Sleep Deprivation

maureenmac1

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
126
Likes
2
Points
34
#1
No sleep means no new brain cells
Missing out on sleep may cause the brain to stop producing new cells, a study has suggested.
The work on rats, by a team from Princeton University found a lack of sleep affected the hippocampus, a brain region involved in forming memories.

The research in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science showed a stress hormone causes the effect.

A UK expert said it would be interesting to see if too little rather than no sleep had the same consequence.

Deficits

The researchers compared animals who were deprived of sleep for 72 hours with others who were not.

They found those who missed out on rest had higher levels of the stress hormone corticosterone.


It would be interesting to see if partial sleep deprivation - getting a little bit less sleep every night that you need - had the same effect
Dr Neil Stanley, sleep expert

They also produced significantly fewer new brain cells in a particular region of the hippocampus.

When the animals' corticosterone levels were kept at a constant level, the reduction in cell proliferation was abolished.

The results suggest that elevated stress hormone levels resulting from sleep deprivation could explain the reduction in cell production in the adult brain.

Sleep patterns were restored to normal within a week.

However levels of nerve cell production (neurogenesis) were not restored for two weeks, and the brain appears to boost its efforts in order to counteract the shortage.

Writing in PNAS, the researchers led by Dr Elizabeth Gould, said that although the role of nerve cell production in adults remained unknown, "the suppression of adult neurogenesis may underlie some of the cognitive deficits associated with prolonged sleep deprivation."

People who experience a lack of sleep experience concentration problems and other difficulties.

Sleep expert Dr Neil Stanley, based at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, said the study's findings could not be directly translated to humans because people did not go without sleep for 72 hours, unless they were in extreme circumstances.

But he added: "It is an interesting finding. It would be interesting to see if partial sleep deprivation - getting a little bit less sleep every night that you need - had the same effect."


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/h ... 347043.stm

Published: 2007/02/10 00:02:15 GMT

© BBC MMVII

(Feel free to move Mods, wasn't sure of the best place to post)
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,845
Likes
20,920
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#3
Researchers link compulsive Facebook checking to lack of sleep
Study correlates tiredness, crankiness, distractibility and social media browsing

Date:
February 4, 2016
Source:
University of California - Irvine
Summary:
If you find yourself toggling over to look at Facebook several dozen times a day, it's not necessarily because the experience of being on social media is so wonderful. It may be a sign that you're not getting enough sleep.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160204151052.htm
 

Jim

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jan 19, 2016
Messages
959
Likes
960
Points
94
Location
NYS, USA
#4
Researchers link compulsive Facebook checking to lack of sleep
Study correlates tiredness, crankiness, distractibility and social media browsing

Date:
February 4, 2016
Source:
University of California - Irvine
Summary:
If you find yourself toggling over to look at Facebook several dozen times a day, it's not necessarily because the experience of being on social media is so wonderful. It may be a sign that you're not getting enough sleep.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160204151052.htm
It's not supposed to be funny. But it sure made me snicker. I know people that post so often I had to unfollowed them, it was nauseating. Now how many Fortean addicts are out there and how's their sleeping habits?
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,845
Likes
20,920
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#5
It's not supposed to be funny. But it sure made me snicker. I know people that post so often I had to unfollowed them, it was nauseating. Now how many Fortean addicts are out there and how's their sleeping habits?
Twitter can be just as bad.

My sleep is ok at the moment but I think I may have another virus.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
48,845
Likes
20,920
Points
284
Location
Eblana
#12
The body of 14-year-old Crystal Champagne was found underneath a bridge in Louisiana in 1996, an electrical cord wrapped around her neck and her clothes in disarray. It didn’t take long to find the man who did it: within a couple of days, her cousin Damon Thibodeaux confessed to police on tape that he had raped and murdered her.

In fact, Thibodeaux had nothing to do with the crime, as DNA evidence would later confirm. But he paid a heavy price for his false statement, spending 15 years in solitary confinement on death row before being released.

Although hard to fathom, false confessions happen surprisingly often; they are thought to play a role in up to a quarter of wrongful convictions in the US, according to the campaign group the Innocence Project. In many cases, as in Thibodeaux’s, the suspect was profoundly sleep deprived during their police interviews.

Now a study has shed more light on how easily severe exhaustion can lead to this type of false confession. Legal experts are predicting it will be cited in future court cases. “It’s a milestone,” says Lawrence Sherman, head of the Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge.

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...paign=hoot&cmpid=SOC|NSNS|2016-GLOBAL-twitter
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
13,694
Likes
16,040
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
#13
Here's a review / reminiscence by a person who went 11 full days without sleep for a science project. At one time he was cited as having performed the longest-known stretch of deliberate sleeplessness. I don't know whether this record is still standing / recognized.

The Haunting Effects Of Going Days Without Sleep
Decades ago, Randy Gardner stayed awake for 11 days. He broke a record in the process, but the teenage stunt has come back to haunt him. At 71, he offers wisdom about staying up past your bedtime. ...
RADIO INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT: https://www.npr.org/2017/12/27/5737...out-sleep?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=science
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
26,482
Likes
23,674
Points
309
Location
HM The Tower of London
#14
The Queen has trouble sleeping, it seems, according to the Times, and sometime this last year she took up walking the ground of the Palace at night. She bumped into a guardsman who said 'Blimey, your majesty, I nearly shot you!'

Now THAT would've be a story!
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
13,694
Likes
16,040
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
#16
Sleep deprivation affects the brain's ability to generate essential proteins employed in neural functions ...
Sleep Deprivation Shuts Down Production of Essential Brain Proteins

A deficit arises in molecules needed for neurons to communicate efficiently

Most of us could use more sleep. We feel it in our urge for an extra cup of coffee and in a slipping cognitive grasp as a busy day grinds on. And sleep has been strongly tied to our thinking, sharpening it when we get enough and blunting it when we get too little.

What produces these effects are familiar to neuroscientists: external light and dark signals that help set our daily, or circadian, rhythms, “clock” genes that act as internal timekeepers, and neurons that signal to one another through connections called synapses. But how these factors interact to freshen a brain once we do sleep has remained enigmatic.

Findings published on October 10 in two papers in Science place synapses at center stage. These nodes of neuronal communication, researchers show, are where internal preparations for sleep and the effects of our sleep-related behaviors converge. Cellular timekeepers rhythmically prep areas around the synapses in anticipation of building synaptic proteins during slumber. But the new findings indicate neurons don’t end up building these critical proteins in the absence of sleep. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.scientificamerican.com/...-down-production-of-essential-brain-proteins/
 
Top