Sheds: Plastic Vs Wood, & Cat Flaps

Recycled1

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The wooden shed at the bottom of my little garden is a disintegrating ruin, so I've got a man from a garden firm coming on Monday to give me a quote for a new one.

One of the reasons I haven't replaced it before, is that two neighbouring cats who have an owner but are NEVER allowed into their own home, sleep in my elderly ruin.

So.......whatever I buy new, needs to be able to have a cat sized hole cut in it. (Yes, I know I'm a softy!)

I like the idea of plastic for its not-rotting and no upkeep qualities, but I'm guessing you can't screw hooks into its inside walls the way you can with wood.
And could a hole be cut in a plastic shed?

Has anyone got any thoughts?
 

Mythopoeika

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The wooden shed at the bottom of my little garden is a disintegrating ruin, so I've got a man from a garden firm coming on Monday to give me a quote for a new one.

One of the reasons I haven't replaced it before, is that two neighbouring cats who have an owner but are NEVER allowed into their own home, sleep in my elderly ruin.

So.......whatever I buy new, needs to be able to have a cat sized hole cut in it. (Yes, I know I'm a softy!)

I like the idea of plastic for its not-rotting and no upkeep qualities, but I'm guessing you can't screw hooks into its inside walls the way you can with wood.
And could a hole be cut in a plastic shed?

Has anyone got any thoughts?
Depends on the type and thickness of the plastic. Some of the more expensive plastic sheds have thickish walls made from recycled plastic.
This is probably OK, because you can screw stuff directly to it.
How about a metal shed? You can attach lengths of wood (battens) to the main uprights inside, then you can screw stuff to the wood.
You might think, 'metal shed - rust' - but if you buy a good one, it'll last for years. I built one at my parents' place when I still lived there (i.e. about 30 years ago). Not a sign of rust anywhere. I remember my Dad being doubtful about it at the time and telling me that it'd rust. But he had to admit that I was right.

Edit: It looks like the thin wall plastic sheds (Keter, for example) have vertical rails inside for mounting shelves. You could attach wooden battens or shelves and screw hooks in. Example:
 
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Ringo

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I suppose you could cut a catflap sized hole in the door or wall (maybe the man giving you a quote coud advise in they could cut it for you). Otherwise a jigsaw or angle grinder would do - maybe even a good sharp knife depending upon the type and thickness of plastic. The catflap just sticks or screws into place.

But just because you put a cat flap into it doesn't mean the cats will want to use it. You may end up ruining your new shed for no reason.

And as far screwing hooks into the walls, some sheds come with racks and hook systems built into the frame/support structure. See what the man has to say.
 

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The wooden shed at the bottom of my little garden is a disintegrating ruin, so I've got a man from a garden firm coming on Monday to give me a quote for a new one.

One of the reasons I haven't replaced it before, is that two neighbouring cats who have an owner but are NEVER allowed into their own home, sleep in my elderly ruin.

So.......whatever I buy new, needs to be able to have a cat sized hole cut in it. (Yes, I know I'm a softy!)

I like the idea of plastic for its not-rotting and no upkeep qualities, but I'm guessing you can't screw hooks into its inside walls the way you can with wood.
And could a hole be cut in a plastic shed?

Has anyone got any thoughts?
get a wood shed and a kennel for the cats.
 

EnolaGaia

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Some of the plastic / resin sheds (at least among the ones sold here in the USA) have double-wall construction. This allows you to use screws on the inner walls.

Most metal sheds have an internal frame that could serve as the basis for shelving, hooks, etc.
 

Recycled1

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Yes, I shall discuss my needs with the man. :)

As some of you may know from my previous posts, I've got a very small house with an equally small garden- no room for extra kennels.
Plus, I'm 73, on my own and not into DIY.

I expect I'll end up with a wooden shed, as it should be relatively easy to remove one of the little overlapping pieces of wood that make the shed walls, either side of the door. This is how the cats got into my shed originally - a slat of wood fell out of its own accord.
Lots more has dropped off, since!

I must bite the bullet and not ask for the cheapest shed on the market! I need one ready creosoted (or the modern equivalent.)
 

Mythopoeika

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Yes, I shall discuss my needs with the man. :)

As some of you may know from my previous posts, I've got a very small house with an equally small garden- no room for extra kennels.
Plus, I'm 73, on my own and not into DIY.

I expect I'll end up with a wooden shed, as it should be relatively easy to remove one of the little overlapping pieces of wood that make the shed walls, either side of the door. This is how the cats got into my shed originally - a slat of wood fell out of its own accord.
Lots more has dropped off, since!

I must bite the bullet and not ask for the cheapest shed on the market! I need one ready creosoted (or the modern equivalent.)
You can get the suppliers to build the shed for you.
These guys look like they do good sheds and will build for you (Caveat: I can't make a personal recommendation as I've never bought from them):
http://www.beastsheds.co.uk/
Note: A 'tanalised' shed will last longer.
 

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I'd go for a wooden shed. Makes sure it's properly treated/painted. And repaint/retreat every few years.

If you look after the top and the bottom, the rest is easy.

Top: It will be a bit of an added expense, and depending on your circumstances you might need to get someone in to do it for you - but I'd recommend you don't just tack on the roof felt, but use a bituminous felt adhesive as well. This will stop the wind getting under and eventually ripping it off, which is generally the first thing to go wrong with an off the peg shed.

Bottom: Ensure there is airflow. Don't have it built directly on soil or grass - maybe put some flags underneath to act as bearers.

...it should be relatively easy to remove one of the little overlapping pieces of wood that make the shed walls, either side of the door. This is how the cats got into my shed originally - a slat of wood fell out of its own accord.
Lots more has dropped off, since!...
The walls will either be shiplap or tongue and groove. These rely on the individual lengths interlocking with each other to create structural integrity, so the problem with cutting bits out is that you compromise the area around; you can certainly do it, but maybe just frame around the area you chop out to fix the rest in place.

I'd also try and add a couple of small vents on opposite walls to create some airflow and stop condensation. My own shed was always soaking wet inside, but I couldn't find an obvious route for water ingress; when I put in the vents, the issue disappeared.
 
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