Snow Rollers: Rare & Beautiful Phenomenon

rynner2

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#1
This is new to me:

The amazing self-rolling 'snow bales' that show Mother Nature also likes to play
By Julian Gavaghan
Last updated at 9:12 PM on 17th April 2009

To some they are evidence of alien activity and to others proof that Mother Nature has a sense of humour.
But one thing is certain: these snow rollers seen on the prairies of southern Idaho are not man-made.
Firefighter Tim Tevebaugh was lucky enough to spot a field full of them while on his way home from work in the evening.

‘I hadn’t seen them on my morning drive, so they must have formed in the space of a few hours,’ said Mr Tevebaugh, who witnessed the scene eight miles east of Craigmont.
Each frozen hay bale-like formation was up to about 2ft high and not a single footprint could be seen surrounding them.

But despite claims of alien interference, snow rollers are understood by experts to be an extremely rare naturally occurring phenomenon.
They require just the right combination of temperature, humidity, wind speed, terrain and of course, snow.

The formation can only be created on flat or slightly rolling open ground that is covered with a smooth layer of ice or crusty snow.
Then, for the rollers to form, more snow should fall or drift on to the land The air temperature should remain at or slightly above freezing, from 0C to 1C.
Finally, they need a sustained spell of strong, gusty winds, at least 25mph, to form.
A gust of wind then scoops up a chunk of snow and rolls it a bit.
The new, wet snow clings together, while the icy surface below allows the chunk of snow to slide and roll easily.

Repeated gusts will move the new snowball again and again, allowing it to pick up more snow with each roll.
Eventually, it will either become too heavy for the wind to move, or it will encounter an obstacle such as vegetation or a slight rise in the terrain, at which point the snow roller will stop moving, leaving a trail behind it to mark its journey.

Given the precise set of conditions required, it’s easy to see why people rarely spot snow rollers.
In fact, many professional meteorologists have never seen one.
And not only do they form infrequently, they're pretty fragile. If the temperature should fall or rise, they’ll collapse.

Like the Idaho ones pictured at the end of last month, most snow rollers are believed to form on the plains of North America where the weather can change abruptly due to competing masses of cold and dry Arctic air and warmer, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... -play.html
 

Ermintruder

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#2
http://yr.no/artikkel/snoballen-rullet-seg-selv-1.12789454

(falteringly-translated from the Norwegian by Google Chrome)

Snowballed itself
On a field in Snåsa surfaced this snowball up - without anyone really had made it.

Where does it? - This has æ not seen before, writes Monika Stokke from Snåsa, adding that it was not an only footprints in the snow.

PHOTO: MONIKA STOKKE
Journalist Astrid Rommetveit 5 Feb 2016

Extreme Weather Tor had calmed down and at noon on Saturday 30 January went Monika and Ingvar Stokke from Snåsa in Nord-Trondelag traveling in the car. In a field they saw a big snowball, - maybe it had already been a child and played in snow?


Monika and Ingvar Stokke had never seen such snowballs - before they appeared outside their house.
- No, there was not a single track in the snow.That was what was so weird, says Monika.

When they looked up, it was a fascinating sight that met them.

- The entire field was full of balls. During a stretch of six kilometers we saw them many places, says Monika and says that the biggest snowballs had a diameter of 15-20 centimeters.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know
Monika posted the picture on Yr their facebook page and soon received a reply from several in the same area.


SEEN IT BEFORE: A few years ago was Mjøsa covered by such snowballs, says TV weatherman John Smit.

PHOTO: KALAND, OLE / OLE KALAND BROADCASTING CORPORATION
- Yes it's full too of them everywhere.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know.

TV meteorologist John Smit is also kept "on the ball".

- This is a great picture of vindrullede snowballs, he says and adds that it is a bit unusual sight.

- Snowballs formed when strong wind takes hold in wet and a little loose powder on and dislodges a small lump of snow from the surface. Then rolls the wind further over the slushy snow surface, and the snowball grows until it becomes too heavy to allow the wind to drop further.

It needs lots of power to create as big snowballs that the Monika has captured. Windreadings show that extreme weather Tor gave gale around Snåsa, but also that the gusts were significantly higher (26.6 m / sec).

Have you seen anything like this?
Now regrets Monika Stokke that she did not take more pictures to show the extent of it all.

- How do you explain that? It's hopeless. It's easier with pictures.

But perhaps some of Yr its readers seen anything like it? Please share with us on our facebook page, on Instagram #YRno or uploadyr.no/bilder .
 

rynner2

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#4
Pretty sure we've had reports of this on here before. Maybe in Weird Weather?
Don't have time to search now.
 

Ermintruder

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#5
I searched for 'snowballs' on the board before posting, but could find nothing like this. Most references seem to be regarding the comet/interplanetary variety, or metaphorical ones.
 

rynner2

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#7
I searched for 'snowballs' on the board before posting, but could find nothing like this.
Here we go!

The amazing self-rolling 'snow bales' that show Mother Nature also likes to play
By Julian Gavaghan
Last updated at 9:12 PM on 17th April 2009
...
http://forum.forteantimes.com/index.php?threads/weird-weather.16462/page-9#post-870392

and...

Rare self-rolling giant snow balls found in UK
They may look like winter's answer to crop circles, but these mysterious snow rolls are in fact a rare natural phenomenon usually found only in the world's most remote and frozen regions.
By Heidi Blake
Published: 9:45PM GMT 08 Jan 2010
...
http://forum.forteantimes.com/index.php?threads/weird-weather.16462/page-11#post-941434

(I found these not by ploughing through the whole weird weather thread, but by searching on 'snow rolls'. And the reason I was sure we had something on these was because I posted both of those stories, but I didn't realise that until I found them! It's reassuring to know that the Alzheimers hasn't kicked in yet!)
 

snailian

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#8
http://yr.no/artikkel/snoballen-rullet-seg-selv-1.12789454

(falteringly-translated from the Norwegian by Google Chrome)

Snowballed itself
On a field in Snåsa surfaced this snowball up - without anyone really had made it.

Where does it? - This has æ not seen before, writes Monika Stokke from Snåsa, adding that it was not an only footprints in the snow.

PHOTO: MONIKA STOKKE
Journalist Astrid Rommetveit 5 Feb 2016

Extreme Weather Tor had calmed down and at noon on Saturday 30 January went Monika and Ingvar Stokke from Snåsa in Nord-Trondelag traveling in the car. In a field they saw a big snowball, - maybe it had already been a child and played in snow?


Monika and Ingvar Stokke had never seen such snowballs - before they appeared outside their house.
- No, there was not a single track in the snow.That was what was so weird, says Monika.

When they looked up, it was a fascinating sight that met them.

- The entire field was full of balls. During a stretch of six kilometers we saw them many places, says Monika and says that the biggest snowballs had a diameter of 15-20 centimeters.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know
Monika posted the picture on Yr their facebook page and soon received a reply from several in the same area.


SEEN IT BEFORE: A few years ago was Mjøsa covered by such snowballs, says TV weatherman John Smit.

PHOTO: KALAND, OLE / OLE KALAND BROADCASTING CORPORATION
- Yes it's full too of them everywhere.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know.

TV meteorologist John Smit is also kept "on the ball".

- This is a great picture of vindrullede snowballs, he says and adds that it is a bit unusual sight.

- Snowballs formed when strong wind takes hold in wet and a little loose powder on and dislodges a small lump of snow from the surface. Then rolls the wind further over the slushy snow surface, and the snowball grows until it becomes too heavy to allow the wind to drop further.

It needs lots of power to create as big snowballs that the Monika has captured. Windreadings show that extreme weather Tor gave gale around Snåsa, but also that the gusts were significantly higher (26.6 m / sec).

Have you seen anything like this?
Now regrets Monika Stokke that she did not take more pictures to show the extent of it all.

- How do you explain that? It's hopeless. It's easier with pictures.

But perhaps some of Yr its readers seen anything like it? Please share with us on our facebook page, on Instagram #YRno or uploadyr.no/bilder .
Sou
http://yr.no/artikkel/snoballen-rullet-seg-selv-1.12789454

(falteringly-translated from the Norwegian by Google Chrome)

Snowballed itself
On a field in Snåsa surfaced this snowball up - without anyone really had made it.

Where does it? - This has æ not seen before, writes Monika Stokke from Snåsa, adding that it was not an only footprints in the snow.

PHOTO: MONIKA STOKKE
Journalist Astrid Rommetveit 5 Feb 2016

Extreme Weather Tor had calmed down and at noon on Saturday 30 January went Monika and Ingvar Stokke from Snåsa in Nord-Trondelag traveling in the car. In a field they saw a big snowball, - maybe it had already been a child and played in snow?


Monika and Ingvar Stokke had never seen such snowballs - before they appeared outside their house.
- No, there was not a single track in the snow.That was what was so weird, says Monika.

When they looked up, it was a fascinating sight that met them.

- The entire field was full of balls. During a stretch of six kilometers we saw them many places, says Monika and says that the biggest snowballs had a diameter of 15-20 centimeters.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know
Monika posted the picture on Yr their facebook page and soon received a reply from several in the same area.


SEEN IT BEFORE: A few years ago was Mjøsa covered by such snowballs, says TV weatherman John Smit.

PHOTO: KALAND, OLE / OLE KALAND BROADCASTING CORPORATION
- Yes it's full too of them everywhere.

- E'n Tor as layers derre y'know.

TV meteorologist John Smit is also kept "on the ball".

- This is a great picture of vindrullede snowballs, he says and adds that it is a bit unusual sight.

- Snowballs formed when strong wind takes hold in wet and a little loose powder on and dislodges a small lump of snow from the surface. Then rolls the wind further over the slushy snow surface, and the snowball grows until it becomes too heavy to allow the wind to drop further.

It needs lots of power to create as big snowballs that the Monika has captured. Windreadings show that extreme weather Tor gave gale around Snåsa, but also that the gusts were significantly higher (26.6 m / sec).

Have you seen anything like this?
Now regrets Monika Stokke that she did not take more pictures to show the extent of it all.

- How do you explain that? It's hopeless. It's easier with pictures.

But perhaps some of Yr its readers seen anything like it? Please share with us on our facebook page, on Instagram #YRno or uploadyr.no/bilder .
Sounds like a fair explanation...s'no bollocks!
 

Bigphoot2

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#9
Rare snow rollers spotted in Scottish field as strange weather phenomenon stuns dog walkers
The natural sculptures roll up in the style of a tumbleweed or a hay bale and leave a trail behind them showing how they were made.

  • SCOTLAND NOW

    Snow rollers have been spotted in a Scottish field (Image: SWNS)
    • SHARE
    Get Scotland Now Weekly updates directly to your inbox
    + Subscribe
    These fascinating pictures show hundreds of snow rollers - a strange and rare weather phenomenon consisting of naturally-made snowballs.

    The natural sculptures roll up in the style of a tumbleweed or a hay bale and leave a trail behind them showing how they were made.

    They are delicate and crumble completely at the slightest touch.

    Snow rollers can only be formed when the snow is cold but not frozen and the wind is strong enough to move snow but not break it.

  • etc
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/scotland-now/rare-snow-rollers-spotted-scottish-11872582
 

Bigphoot2

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#10
It'd be fascinating to see one of those things being formed.

Rare snow rollers spotted in field near Marlborough
  • 2 hours ago
Image copyrightBRIAN BAYLISSImage captionBrian Bayliss said he spotted the snow rollers as the sun rose on Saturday - but added by later that day they had collapsed
A rare natural phenomenon which makes it look like wheels of snow have been rolled on their own has been captured in photos.
Six rare "snow rollers" were spotted by Brian Bayliss in Wiltshire.
He said he spotted them in a field he owns and at first thought they had been manmade but there were no footprints.
It is thought the bales are formed when wind conditions are ideal to blow chunks of snow along, picking up more snow along the way.

etc
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-47108382
 

Frideswide

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#14
Please (someone :) ) explain the regular corrugations? in terms of teh mechanics of the thing
 

Bigphoot2

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#17
Yes, I should imagine it's moving in increments. It's possible that nobody has seen it actually rolling along.
That's because it was done by aliens. Wrong time of year for crop circles so they have to do something to pass the time.
 
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