School bans girl with hair braids

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Anonymous

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#1
"A 13-year-old girl has been suspended from school because the head teacher disapproves of her hairstyle....
The school has offered to teach her apart from other pupils. The local authority says it cannot intervene.

Olivia regards the school's policy as discriminatory because black pupils are allowed to wear braids....rules drawn up by governors which state that children "cannot have their head shaved or wear extreme hair fashions of any sort". ...The school has offered to teach her apart from other pupils"

err.... so she has to be taught away from other pupils cos her hair is likely to do what?..... how stupid are the govenors?... what posible reason can there be for this other than a petty need for control. they are too scared to ban braids for the black girls but this girl is an easy target, but to me its just as daft as racisum.
 

Melf

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#2
sidecar_jon said:
"
...rules drawn up by governors which state that children "cannot have their head shaved or wear extreme hair fashions of any sort".
would waist long hair on a boy be classed as extreme?
 
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Anonymous

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#3
Speaking of scholastic stupidity....

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. Mar 18, 2005 — A 5-year-old girl was arrested, cuffed and put in back of a police cruiser after an outburst at school where she threw books and boxes, kicked a teacher in the shins, smashed a candy dish, hit an assistant principal in the stomach and drew on the walls.

The students were counting jelly beans as part of a math exercise at Fairmount Park Elementary School when the little girl began acting silly. That's when her teacher took away her jelly beans, outraging the child.

Minutes later, the 40-pound girl was in the back of a police cruiser, under arrest for battery. Her hands were bound with plastic ties, her ankles in handcuffs.

"I don't want to go to jail," she said moments after her arrest Monday.

No charges were filed and the girl went home with her mother.

While police say their actions were proper, school officials were not pleased with the outcome.

"We never want to have 5-year-old children arrested," said Michael Bessette, the district's Area III superintendent.

The district's campus police should have been called to help and not local police, he said.

Bessette said campus police routinely deal with children and are trained to calm them in such situations.

Under the district's code of student conduct, students are to be suspended for 10 days and recommended for expulsion for unprovoked attacks, even if they don't result in serious injury. But district spokesman Ron Stone said that rule wouldn't apply to kindergartners.

"She's been appropriately disciplined under the circumstances," he said.

The girl's mother, Inda Akins, said she is consulting an attorney.

"She's never going back to that school," Akins said. "They set my baby up."
:roll:

Link: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/WaterCooler/w ... ?id=593677
 

Leaferne

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#4
Blimey. :shock:

Any hint of why she went off the rails? (she ate some jelly beans and went ape from the sugar?) Acting silly is par for the course at that age, but throwing things and kicking adults in the shins is a bit much.
 
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melf said:
sidecar_jon said:
"
...rules drawn up by governors which state that children "cannot have their head shaved or wear extreme hair fashions of any sort".
would waist long hair on a boy be classed as extreme?

strange one thinks thing progess and they dont.. id be banned now for long hair and my school haircut was at times punky.. so id be banned then too... i wish schools would grow up a bit.
 

rjmrjmrjm

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#6
I'm not sure really. Extreme hairstyles are banned, not because of schools wanting to enforce any particular restraint on a pupils individuality, but usually because it cuts down on trouble between pupils.

In my school, we had a collar rule for boys. I.e. your hair couldn't be longer than your collar. Even so, no-body wore it that long because if you did the bullies and idiots in the year would make your life hell. Even now, in 6th Form where you are allowed 'extreme styles' my long haired friends are often taunted with: 'Wog Head', 'Wig Head', 'Gerra hair cut' etc... very derogatory remarks.
 
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Anonymous

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ah wel its just a pity the black kids cant be legislated to be white and the diabled made to walk properly ah.. :roll: ....... hairs not a consideration in education . its the schools job to teach and not make the kids into little robots.... just my opinion on their facist tendancies....


oops being a bit harsh there.. i understant why they would want to make rules like this but i think they are stupid doing it... its just disguiseing the bullying problem they have by removeing one bully trigger, they always find another.
 

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#8
A lot of parents still have issues from their own schooldays and they use their offspring to fight them all over again.

Parents who have problems with a school's uniform policy can usually find a less exacting school in the neighbourhood. The "fascists" are usually over-subscribed.

The cultural cringe aspects of the present case are a red herring, I think. All I see here are parents with no regard for the best interests of their child. :(
 
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#9
Leaferne said:
Blimey. :shock:

Any hint of why she went off the rails? (she ate some jelly beans and went ape from the sugar?) Acting silly is par for the course at that age, but throwing things and kicking adults in the shins is a bit much.
The little girl's behavior was atrocious, but calling the police was waaaay out of line. This is more of the zero tolerance crap that gets kids expelled from school for carrying fingernail clippers and idiotic stuff like that.
 

Cavynaut

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#11
If I was still at school I'd make a point of wearing a Muslim bhurka(sp?).

That'd confuse the buggers. :roll:
 

OneWingedBird

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#12
I don't know what the problem is here. In all fairness, it looks smart and tidy enough and I doubt she'd have a problem, say working in an office with the same style. I could understand them getting uppity if she'd come in looking like Keith Flint or something, but not this, esp. when black pupils are allowed the same.
 
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Anonymous

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James..fine if you want your kids to be little robots, personaly i dont think its agood idea either for society or personaly. What this is teaching the kids is that thier lives are going to endlessly interfeared with for trivial reasons. it isnt real life and, if it is then it deserves to be goaded and proded out of its stupidity...
 
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The Yithian said:
She does look like a bit of comfortably middle-class mini-chav-wannabe...
personaly choice ... im sure she'll grow up to be an acuntant or some other "valiable" memeber of society.
 

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#16
sidecar_jon said:
The Yithian said:
She does look like a bit of comfortably middle-class mini-chav-wannabe...
personaly choice ... im sure she'll grow up to be an acuntant or some other "valiable" memeber of society.
Or a 15yr old single mother ;)
 

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#17
sidecar_jon said:
James..fine if you want your kids to be little robots, personaly i dont think its agood idea either for society or personaly. What this is teaching the kids is that thier lives are going to endlessly interfeared with for trivial reasons. it isnt real life and, if it is then it deserves to be goaded and proded out of its stupidity...
School Play

"But, soft, what light through yonder window breaks?"

"Exterminate! Exterminate!"

Headmaster: "I see your little robots are coming on well again this year, Whitehead. That's four exterminations this term. Still, mustn't grumble, I suppose. It keeps the Chavs out and I see the waiting list is up again!"

:p
 

Twin_Star

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#18
sidecar_jon said:
"A 13-year-old girl has been suspended from school because the head teacher disapproves of her hairstyle....
The school has offered to teach her apart from other pupils. The local authority says it cannot intervene.

Olivia regards the school's policy as discriminatory because black pupils are allowed to wear braids....rules drawn up by governors which state that children "cannot have their head shaved or wear extreme hair fashions of any sort". ...The school has offered to teach her apart from other pupils"

err.... so she has to be taught away from other pupils cos her hair is likely to do what?..... how stupid are the govenors?... what posible reason can there be for this other than a petty need for control. they are too scared to ban braids for the black girls but this girl is an easy target, but to me its just as daft as racism.
I'm not so sure. I have followed this article from the day it was first printed in the Manchester Evening News, and I thought from the outset: "what a storm in a tea-cup". With that in mind, however:

I think there's a few points that need to be made

1) The school she attends was failing, with absenteeism, lack of discipline in classes and break times, low exam results et al.
2) A new "super-head" was brought in and tightened up attendance and discipline, with the net result being better exam results, and improvement to many other areas (including a reduction in reporting bullying and acts of violence). Amongst all this, one of the initiatives was to heighten the requirements for school uniform and appearance.
3) With the new "strict" dress code in place, great emphasis was placed on complying with this rule. After all, exceptions (unfortunately but hey that's life) tend to create friction amongst pupils, cries of favouritism and foul and the associated ill-feeling.
4) This girl had her hair braided on a family outing and when she came back to school, she was told her hair was unacceptable. Her family then informed the school that it would take two weeks to get her an appointment to “unpick” the braids.
5) The school then suggested she could be taught in the teaching support unit (separate from other pupils) until this time. The girl and her parents refused this offer. They also started with the racial discrimination thing.
6) The only area where maybe I don’t see the schools POV is their rationale for the black / non-black braid issue. They claim that braids worn by black children are acceptable as they are part of the racial heritage of those pupils. Well, I guess that sounds reasonable enough at first glance, but does pose some questions if looked into a little deeper.
7) The girl and her parents have now decided that this girls hair-style is more important than her education, and have refused to unpick the braids, opting to teach her from home. Judging by the TV interview I saw on Granada reports, I would say her mum and dad probably do not know the national curriculum to a high enough level to assure this girl any chance of success.

So what do I make of all this? Is it stupid, pointless bureaucracy gone mad? Well, no I don’t think so. I don’t consider a school asking its pupils to conform whilst in their care as sowing the seeds for mindless automata. After all, the vast majority of school leavers going into the workplace are asked to wear appropriate dress (if working in an office for example). Secondly, the parents of this girl should have unpicked the braids themselves, sent her back to school the very next day and gone in to have a quiet word with the head teacher. But no, they are now sitting on a point of principle allowing their daughter’s education to suffer. Stupid, pig-headed idiots.

What of the school, and the governors similar pig-headedness? Well, the way I see it they have 1000 pupils to inspire, to teach and to act “in loco parentis” for. They obviously therefore cannot be seen to bend the rules. That way, my friends, anarchy lies.

100% blame the parents on this one, folks.
 
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Anonymous

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#19
if "education" is so terribly important.... why are they going to take it away from her cos of her hair?.... the answer of course is Schools are more about control than "education".... just thro this hoop and you can get a "good" job..... jump thro this one and you can be a "good" person... cut you hair and you can be in our club.. wear these clothes and you can join in.... think this way and you can be "one of us"... well just maybe some don't want that, maybe some have a spark . maybe some just don't fit....... OK so its a "failing school". So that means its management and teachers are failing in their jobs, the pupils are not to blame for that are they?... or are they just poor scum to be discarded and kept under control?
 

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#20
Calm yourself down, Jon.

We've all encountered teachers who make Hitler look a bit wet and we can all get annoyed at their memory - I certainly do.

One of the first sights which greeted me on teaching practice, many years ago, was my teacher-mentor ranting almost incoherently at some gangling dork. He had dared to come into school with white socks on and boy was she annoyed! I wondered then if I'd ever turn into someone with such problems as hers.

For as many years as I could get away with it, I adopted a blind-eye approach to school rules which struck me as petty. I took the view that it was my task to teach English and ignore what they had on their faces, on their feet or in their lug-holes.

OK, so we ignore the hair, but what if they start grooming each other? We ignore the trainers but what about the baseball cap? If we ignore that we still have the mobile phone to contend with. Lots of perfect little individuals, expressing themselves by their mindless persuit of street culture.

Failing schools are a bit of con-trick, to be honest. The poor old failing Heads are kicked out and a new team is brought in. Guess what? The new team have powers that the old Heads could only dream of! First - they will immediately have the power to exclude the hard-core trouble-makers. Sixty to a hundred kids will not be invited back. This will give the school a breathing space.

With the worst bullies excluded - don't ask where they go, that's next year's problem - the school sets about creating order from the ground up.

Yes, there is a measure of regimentatiion in this but what is the alternative? Not a world of little individuals, each expressing themselves but the tribal world of the street, where every little label is a potential source of conflict. Schools try to insist on their own branding with its own aspirations. They are usually willing to go a long way to explain those values but some parents seem never to have overcome their own problems. What hope for their kids?

I'd love to think that kids in their natural state are creative anarchists, Jon. The truth is that there is just no natural state - just the street. At the risk of sounding rather old, I think the street should end at the school gate. :)
 

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I'm taking the side of the school in this instance. In an ideal world, she could have her hair how she wanted, and no-one'd bat an eyelid. However, as has been stated before, the performance of the school has increased since a strict uniform and behaviour code was implemented. All it takes is one person to be given a 'bye' from this code, and then the whole situation goes downhill. The freedom of the girl to have her hair how she wants cannot take priority over a system which has benefited the school and the pupils. All it would take would be for the school to concede, and the system which has been built to restore some credibility to the school would fall back down again, and that would benefit no-one.

Call me old-fashioned, but to learn discipline at an early age can only benefit you later on in life, because you realise that you have to act within boundaries, whether you believe that they inhibit your freedom to do as you wish or not. This isn't just an issue about one girl's chavvy hairdo, it's an issue about the futures of all the other pupils at the school, and if she's the one to lose out, then so be it. Needs of many > Needs of few.
 
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James... im calm now lol... i went to school in St Albans, to a school that told me it was the best and had some sort of vendeta with the school down the road. So that every monstros brechig of "rules" was greeted with either being sent home (to an empty house probably) or detenetion for a week (thats after the government stoped em caneing people).. whiel its true that i dint lie kit, i wasnt the one gettign detention etc i was genuinely too scared.... thats my main memory of school, fear and feeling sick every morning (genuinly sick from nerves).... i dont think i was ever frightened by the other pupils just the teachers... not a good way to spend an 11 year sentance.
 

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#23
I did sense that your own awful experiences were colouring your response to this story, Jon. I reckon if we had a terrible teachers thread, it would pile on a lot of posts. I could add a few myself.

I think it is a real problem for schools to establish what are reasonable standards of behaiviour, these days. Yes, they do risk going out on a limb because outside the school gate almost anything seems to go.

I hate being regimented myself but my rebellions were usually limited to reading everything I wasn't supposed to know about. :shock:
 
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Anonymous

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lol james how did you sense that!..ok i made it prity obviose... ever heard the Wall (pink floyd).. i cant listen to it.. that voice.. scots "Stand Still Laddie" etc... that was the dept head at our school...i think they must have got him to record it.... gre't big bloke with a bullet bald head who would shake with anger, deranged i think... oddly tho i never got in trouble, never did anything out of the ordinary, just quaked. Anyway i dont think that a daft hairstyle is reason to exclude a pupil. Draw the line but draw it somewhere else id say.
 

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#25
However, as has been stated before, the performance of the school has increased since a strict uniform and behaviour code was implemented.
Had they introduced mandatory gherkins for dinner at the same time, might we not conclude that gherkin eating was responsible for the improvement in performance? Or that they improved in spite of it?:D

How is this 'performance' evaluated anyway? If they're talking about exam grades, those could be improved simply by refusing to enter for exams pupils who they think will fail or do very badly, while the overall standard of education remains the same.
 

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#26
BRF, you seem to be implying that it is a confidence trick. Yes, the Failing School v. Renamed-Renewed School trick is exactly that. No one has changed the catchment area, they have merely tried to adjust the perceptions of the pupils who attend.

They are now going to a school which makes some demands.

This is not a painless process - especially not when it labels the earlier regime as having failed, when its failure was more or less assured, given their limited powers.

However, having seen all stages of this process in various schools, I have to say that it is a confidence trick which sometimes works.

It's far from perfect. Your alternatives please? :)
 

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#27
Actually I was having a poke at people who I thought were screwing this one for mileage, you're right in saying that the situation is not at all simple, I just don't care for an approach that more or less reduces this to unplaited hair=good grades, or suggests that if the school stands for this it's the end of western civilisation.

It seems here that both sides have tried to make some kind of compromise, neither of which was acceptable to the other, and the whole thing has turned sour, to the detriment of the pupil involved. If nothing else it strikes me as being blown horribly out of proportion.
 

ArthurASCII

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#28
Slightly off-topic, but there was a hilarious but thought-proving letter in the Indie the other week when the debate about the girl who wore a jibjab to school was raging. It went something along the lines of:

Sir,

At my Secondary school, the wearing of long flowing robes that covered the body, legs, arms and most of the head was openly tolerated. We called these individuals nuns; they were our teachers.
 

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#29
BlackRiverFalls said:
I just don't care for an approach that more or less reduces this to unplaited hair=good grades, or suggests that if the school stands for this it's the end of western civilisation.
It's not simply about this girl's hair though is it? Her hair is symbolic of the attitude engendered by the previous administration of the school whereby the rules were ignored.

Now that they have a system in place which works, what would be the point of letting the horse buckaroo just because one person is trying to make a point about some perceived right to do how they please?
 
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