball's 3D position from the image processing data and uses this information to control the orange ping pong ball.


I could watch this over & over.
This explains why Commander Data was so good at table tennis
 

Mythopoeika

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US Navy robot submarine would be able to kill without human control

The US Navy is quietly developing armed robot submarines controlled by onboard artificial intelligence. The vessels could potentially kill without explicit human control.

The Office of Naval Research is carrying out the project, known as CLAWS, which it describes in budget documents as an autonomous undersea weapon system for clandestine use. CLAWS will “increase mission areas into kinetic effects”, say the documents – military-speak for destroying things.

In particular, CLAWS will equip robot submarines with sensors and algorithms to carry out complex missions on their own.

Paywalled report: https://www.newscientist.com/articl...-to-kill-without-human-control/#ixzz6GH2MuttX

More in the Daily Mail.

maximus otter
Let's all hope that Skynet doesn't get control over these.
 

MorningAngel

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Engineers Devise Slow-Moving Liquid Metal Structures Perfect For Creepy Terminators

Source: sciencealert.com
Date: 8 May, 2020

As far as we know, liquid metal robots from the future have yet to show up. But new research into alloys and lattice materials shows how liquid metal shapes can be deformed and reformed using heat.

Researchers have developed a method of wrapping Field's alloy - a mixture of bismuth, indium and tin - in a lattice or shell made out of rubber-like elastomers, which gives the liquid metal some useful extra properties.

In particular, the liquid metal and elastomer lattice combination can be deformed after heating, and then recover its original shape after being heated up again a second time: not quite a robot rising up out of a lava pit, but the same sort of idea.

https://www.sciencealert.com/this-s...re-could-be-how-the-terminator-gets-its-start
 
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