Sea Serpents & Monsters

AlchoPwn

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I assume I am not alone in supposing that given the body of evidence, that there may well be a species of cryptid that is quite rare, of a large marine reptile-like animal that is quite capable of entering fresh water, and that accounts for so-called lake monsters occurring in multiple locations? Not so much a single Loch Ness Monster or Ogopogo etc, but a trans-atlantic species with an unknown range and an unknown depth, that is able to find its way in and out of bodies of fresh water that it periodically visits to feed. We must assume they don't breed in fresh water, or we may have detected their spawn.

As to sea serpents; some eels get pretty big, and so do some snakes.
 

gordonrutter

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I assume I am not alone in supposing that given the body of evidence, that there may well be a species of cryptid that is quite rare, of a large marine reptile-like animal that is quite capable of entering fresh water, and that accounts for so-called lake monsters occurring in multiple locations? Not so much a single Loch Ness Monster or Ogopogo etc, but a trans-atlantic species with an unknown range and an unknown depth, that is able to find its way in and out of bodies of fresh water that it periodically visits to feed. We must assume they don't breed in fresh water, or we may have detected their spawn.

As to sea serpents; some eels get pretty big, and so do some snakes.
Well to get into Loch Ness it’s going to have to negotiate some Locks! But still undiscovered large marine animals, statistically, yes. For example see
Paxton, C. 1998. A cumulative species description curve for large open water marine animals. Journal of the Marine Biologists Association, U.K. 78, 1389-1391.
[FONT=Open Sans, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Abstract
[/FONT]
A cumulative species description curve (from 1830 to 1995) is given for open water marine fauna in excess of 2 m long in the major axis of the body. This curve has not yet closely approached its asymptote. Estimation by maximum likelihood fit of a hyperbola suggests a maximum of some 47 species awaiting formal scientific description and an approximate current rate of description of one new species every 5·3 years. Consideration of the most recently described species and recent observations by field workers suggests that any imminent species descriptions are most likely to be cetaceans.

The whole paper is not available online.
 

AlchoPwn

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Well to get into Loch Ness it’s going to have to negotiate some Locks! But still undiscovered large marine animals, statistically, yes.
Hmm... 6 miles to the sea, but there are a series of smaller streams and lakes all over the landscape leading to the sea. A catfish could do it, or an eel.
 

AlchoPwn

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Agreed but not really a large marine reptile then?
Well given we know nothing about the marine reptile in question... how can we really say? A crocodile could do it too, were it not for the nasty weather. IDK what plesiosaur cold resistance is like, but they could survive in the Atlantic so it can't have been too bad, assuming we are even dealing with a plesiosaur.
 

lordmongrove

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Whatever this is in #3.


Catfish like head on plesiosaur like body. Looks like a hoax with a model. However the first aquatic creature resembles a young beaked whale. The raised areas on the bottom jaw are pockets were the two knife like teeth are contained.
Stranded-specimen-involved-An-adult-old-male-Blainvilles-beaked-whale-Mesoplodon.png
 

Lord Lucan

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Aussie crypto-legend Tony Healy on the hunt for the Hawkesbury River Monster https://www.eyretribune.com.au/stor...NWfsFyJ4NxqKY7FZib6gKJ7OJgUoPd5dBVKjE#slide=0
I spent a lot of time on the Hawkesbury as a teenager as my folks has a charter boat there which I often went out on on weekends. I never saw anything strange there, although it's pretty murky water most of the time and I really wouldn't swim in it.
You occasionally hear reports of larger turtles, the occasional seal and dolphin there. One thing I do know and that's there's a lot of juvenile bull sharks in the shallower waters there.
It's a large expanse, lots of creeks, mangroves and inlets. It would be a great habitat for something unknown to live in.
 
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