Science Fiction: Films & TV

Timble2

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Saw Matrix Resurrections, today. Thomas Anderson is a chronically depressed Software Designer, whose bit hit was a trilogy of games 20 years ago, called The Matrix, and the gaming company Deus Machina, he works for have been ordered by the owning company, Warner Brothers, to produce a fourth instalment. Then he meets a woman in a coffee shop called Tiffany, who seems strangely familiar and resembles one of the characters in his games. Then events from the games start to break in, and he meets a character from the game who offers him a choice. This sequel brings back a lot of the characters from the originals, some of very changed, there's more the of twistiness about levels of reality than in the others sequels, and though it doesn't stint on the action sequences, they're not so overloaded as in the other sequels. Also they restore some of the mystery as to who or what some of the characters are. A solid sequel though it can't reach the originality of the first Matrix. It's also a bit Meta.

I've mentioned elsewhere that I get Migraine Aura without Headache, scintillating scotomata, and the slight feeling of light-headedness and disconnection added something to this film.
 

sherbetbizarre

Special Branch
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FB_IMG_1641502562576.jpg
 

Zeke Newbold

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STELLAR MIND is a new science fiction film release from Russia by KD Studios - and is the first attempt at this genre by a 38 year old director (Vyacheslav Liznetsky). It's arrival has been rumoured for some time and I was expecting it to be more of an Epic than it turned out to be. About this I am glad: I am no giant fan of Epics. the film is not a great one, but it is likeable and has a streak of romanticism that marks it out as a Russian product.

The earth in the near future is poisoned by a virus that is affecting all of the biosphere. A project - Project Gemini - has been set up to locate an Earth like planet which could be terraformed into a new home for humanity.

A team of 6 astronauts/scientists lead by Doctor Stephen Ross (the up and coming Egor Koreshkov) sets out to such a new planet. However, on arrival they are menaced by an alien being that resents their intrusion upon it's world.

In terms of plot, this begins as Interstellar meets Alien (although diverges from both a little bit as things proceed.) There are no surprises here: whilst in visual terms it can hold its own alongside any contemporary Hollywood product, the general look of everything borrows heavily from the Alien rulebook set out way back in 1979: chunky iron doored interiors, extravagant looking computer consoles and a rocky, forbidding planet's surface (actually filmed in Khazakhstan).

One twist is that the alien monster - an otherwise predictable Lovecraftian tentacled bogey - is in fact a robot. (Actually, there were some other big twists in the plot which I think I missed owing to my pathetic Russian level).

One perplexing aspect of this film is that all the characters have Western names and the signs, the computer read outs and the insignia on their uniforms are all in English. I presume this is a rather desperate, and sad, attempt to ensure that this becomes an export product (as well as an unnecessary one: both Sputnik and Outpost have done well abroad, despite both being overtly Russian).

Another perplexing aspect of it is the strange mix of very near future and fantastical far future technology on show here. For example, the main spacecraft involved (Encounter) looks very much like the standard space shuttles that we have now - and it is launched by a standard rocket of the kind that we are familiar with in the present. Yet later we see it entering an interdimensional wormhole of the kind familiar to science fiction devotees but very far from our current technology.

There was one (pleasant) casting surprise. The all male /all white screw are joined by a black woman. She is played by one Liza Martinez, who is, in fact, a Russian*. Perhaps I ought not to be surprised, but in all honesty, I was.

Here we have straight down the line science fiction: it is not horror, not military nor adventure (although all of these elements do make brief appearances). It is a well-behaved 12+ film aimed (partly) at tweenies and teens. However, I sat in an almost empty cinema theatre - so perhaps the intended audience were all watching whatever the latest Disney blockbuster is out there at the moment.

In Russian cinemas NOW - or wait for the dubbed DVD to appear.
Svesdni Razum 1.jpg

*Likewise, I recently saw a Russian Black female stand up comedian on Russian TV. She was bringing the house down. So....
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
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I suffered through “The Eternals “ and what the “ h—- “.

The writers must have said “ how complicated we can make this movie to fry everyone’s brain “.
 

GNC

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Is it true that in the book Soylent Green was based on, it's actually a mixture of soya and lentils? Not quite as dramatic, very good for you, in fact, good for the heart!
 

ramonmercado

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Is it true that in the book Soylent Green was based on, it's actually a mixture of soya and lentils? Not quite as dramatic, very good for you, in fact, good for the heart!

Yeah that was it, the novel was Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison. I preferred the film.
 

GNC

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Yeah that was it, the novel was Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison. I preferred the film.

I mostly know Harrison for The Stainless Steel Rat books, which were great fun. There's a franchise for you, Hollywood! Don't do Dune again!
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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I mostly know Harrison for The Stainless Steel Rat books, which were great fun. There's a franchise for you, Hollywood! Don't do Dune again!
Yes, I am amazed that nobody has tried to create a TV or film series of the Stainless Steel Rat. I had all the books, before I foolishly gave them all away.
 

GNC

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Yes, I am amazed that nobody has tried to create a TV or film series of the Stainless Steel Rat. I had all the books, before I foolishly gave them all away.

Really good, weren't they? I wonder if the rights are up for grabs? (Harrison passed away a few years ago)
 

ramonmercado

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I mostly know Harrison for The Stainless Steel Rat books, which were great fun. There's a franchise for you, Hollywood! Don't do Dune again!

I want to see Dune Part 2 but I'd love to see an SSR series.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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Really good, weren't they? I wonder if the rights are up for grabs? (Harrison passed away a few years ago)
Another series of books that would make great cinema is the Deathworld series by Harrison.
I do wish they'd get on with it!
 

Zeke Newbold

Carbon based biped.
Joined
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Messages
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STELLAR MIND is a new science fiction film release from Russia by KD Studios - and is the first attempt at this genre by a 38 year old director (Vyacheslav Liznetsky). It's arrival has been rumoured for some time and I was expecting it to be more of an Epic than it turned out to be. About this I am glad: I am no giant fan of Epics. the film is not a great one, but it is likeable and has a streak of romanticism that marks it out as a Russian product.

The earth in the near future is poisoned by a virus that is affecting all of the biosphere. A project - Project Gemini - has been set up to locate an Earth like planet which could be terraformed into a new home for humanity.

A team of 6 astronauts/scientists lead by Doctor Stephen Ross (the up and coming Egor Koreshkov) sets out to such a new planet. However, on arrival they are menaced by an alien being that resents their intrusion upon it's world.

In terms of plot, this begins as Interstellar meets Alien (although diverges from both a little bit as things proceed.) There are no surprises here: whilst in visual terms it can hold its own alongside any contemporary Hollywood product, the general look of everything borrows heavily from the Alien rulebook set out way back in 1979: chunky iron doored interiors, extravagant looking computer consoles and a rocky, forbidding planet's surface (actually filmed in Khazakhstan).

One twist is that the alien monster - an otherwise predictable Lovecraftian tentacled bogey - is in fact a robot. (Actually, there were some other big twists in the plot which I think I missed owing to my pathetic Russian level).

One perplexing aspect of this film is that all the characters have Western names and the signs, the computer read outs and the insignia on their uniforms are all in English. I presume this is a rather desperate, and sad, attempt to ensure that this becomes an export product (as well as an unnecessary one: both Sputnik and Outpost have done well abroad, despite both being overtly Russian).

Another perplexing aspect of it is the strange mix of very near future and fantastical far future technology on show here. For example, the main spacecraft involved (Encounter) looks very much like the standard space shuttles that we have now - and it is launched by a standard rocket of the kind that we are familiar with in the present. Yet later we see it entering an interdimensional wormhole of the kind familiar to science fiction devotees but very far from our current technology.

There was one (pleasant) casting surprise. The all male /all white screw are joined by a black woman. She is played by one Liza Martinez, who is, in fact, a Russian*. Perhaps I ought not to be surprised, but in all honesty, I was.

Here we have straight down the line science fiction: it is not horror, not military nor adventure (although all of these elements do make brief appearances). It is a well-behaved 12+ film aimed (partly) at tweenies and teens. However, I sat in an almost empty cinema theatre - so perhaps the intended audience were all watching whatever the latest Disney blockbuster is out there at the moment.

In Russian cinemas NOW - or wait for the dubbed DVD to appear.
View attachment 50524
*Likewise, I recently saw a Russian Black female stand up comedian on Russian TV. She was bringing the house down. So....
The English language DVD of this - as Project Gemini - is due out this March.

https://www.gruv.com/product/project_gemini_dvd
 

ramonmercado

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These guys are the biz! Vid at link.

The Critics Company: Nigerian teenagers who became sci-fi sensations

Nine teenage boys in the Nigerian city of Kaduna started experimenting with making sci-fi films in 2016.

They borrowed smartphones from family members, and made tripods out of wood. Three years later, their first short film became a sensation, drawing the attention of millions of people, including Hollywood Stars.

The BBC’s Damilola Oduolowu met the young film-makers in Nigeria to hear their story.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-60159798
 

Bigphoot2

Not sprouts! I hate sprouts.
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Messages
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A TV sequel to The Man Who Fell to Earth is in the pipeline with Bill Nighy as an older version of Bowie's character

‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’: Bill Nighy To Play Iconic David Bowie Character In Showtime Drama Series​

nellie-andreeva-1.jpg

By Nellie Andreeva

Nellie Andreeva

Co-Editor-in-Chief, TV
@DeadlineNellie

February 3, 2022 1:30pm

Bill Nighy (Love Actually) has been tapped to star opposite Chiwetel Ejiofor and Naomie Harris in Showtime’s The Man Who Fell To Earth drama series, based on the Walter Tevis novel and the cult classic 1976 film starring David Bowie. Nighy will take over the role played by Bowie in the film.
Showtime’s The Man Who Fell To Earth, which comes from Alex Kurtzman, Jenny Lumet and John Hlavin, will follow a new alien character (Ejiofor) who arrives on Earth at a turning point in human evolution and must confront his own past to determine our future.
Nighy will play the brilliant Thomas Newton, the first alien to arrive on earth over 40 years ago. Alone and desperate, Newton summons Faraday (Ejiofor) to complete his original mission. But Newton’s time marooned among human beings has cost him everything, possibly even his sanity.
https://deadline.com/2022/02/the-ma...e-character-showtime-drama-series-1234926160/
 

GNC

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But in the film, Bowie stays the same age while everyone else gets older!
 

ramonmercado

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Moonfall: I Canna Change The Laws Of Physics! Well you can if you're a Type III Civilisation on the Kardashev scale. Building a Moon sized artificial satellite would be easy. But what if something went wrong with the machinery and the Moon's orbit moved closer to Earthjy What if a strange apparently intelligent nano-swarm attacks and kills astronauts sent to investigate? Well you'd just have to round up an unfairly dismissed astronaut and the a former astronaut who is now NASA's Deputy Director to save the day. And throw in a conspiracy theorist for laughs. Some really great scenes of machinery on a cosmic scale and cities inundated by floods, earthquakes, pieces of the Moon striking Earth. Not a classic but the narrative doesn't outstay it's welcome at 130 minutes. Shades of 2001, Armageddon, Ringworld and Dyson Spheres. Directed and Co-Written by Roland Emmerich. 7/10.

In cinemas.
 

GNC

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Messages
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Mark Kermode said Moonfall was hilariously bad, so much in fact that it was worth watching. Seems to have flopped, anyway, everybody went to see jackass forever instead.
 

charliebrown

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Noooo—- say it’s not so !

Netflix has green lighted “ Blade Runner 2099 “ with Ridley Scott.

Blade Runner made in 1982 was bad.

Blade Runner 2049 was horrible.

Blade Runner 2099 will push people to go screaming through the streets mad.
 

ramonmercado

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Noooo—- say it’s not so !

Netflix has green lighted “ Blade Runner 2099 “ with Ridley Scott.

Blade Runner made in 1982 was bad.

Blade Runner 2049 was horrible.

Blade Runner 2099 will push people to go screaming through the streets mad.

How dare you!

A Blade Runner will hunt you down for that!
 

What Tyler

Spoon, Jar, Jar, Spoon...
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Dec 5, 2021
Messages
150
Noooo—- say it’s not so !

Netflix has green lighted “ Blade Runner 2099 “ with Ridley Scott.

Blade Runner made in 1982 was bad.

Blade Runner 2049 was horrible.

Blade Runner 2099 will push people to go screaming through the streets mad.
Sorry- couldn’t disagree more love both BR’s...we have to have thought provoking, well made Sci Fi filums -as an antidote to the likes of Moonfall...!!
 

Mr. Banooka

Abominable Snowman
Joined
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Messages
564
Noooo—- say it’s not so !

Netflix has green lighted “ Blade Runner 2099 “ with Ridley Scott.

Blade Runner made in 1982 was bad.

Blade Runner 2049 was horrible.

Blade Runner 2099 will push people to go screaming through the streets mad.
Not just me then.

By all counts, based on my sci-fi preferences, Blade Runner should be right up there on my favourites list.

Yet it does nothing for me.
 
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