Science Fiction

Zeke Newbold

Carbon based biped.
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
701
Likes
1,045
Points
134
let us know if its worth it as my monthly audible is coming up.
Just finished The Hatching and, on balance, I'd give the book the thumbs up, with some caveats. Boone takes what is a rather silly premise but writes it up well enough to create something vivd and memorable. In particular there is some good solid characterisation - I was almost reminded of Whyndam at times - even if I didn't find any of the characters all that likeable.

But the reservations. I've already metioned the lack of a scientific exposition. These spiders act in swarms and actively attack people - which the book itself points out is untypical arachnid behaviour. The rationale given - that these are a previously unlisted type of spider just seems lame, and you know that the spiders are another zombie apocalypse routine in another guise. (You could contrast this with Guy N. Smith's The Locusts from - oh, a long time back - where there is a convincing, researched scenario).

Then you realise that the novel is just Book One of an ambitious projected cycle and... well am I really the only person left in the world who appreciates a self-contained story!? So you do feel a little shortchanged when it becomes apparent that the whole thing is just setting up the background to a much longer multi-book money spinner.

Oh, and it is all rather gloomy, too much so, and could do with a bit of light relief here and there.

So, it's worth a read, but I won't be catching any of the sequels. On principle.
 

Naughty_Felid

No longer interesting
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
5,525
Likes
5,485
Points
294
I really the only person left in the world who appreciates a self-contained story!?
Have you tried Aurora? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(novel)

I can see why a lot of people thought this was the best SF novel of 2015.

A multi-generational crew man a starship 160 years out to Tau Ceti to start a new world.

Brilliant.

5 out of 5.

The wiki page when talking about themes is pretty thin it's so much more than that.

Says so much about us and our planet, our space program, climate change. Read or hear the last chapter by a beach.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
46,781
Likes
17,147
Points
284
Location
Eblana
Interesting article on The Futurians and their legacy.

Mutate or Die: Eighty Years of the Futurians’ Vision
By Sean Guynes-Vishniac

OCTOBER 30, 1937. Packed into the small meeting space of the Third Eastern Science Fiction Convention in Philadelphia, roughly 20 attendees listened as Donald A. Wollheim delivered a provocative essay written by his friend, fellow New York Fan Association (NYFA) member John Michel, whose stutter was too intense for public speaking. The essay “Mutation or Death!” was nothing less than a call for a revolution within the nascent science fiction and fantasy (SFF) community. In it, Michel proclaimed, “The Science Fiction Age […] is over.” Despite the fact that it had only been 11 years since Hugo Gernsback began publishing Amazing Stories and launched the so-called Golden Age of SFF pulps, the genre was, in Michel’s view, “dead” from “intellectual bankruptcy.”

This must have come as a shock to the attendees, who likely assumed science fiction was alive and well, believing that it bore great ideas and predictions about the future of humanity. It soon became clear that what Michel meant by his galling declaration of SFF’s death was that the genre lacked a “politics,” and thus was devoid of a purpose beyond mere entertainment.

If John Michel is remembered for anything in the science fiction community — and he’s certainly not beloved on account of his fiction, which has gone almost entirely uncollected in the 70-ish years since he stopped writing — it’s for his controversial speech that October, because it was this speech that launched the movement toward organized politics in the SFF community. ...

https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/mutate-or-die-eighty-years-of-the-futurians-vision/
 

Naughty_Felid

No longer interesting
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
5,525
Likes
5,485
Points
294
Interesting article on The Futurians and their legacy.

Mutate or Die: Eighty Years of the Futurians’ Vision
By Sean Guynes-Vishniac

OCTOBER 30, 1937. Packed into the small meeting space of the Third Eastern Science Fiction Convention in Philadelphia, roughly 20 attendees listened as Donald A. Wollheim delivered a provocative essay written by his friend, fellow New York Fan Association (NYFA) member John Michel, whose stutter was too intense for public speaking. The essay “Mutation or Death!” was nothing less than a call for a revolution within the nascent science fiction and fantasy (SFF) community. In it, Michel proclaimed, “The Science Fiction Age […] is over.” Despite the fact that it had only been 11 years since Hugo Gernsback began publishing Amazing Stories and launched the so-called Golden Age of SFF pulps, the genre was, in Michel’s view, “dead” from “intellectual bankruptcy.”

This must have come as a shock to the attendees, who likely assumed science fiction was alive and well, believing that it bore great ideas and predictions about the future of humanity. It soon became clear that what Michel meant by his galling declaration of SFF’s death was that the genre lacked a “politics,” and thus was devoid of a purpose beyond mere entertainment.

If John Michel is remembered for anything in the science fiction community — and he’s certainly not beloved on account of his fiction, which has gone almost entirely uncollected in the 70-ish years since he stopped writing — it’s for his controversial speech that October, because it was this speech that launched the movement toward organized politics in the SFF community. ...

https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/mutate-or-die-eighty-years-of-the-futurians-vision/
He's not even mentioned in the index of Trillion Year Spree which is pretty odd.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
46,781
Likes
17,147
Points
284
Location
Eblana
I think I may have read one or two of these stories, I'll put the book on my list.

David Bunch’s Prophetic Dystopia
Jeff VanderMeer

It’s been hard to get your hands on David R. Bunch’s best-known work for almost half a century now. Most of the Moderan stories—linked, fable-like tales written in an experimental mode, set on an Earth ravaged by nuclear holocaust—were published during the 1960s and 1970s in magazines and later gathered, along with several additional stories, in Moderan, a collection put out by Avon in 1971. Outside of specialist circles, Bunch has been all but forgotten, the original Moderan volume long out of print.

Yet, in the years since his most prolific period, the nightmarish dystopia he imagined has begun to look increasingly prescient, even prophetic. In Moderan, men who have violently transformed themselves into cybernetic strongholds battle across an Earth paved over with plastic and tunneled under with living quarters. Creature comforts for these men—who are portrayed with sympathy but, first and foremost, as products of a culture of toxic masculinity—include sex robots and seasonal cheer, from spring flowers to Christmas wreaths, regulated by technocrats. ...

https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/...tter&utm_term=David Bunchs Prophetic Dystopia
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
46,781
Likes
17,147
Points
284
Location
Eblana
Good news for us nerds.

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY READERS MAKE GOOD ROMANTIC PARTNERS
New research suggests they have more mature ideas about how real-world relationships work.
TOM JACOBS JUL 31, 2018
  • New research suggests fans of those genres have more mature beliefs about romantic relationships than readers who gravitate toward suspense, romance, or even highbrow literature.

    "Individuals who scored higher for exposure to science fiction/fantasy were less likely to endorse four unrealistic relationship beliefs," writes a research team led by psychologist Stephanie C. Stern of the University of Oklahoma. "Romance is not the only written fiction genre to be associated with real-world beliefs about romantic relationships."

    The study, in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, featured 404 adults (a bit more than half of them female) who were recruited online. Their exposure to seven literary genres—classics, contemporary literary fiction, romance, fantasy, science fiction, suspense/thriller, and horror—was measured in a test in which they were asked to identify the names of authors who specialized in each. ...

https://psmag.com/news/science-fiction-and-fantasy-readers-make-good-romantic-partners
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
46,781
Likes
17,147
Points
284
Location
Eblana
This book sounds interesting.

Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction Alec Nevala-LeeDey Street (2018)

Alec Nevala-Lee’s Astounding is a fascinating collective portrait of four men who, together and apart, helped to shape modern science fiction. They were the legendary, irascible John W. Campbell Jr, long-time editor of the magazine Astounding Science Fiction (later Analog), and three of his key writers. Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein became giants of the genre. L. Ron Hubbard, by contrast, was a prolific purveyor of pulp fiction (and future founder of the Church of Scientology).

Under Campbell’s editorship, Astounding was transformed during the late 1930s and 1940s from a showcase for space-opera schlock into a serious venue for futuristic extrapolation, often written by professional scientists such as Asimov, a biochemist, and electronics engineer George O. Smith. That era has become known as science fiction’s golden age. Nevala-Lee — himself a science-fiction writer — delivers a compelling account of its hopeful rise and ignominious fall.

Pivotal in this trajectory was the massive, lingering impact of the Second World War on the magazine and its stable of authors, several of whom were drawn into military research. Asimov, Heinlein and fellow Astounding regular L. Sprague de Camp tested war materials at the Philadelphia Navy Yards in Pennsylvania from 1942. Campbell, under the aegis of the University of California’s Division of War Research, led a team of authors revising technical manuals for military use. He also joined Heinlein and de Camp in brainstorming unconventional responses to kamikaze attacks, such as detecting approaching aeroplanes using sound. ...

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41...=social&utm_campaign=naturenews&sf199886429=1
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
25,670
Likes
9,401
Points
284
@Yithian

Couldn't work out how to reply on the status, so I'll say here: The Black Hole is a beautifully designed sci-fi epic, but it it's basically 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea in space, and doesn't quite match their earlier hit. You can see why it wasn't a success, it is grim and gloomy, even with a great cast of over the hill venerable stars. Maximillian is an excellent baddie (both of them). And Roddy McDowall is a great robot voice.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
46,781
Likes
17,147
Points
284
Location
Eblana
Robert A. Heinlein is back - as a character in Gregory Benford's new novel. Looking forward to it.

ROBERT HEINLEIN IS the legendary author of such classic works as Starship Troopers, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, and Stranger in a Strange Land. His books have influenced generations of artists and scientists, including physicist and science fiction writer Gregory Benford.

“He was one of the people who propelled me forward to go into the sciences,” Benford says in Episode 348 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “Because his depiction of the prospect of the future of science, engineering—everything—was so enticing. He was my favorite science fiction writer.”

Heinlein appears as a character in Benford’s new novel, a time travel thriller called Rewrite. The novel depicts Heinlein as a MacGyver-esque man of action who dispatches his enemies with the aid of improvised traps. Benford, who met Heinlein in the late 1960s and knew him throughout his life, says this is an extremely accurate portrayal. ...

Listen to the complete interview with Gregory Benford in Episode 348 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above). And check out some highlights from the discussion below. ...

https://www.wired.com/2019/02/geeks-guide-gregory-benford/
 

James_H

And I like to roam the land
Joined
May 18, 2002
Messages
5,996
Likes
2,667
Points
234
Robert A. Heinlein is back - as a character in Gregory Benford's new novel. Looking forward to it.

ROBERT HEINLEIN IS the legendary author of such classic works as Starship Troopers, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, and Stranger in a Strange Land. His books have influenced generations of artists and scientists, including physicist and science fiction writer Gregory Benford.

“He was one of the people who propelled me forward to go into the sciences,” Benford says in Episode 348 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “Because his depiction of the prospect of the future of science, engineering—everything—was so enticing. He was my favorite science fiction writer.”

Heinlein appears as a character in Benford’s new novel, a time travel thriller called Rewrite. The novel depicts Heinlein as a MacGyver-esque man of action who dispatches his enemies with the aid of improvised traps. Benford, who met Heinlein in the late 1960s and knew him throughout his life, says this is an extremely accurate portrayal. ...

Listen to the complete interview with Gregory Benford in Episode 348 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above). And check out some highlights from the discussion below. ...

https://www.wired.com/2019/02/geeks-guide-gregory-benford/
He made a hit-and-miss writer and probably not a great guy, but by God would Heinlein make a great character.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
25,670
Likes
9,401
Points
284
The ageing, militaristic libertarian trying to get down with the kids? Ripe for parody, maybe.
 

brownmane

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
147
Likes
227
Points
43
Location
Ontario, Canada
I only read some sci-fi as I tend to read more horror/dark fantasy, but have read Stranger in a Strange Land. It was loaned from a friend. Very good story.
So many books, so little time...
 

Jim

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jan 19, 2016
Messages
800
Likes
718
Points
94
Location
NYS, USA
Watched "Apollo 18" , an under wraps mission sent to the moon by the DOD (vs NASA) to find out what happened to an earlier ill-fated Soviet landing that didn't bode well. Have seen better special effects however the movie use of a creepy - suspenseful story line and the nasties finally show themselves.




s
 
Top