Something New Every Day: Random & Newly Found Facts

Ermintruder

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There's an oddity on this map (there may be more).

I thought initially it was a larger-scale equivalent of a so-called 'trap street' Copyrighting Cartography with Fictional Places

2019-12-01 00.17.46.png

Yes. It's a map-marked location off the West coast of Africa apparently called "Our Canoe".

Now: as I said, I did think it might've been a copyright easter-egg. But I had a vague memory of there actually BEING a place called 'Our Canoe' in terms of literal translation. And indeed there is.....and it's not a million miles away from where the words are.....just about 700miles south

Wiki says.....
2019-12-01 00.20.27.png

Senegal's name may be interpreted as meaning "Our Canoe".....but why give a random etymology, loosely-located not really near its target. Or this may be a copyright-catchthief. Or this could be a typographical error....but more-importantly: why am I writing this at 0037hrs UKL on a Sunday morning??
 

EnolaGaia

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There's an oddity on this map (there may be more). ...

Senegal's name may be interpreted as meaning "Our Canoe".....but why give a random etymology, loosely-located not really near its target. Or this may be a copyright-catchthief. Or this could be a typographical error....but more-importantly: why am I writing this at 0037hrs UKL on a Sunday morning??
I think the odd / orphaned "Our Canoe" caption is a result of sloppy map creation, because ...

(1) Its nearest demarcated African territorial area represents the Western Sahara - a disputed region claimed by Morocco. Whoever was creating this map graphic probably pasted a cursory placeholder text string offshore of this blank area, never determined whether it should appropriately be treated as part of Morocco versus a separate territory, and overlooked the persistence of the unused caption placeholder when issuing the final product.

(2) Another reason a placeholder caption may have been pasted into that location but never used would have been to enter data for the Canary Islands, which aren't represented on the map at all. This omission is odd, given that much smaller islands / island groups were represented graphically and labeled.

Either way or both ways, I think it's a vestigial bit caused by the map creator's uncertainty concerning inclusion / exclusion of nominally Spanish-controlled territories on / off Africa's northwest coast.

I have no idea why the specific text string "Our Canoe" was being used in assembling the map. Perhaps this string itself was an artifact carried over from an existing map used as the basis for this one.
 

Ermintruder

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Perhaps this string itself was an artifact carried over from an existing map used as the basis for this one.
Agreed: perhaps also we could safely-guess a preceding countries-national-names-origins-map, template-adapted almost-completely/flawfully, into becoming the above?

A sudden eureka moment: are countries (or counties) so named because the inhabitants are counted, collectively? That they are, nationomically, taken account of? Or have I just fallen down an ontological black hole?

Because something on the Internet is WRONG.
Yeah, but, no, but... incompletely-stated (as Vicky Pollard might never've said).

A keener cri de coeur might almost be to say that nearly everything on the entirenet is at least slightly wrong.

Huxley's under-cited insight, that "62,400 repetitions make one truth" is insufficiently-inciteful in our singularity of universalised misunderstanding.

A keystone in my current bedside book-piĺe:


(Apologies for the thread-drift: sorry @Yithian: Mods, please feel free to delete my rabid rant)
 
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Gloucestrian

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Something I had not previously been aware of: Quisling, the head of the collaborator Norwegian puppet government during WW2, had previously been a close associate of the great polar explorer Fridtjof Nansen. The latter had recruited Quisling into a humanitarian relief effort in the Ukraine, and some 20,000 lives may have been saved due in large part to Quisling's work. Obviously his name is now a byword for treachery but it seems a shame that the good work he did earlier in his life is comparatively forgotten.
 

EnolaGaia

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Agreed: perhaps also we could safely-guess a preceding countries-national-names-origins-map, template-adapted almost-completely/flawfully, into becoming the above?
Yes - that's one of the possible scenarios that occurred to me. A previous map focusing on nations' names rather than their populations' most common surnames would recommend itself for simple copying and editing (providing one didn't overlook any evidence of the prior map).
 

titch

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Walruses think they are lemmings. The Tasmanian devil doesn't travel on two legs in a spiral of dust. Kangaroos need to avoid rocks better.
 

GingerTabby

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Walruses think they are lemmings.
Funny you should mention that because I recently had a conversation with a colleague about walruses. He lived in Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, for a couple of years and was told by the local Inuit that they when they are out and about they would prefer to encounter a polar bear rather than a walrus. Apparently polar bears can be shooed away by a shot fired over their heads but walruses do not back down from a confrontation. Walruses will supposedly hurl themselves at their perceived enemies. Two thousand kilograms of toothy flippered marine mammal turned into a projectile doesn't bear thinking about.
 

Comfortably Numb

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GNC

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Thanks for that, but I wish I could see the same diversity of bird species in my garden. The finches have all disappeared, for example.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Apologies if this has already been posted.
Whilst I knew that Bluetooth was named after Harald Bluetooth, the 10th century Danish king, famed for his diplomatic skills in bringing warring factions together and for the spread of Christianity, I only found out today that the Bluetooth icon is made up of the two Norse runes for his initials:

PSX_20200108_120659.jpg
 

Lord Lucan

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Gummy bears contain 9 of the 10 needed amino acids needed to sustain human life:
Gelatin is a good source of protein and it contains collagen, which is one of the materials that make up cartilage and bone. There are many kinds of protein that differ in nutritional values, and they are built on different kinds of amino acids. Therefore, to fulfill our body requirements, we need to consume ten different kinds of amino acids to efficiently build all the protein values. Since gelatin is extracted from animal collagen, it meets nine out of the ten amino acids requirements that are essential to our bodies. Gelatin is unusually high in the non-essential amino acids glycine and proline (i.e., those produced by the human body), while lacking certain essential amino acids (i.e., those not produced by the human body).
Look for - What is the benefits of gelatin?
https://www.haribo.com/enAE/contact-information-service/faq.html
 

EnolaGaia

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Chainsaws were invented to help with child birth ..
... And it was invented by Scottish doctors ...
The chain saw--a Scottish invention.

Skippen M1, Kirkup J, Maxton RM, McDonald SW.

Abstract

The prototype of the chain saw familiar today in the timber industry was pioneered in the late 18th Century by two Scottish docors, John Aitken and James Jeffray, for symphysiotomy and excision of diseased bone respectively. The chain hand saw, a fine serrated link chain which cut on the concave side, was invented around 1783-1785. It was illustrated in Aitken's Principles of Midwifery or Puerperal Medicine (1785) and used by him in his dissecting room. Jeffray claimed to have conceived the idea of the chain saw independently about that time but it was 1790 before he was able to have it produced. In 1806, Jeffray published Cases of the Excision of Carious Joints by H. Park and P. F. Moreau with Observations by James Jeffray M.D.. In this communication he translated Moreau's paper of 1803. Park andMoreau described successful excision of diseased joints, particularly the knee and elbow. Jeffray explained that the chain saw would allow a smaller wound and protect the adjacent neurovascular bundle. While a heroic concept, symphysiotomy had too many complications for most obstetricians but Jeffray's ideas became accepted, especially after the development of anaesthetics. Mechanised versions of the chain saw were developed but in the later 19th Century, it was superseded in surgey by the Gigli twisted wire saw. For much of the 19th Century, however, the chain saw was a useful surgical instrument.
PMID: 15209147 DOI: 10.1177/003693300404900218

SOURCE: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15209147
 

Mythopoeika

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Yithian

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In 1795 a French hussar regiment charged across the frozen Zuiderzee (bay), and captured the Dutch fleet in a rare battle between warships and cavalry.

The French also covered the horses' hooves with fabric to muffle the sound of their approach and ensure a surprise attack

Brilliant full tale:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capture_of_the_Dutch_fleet_at_Den_Helder
 
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