Something New Every Day: Random & Newly Found Facts

EnolaGaia

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Somali and Nepali. There can't be that many of those in those states.
Yes there are ...

Somalis are an ethnic group in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul (Twin Cities) urban area and makes up the largest Somali diasporas in the US. As of 2016, there were around 74,000 Somalis in Minnesota.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Somalis_in_Minneapolis–Saint_Paul

The Nebrasks Nepali connection results from Nebraska having been the #1 resettlement state for Nepalis generally, with this Nepali population being greatly augmented by a similar concentration of Nepali-speaking Bhutanese refugees (who, as an ethnic group, were getting pushed out of Bhutan starting back in the late 1990's).
 

Frideswide

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Fascinating discussion, thank you.
 

oxo66

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The mystery being why we have 'Chinese' instead of Mandarin.
'Chinese' is of course going to be shorthand for 'all Chinese languages'.
It could be difficult to get a breakdown depending on how much detail respondents typically supply.
 

Victory

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It is fairly well known that many Americans are of German origin, approx 13%).
But I am very surprised that German as a language is still widely spoken by the six or seventh generation descendants of German immigrants in nine states.
 

Yithian

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'Chinese' is of course going to be shorthand for 'all Chinese languages'.
It could be difficult to get a breakdown depending on how much detail respondents typically supply.
You're probably correct, but it seems inconsistent with their using Hmong.
 

EnolaGaia

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You're probably correct, but it seems inconsistent with their using Hmong.
The Hmong ascription for Wisconsin results from the fact there are over a quarter million ethnic Hmong / Hmong Americans in the USA. This Hmong influx began in the 1970's with a stream of refugees from Laos and Vietnam. Wisconsin has the 3rd largest Hmong population of any US state (over 49,000), but apparently it's the state in which Hmong language use (at home) is more common than use of any other language besides English and Spanish.
 

maximus otter

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A quick ‘n dirty way to test how much life is left in your AA batteries is to drop them, on their long axis, onto a hard surface.

A discharged, “flat”, battery bounces higher than a charged, useful, battery:


maximus otter
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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Timble2

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A quick ‘n dirty way to test how much life is left in your AA batteries is to drop them, on their long axis, onto a hard surface.

A discharged, “flat”, battery bounces higher than a charged, useful, battery:


maximus otter
Wouldn't you have to know how high a charged battery bounces, to determine if the flat battery bounces higher?
 

Mythopoeika

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I discovered years ago that bashing the ends of batteries together seems to temporarily revive the batteries for a short while.
I guess it's because the contents get slightly compressed or something.
Don't try that with mercury or lithium batteries, though.
 

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On the thread ‘Films that would not get made today’, I was going to say Holiday On The Buses. Then I remembered the fact that Reg Varney was the first person in Britain to use a cashpoint machine in Britain. Which is only slightly more interesting as a post.

1562707644906.jpeg
 

Analogue Boy

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On the thread ‘Films that would not get made today’, I was going to say Holiday On The Buses. Then I remembered the fact that Reg Varney was the first person in Britain to use a cashpoint machine in Britain. Which is only slightly more interesting as a post.

View attachment 18745
Look at those Dolly Birds watching him about to spend his wad.
 

maximus otter

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Look at those Dolly Birds watching him about to spend his wad.
Confessions of an Early Withdrawer.”

It’s hard to believe that l can remember a time when, in order to withdraw a tenner of walking-round money, l had to find a bank, queue up and write a cheque for it.

maximus otter
 

Yithian

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Yithian

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The odds of getting attacked and killed by a shark are 1 in 3,748,067. In a lifetime, you are more likely to die from fireworks (1 in 340,733), lightning (1 in 79,746), drowning (1 in 1,134), a car accident (1 in 84), stroke (1 in 24), or heart disease (1 in 5). There are 70 to 100 shark attacks worldwide every year, 5 to 15 result in death.

https://www.thewildlifemuseum.org/exhibits/sharks/odds-of-a-shark-attack/
 

Anonymous-50446

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The odds of getting attacked and killed by a shark are 1 in 3,748,067. In a lifetime, you are more likely to die from fireworks (1 in 340,733), lightning (1 in 79,746), drowning (1 in 1,134), a car accident (1 in 84), stroke (1 in 24), or heart disease (1 in 5). There are 70 to 100 shark attacks worldwide every year, 5 to 15 result in death.

https://www.thewildlifemuseum.org/exhibits/sharks/odds-of-a-shark-attack/
True, but only if you are in the water...the odds against a shark related death are rather better on dry land ;)
 

Mythopoeika

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True, but only if you are in the water...the odds against a shark related death are rather better on dry land ;)
Does 'Sharknado' mean anything to you?
 

Yithian

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I consume a lot of U.S. media via YouTube and while my U.S. geography is reasonable, I'm lost as soon as they start referencing areas that cross-state boundaries or don't refer to decent-sized cities. This find is great:

KCKRIdZ.jpg


Sure our U.S. Forteans can turn up an error, mind you.
 

EnolaGaia

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I consume a lot of U.S. media via YouTube and while my U.S. geography is reasonable, I'm lost as soon as they start referencing areas that cross-state boundaries or don't refer to decent-sized cities. This find is great: ...

Sure our U.S. Forteans can turn up an error, mind you.
There have been many such "cultural area maps" of the USA, and they vary in number of areas and those areas' boundaries. As such, I'd say there's no firm basis for claiming outright "errors" in any of them. I'd quibble with some of the boundaries and categories in this particular map, but then I'd probably quibble just as much with any such map you put in front of me.

For example ... I agree that metro NYC is reasonably considered a (sub-?) cultural region in and of itself. IMHO it's not the only mega-metropolitan area deserving such treatment. At the very least, I'd have added La-La-Land (LA) as being culturally distinguishable from the rest of SoCal. Fifty years ago I'd have argued for giving Chicago a similarly separate status, but it's fading as a separable entity.

Perhaps more importantly, these regional differences aren't as evident and important as they once were. During my lifetime there's been a progressive homogenization nationwide, largely resulting from mass communications and Americans' unusually high degree of geographic mobility.

The geographic locales most representative of the distinguishing factors in this and other such regional categorization schemes tend to be the backwaters. By this I mean typically disadvantaged places with little active participation in the homogenized national economy (etc.). This in turn means there's a certain degree of discernible differentiation even within particular regions (down to the level of particular metro areas) having more to do with economic class and relative mobility than geography per se.

I'd also claim there's a historical aspect in play. The most consistently evident regional hallmarks are found in the regions with the longest history of colonial and subsequent settlement (i.e., where the roots run deeper). As such, I'd claim the applicability of such maps is highest in the east and lowest in the west.
 
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