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Cochise

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Didn't I read somewhere just a day or two ago that Andrew and Fergie are talking of getting back together?
Or was it another one of my cheese dreams?
I think they've never been more than semi-detached. It might have been better all round if they'd just stuck together.
 

Lb8535

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A defendant can evade answering to charges if he / she can reasonably claim to have never been notified that charges have been made against him / her. Serving papers ratchets court proceedings forward by demonstrably placing responsibility on the defendant to appear / answer / whatever. If papers cannot be served, it falls to the prosecuting authorities to ask the court's permission to notify the defendant by some other means (e.g., a public notice). Otherwise, the service process has to continue until such time as the defendant is formally served and becomes obligated to appear or otherwise answer to the court.

No intermediate party or proxy can be a legally valid recipient of served papers unless they hold formal legal authority over the defendant's affairs or the court rules their receipt constitutes actionable receipt by the defendant based on extraordinary circumstances.
It's standard in the US for registered businesses to be required to name an agent for service. Most legit businesses name their attorney. I would think that in the case of a person so public that an officer of the court is stationed at his locked gate serving that officer would be just fine. "We weren't served properly" is the grade-D defense of someone who has no other defense, and in this case at least in the US is very easily overcome by asking the judge for permission right then to re-serve the attorney who appeared in court stating that his client had not been served. It's a nonsense delaying tactic and in this case I can't imagine what it would gain, unless someone not too bright is trying to help lower a settlement by showing that the client knows all the tricks to delay the process. I say this once having worked in a business where we regularly turned off the lights and locked the doors because someone was after the owner.
 

Austin Popper

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I say this once having worked in a business where we regularly turned off the lights and locked the doors because someone was after the owner.
Heh! I worked for a guy who thought he was a smooth operator. His business was desperately undercapitalized so he ran it from "paycheck to paycheck". I heard him on the phone one time trying to bullshit someone at the gas company, I think it was, with some flapdoodle about the check being in the mail. After he hung up the phone, he congratulated himself on his brilliance as a liar. He actually seemed to think he had put something over on the gas company, as though they had not heard it all several times a day.
 

Cochise

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It's standard in the US for registered businesses to be required to name an agent for service. Most legit businesses name their attorney. I would think that in the case of a person so public that an officer of the court is stationed at his locked gate serving that officer would be just fine. "We weren't served properly" is the grade-D defense of someone who has no other defense, and in this case at least in the US is very easily overcome by asking the judge for permission right then to re-serve the attorney who appeared in court stating that his client had not been served. It's a nonsense delaying tactic and in this case I can't imagine what it would gain, unless someone not too bright is trying to help lower a settlement by showing that the client knows all the tricks to delay the process. I say this once having worked in a business where we regularly turned off the lights and locked the doors because someone was after the owner.
Not the rules in the UK. AFAIK you have to serve the actual person. Hence the old profession of tipstaff. And I can assure you that in the UK (I'm glad to say) we are not subject to US law. And after Afghanistan you can hardly threaten us.

I suspect we'd even be happy for you to take back your nukes, given the current tensions between England and Scotland. Most of the jobs lost would be Scots and they'd blame the US instead of England.

I have enormous respect for the US and I love the place, but there never was any 'special relationship'.

Your darn lucky I'm not in charge - I reckon I could leave Trump, Biden and Johnson blowing in the weeds. Vote for Me!

:loopy:
 

escargot

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No intermediate party or proxy can be a legally valid recipient of served papers unless they hold formal legal authority over the defendant's affairs or the court rules their receipt constitutes actionable receipt by the defendant based on extraordinary circumstances.
That covers HRH for sure. I mean, the papers were delivered to his current address which was being guarded by an officer of the Metropolitan Police and an assurance was given by said officer that they would be given to the addressee.

That'd do it if I was being served! No court in the land would argue!
 

escargot

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Heh! I worked for a guy who thought he was a smooth operator. His business was desperately undercapitalized so he ran it from "paycheck to paycheck". I heard him on the phone one time trying to bullshit someone at the gas company, I think it was, with some flapdoodle about the check being in the mail. After he hung up the phone, he congratulated himself on his brilliance as a liar. He actually seemed to think he had put something over on the gas company, as though they had not heard it all several times a day.
'The check is in the mail' - someone once told me that was one of the three most common lies, along with 'I won't cum in your mouth!'

Can't remember the third even though I've probably heard it a hundred times. :chuckle:
 

Mythopoeika

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It's hardly a novel situation for the Royals to have to cover up sexual misconduct. It'll be interesting to see if they can still manage it in the modern world.
I seem to recall that some years ago, there was an incident in the Royal household. A member of staff had been interfered with.
At the time, I recall thinking that a certain prince was indeed the most likely culprit.
However, it was all hushed up and swept under the carpet (no doubt for an undisclosed sum).
 

escargot

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I seem to recall that some years ago, there was an incident in the Royal household. A member of staff had been interfered with.
At the time, I recall thinking that a certain prince was indeed the most likely culprit.
However, it was all hushed up and swept under the carpet (no doubt for an undisclosed sum).
As I recall that particular unpleasantness concerned a senior male courtier. His alleged victim was a younger subordinate. No actual royals were involved.
 

escargot

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Found this, from t'Grauniad in 2002 -

Member of palace staff in new rape allegation

Another allegation of male rape within the royal household was investigated last year when a junior member of staff at Buckingham Palace complained he had been attacked by a fellow worker, it emerged yesterday.

The matter was investigated by Scotland Yard at the same time as officers were probing allegations of a male rape at St James's Palace. The incidents were "of a similar nature" but were not linked, sources said.

The disclosure is bound to heighten concern over claims that there is a culture of bullying within the royal household. It will also add to the discomfort at St James's Palace over the way it handled the affair.

A 'culture of bullying'? That's not what I'd call it.
 

Yithian

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Completely natural:

SmartSelect_20210916-211340_Samsung Internet.jpg
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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One of those photos is a mirror image, I know that much.
 

escargot

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It looks like he's hiding behind her.
Reminds me of the famous Vogue cover featuring the muscular black basketball player LeBron James with his arm round the waist of smiling model Gisele Bundchen.

While James was the first black man to be seen on Vogue's cover, the pose was seen as disparaging by many who compared it to a shot of King Kong abducting Fay Wray.

A picture paints a thousand words. :wink2:
 
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