Something New Every Day: Random & Newly Found Facts

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
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Yithian

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Same result. Curse my Englishness.
Text

A microwave works by passing radio waves at a frequency of 2.45 gigahertz through any food. Radio waves at this frequency have an interesting property: they are absorbed by water and fats. When absorbed, the water or fat molecules start rotating due to the alternating nature of the electric fields of the microwave. This atomic motion is directly converted into energy which is given out as heat.​
Now, coming to the question itself. A number of theories were placed. Here are some of them:​
1. Ants are too small to be affected by microwaves as the wave lengths of these waves are quite large.​
2. Ants contain too little water for them to be affected by the microwave.​
3. Chitin (Ants exoskeleton material) will resist microwaves.​
Microwave beams are standing wave. Such waves always remain in a constant position. So within a microwave there will be places where the energy density will be very high, whereas in others it will be very low. That is why we always have a turntable within microwave ovens in order to make sure that all parts of a meal are heated.​
Ants also have another mechanism to their advantage of microwave survival: they have one of the largest body surface areas to volume ratios. This helps it to cool down really fast, so if an ant were caught in a high-energy zone within the microwave, its body surface area advantage helps it to cool down quickly while moving to a low energy zone. So the mighty ant survives some very intense environments.​
Akash Shah
Someone has done this experiment before: Microwave Tolerance of Ants.​
Conclusion: It seems the hypothesis was disproved and ants are able to tolerate a microwave for a relatively high amount of time. One area of interest is whether an ant that is allowed to 'free roam' has a better chance of survival then an ant that stays in one spot.​
Xu Beixi
The reason has to do with the ant's small size and the wave length, which is 12.2cm. The ant is too small to capture sufficient energy to heat. If the wave length was shorter – near the length of the ant – then it would become visible to the microwaves and heat. A box of ants will heat very well and the ants would be killed.​
Robert F Schiffmann, microwave scientist
 

Comfortably Numb

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'Eggy'

That's a word I don't think I've heard since school.
How extraordinary.

Brought back to mind something I haven't thought about for eons.

Circa 10-12 years old, I was prolific in using the 'eggy' language, as were all my school mates. It actually became quite addictive and we possibly used it more than plain English.

Th-egg-anks, M-egg-ythopoeika and y-egg-ou t-egg-oo,Y-egg-ithan!

https://www.antimoon.com/forum/t5510.htm
 

Verbal Earthworm

Ephemeral Spectre
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Text

A microwave works by passing radio waves at a frequency of 2.45 gigahertz through any food. Radio waves at this frequency have an interesting property: they are absorbed by water and fats. When absorbed, the water or fat molecules start rotating due to the alternating nature of the electric fields of the microwave. This atomic motion is directly converted into energy which is given out as heat.​
Now, coming to the question itself. A number of theories were placed. Here are some of them:​
1. Ants are too small to be affected by microwaves as the wave lengths of these waves are quite large.​
2. Ants contain too little water for them to be affected by the microwave.​
3. Chitin (Ants exoskeleton material) will resist microwaves.​
Microwave beams are standing wave. Such waves always remain in a constant position. So within a microwave there will be places where the energy density will be very high, whereas in others it will be very low. That is why we always have a turntable within microwave ovens in order to make sure that all parts of a meal are heated.​
Ants also have another mechanism to their advantage of microwave survival: they have one of the largest body surface areas to volume ratios. This helps it to cool down really fast, so if an ant were caught in a high-energy zone within the microwave, its body surface area advantage helps it to cool down quickly while moving to a low energy zone. So the mighty ant survives some very intense environments.​
Akash Shah
Someone has done this experiment before: Microwave Tolerance of Ants.​
Conclusion: It seems the hypothesis was disproved and ants are able to tolerate a microwave for a relatively high amount of time. One area of interest is whether an ant that is allowed to 'free roam' has a better chance of survival then an ant that stays in one spot.​
Xu Beixi
The reason has to do with the ant's small size and the wave length, which is 12.2cm. The ant is too small to capture sufficient energy to heat. If the wave length was shorter – near the length of the ant – then it would become visible to the microwaves and heat. A box of ants will heat very well and the ants would be killed.​
Robert F Schiffmann, microwave scientist
Fanx, Mister!
 
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Inverted meanings in slang aren't new - F Scott Fitzgerald employed 'wicked' in such a way, and the OED has 'bad' for 'good' as going back to at least the late 19th century.

Oh, and 'egregious' used to mean very, very good - not very, very bad.

(The original meaning appears to be more like 'outstanding' - as in, standing out from the crowd in a positive way; for some reason, over time, this has shifted to mean outstanding, but in the opposite direction.)
 

Ogdred Weary

Fhtagntastic.
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The first three men on Earth (according to the Bible), Adam, Abel and Cain, have the same initials as the first three men who went to the Moon - Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins.
"Therefore... something, something, blah, blah, blah aliens."


giorgio1.jpg

Probably Illuminaties too.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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Whilst away this weekend, I've learned that the spring water at Tunbridge Wells is chalybeate and high in iron. A litre of the stuff would suffice a woman her RDA of the mineral element. I also learned that it tastes like rusty nails, unsurprisingly!
So it tastes like flat Irn Bru?
 

Yithian

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Lord Lucan

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As a dismissive adjective meaning shoddy, old-fashioned or cheap it dates back to the turn of the last century, thus pre-dating Disney animations.

As a noun of variable meanings (all of which suggest something bad, unpleasant, or underhanded) it pre-dates Walt Disney's birth.

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/440031/origin-of-phrase-rinky-dink
I always have associated the term with something that was amateurish, second rate, poorly organised or cheaply made.
 

oxo66

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