Something New Every Day: Random & Newly Found Facts

Endlessly Amazed

Endlessly, you know, amazed
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About 100 people in US with my first and last name. I know one of them as she lives 20 miles away and sometimes gets my mail which is sent from an Arizona governmental agency.
 

Beresford

Ephemeral Spectre
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Just the one with my name, which means there are more in the UK than the US since I'm named after my dad.
 

Austin Popper

Emperor of Antarctica
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Five in the US for my name.

Turns out my screen name is more fictional than I had thought.

Screenshot 2021-10-06 073355.png
 

Austin Popper

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There are more people in the US with 'Popper' as a first name than as a last name. What is wrong with parents !?
I dunno. We have some neighbors who have given their children some pretty odd names. I feel badly for the kids, partly because of the abuse I got as a child for having an unusual first name. My parents say they got a lot of trouble from their families for naming me that, even though it wasn't unheard of. Just out of fashion in the 50s. It's actually pretty common nowadays. I was named after one of my father's best friends when he was in his early teens. I never did meet that guy. Maybe children are more tolerant now, but it seems like someone named Patchouli or Armada is in for a rough time.
 

Nosmo King

I'm not a cat
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I dunno. We have some neighbors who have given their children some pretty odd names. I feel badly for the kids, partly because of the abuse I got as a child for having an unusual first name. My parents say they got a lot of trouble from their families for naming me that, even though it wasn't unheard of. Just out of fashion in the 50s. It's actually pretty common nowadays. I was named after one of my father's best friends when he was in his early teens. I never did meet that guy. Maybe children are more tolerant now, but it seems like someone named Patchouli or Armada is in for a rough time.
I knew someone who called their kid 'Nutty'
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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There is a new thing called "sealioning":

Sealioning (also spelled sea-lioning and sea lioning) is a type of trolling or harassment that consists of pursuing people with persistent requests for evidence or repeated questions, while maintaining a pretense of civility and sincerity. It may take the form of "incessant, bad-faith invitations to engage in debate".

maximus otter
 

WeeScottishLassie

Justified & Ancient
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There is a new thing called "sealioning":

Sealioning (also spelled sea-lioning and sea lioning) is a type of trolling or harassment that consists of pursuing people with persistent requests for evidence or repeated questions, while maintaining a pretense of civility and sincerity. It may take the form of "incessant, bad-faith invitations to engage in debate".

maximus otter
I was beginning to read that as a new term for people who were actually harassing sea-lions!!
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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There is a new thing called "sealioning":

Sealioning (also spelled sea-lioning and sea lioning) is a type of trolling or harassment that consists of pursuing people with persistent requests for evidence or repeated questions, while maintaining a pretense of civility and sincerity. It may take the form of "incessant, bad-faith invitations to engage in debate".

maximus otter
I've never heard of that term before, although I have seen it deployed quite a bit by people who don't like to hear the truth about something.
 

Austin Popper

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I knew someone who called their kid 'Nutty'
One of my sisters said to her kids in a grocery store, "Come on ya little varmints!" They were probably six and eight. A nearby shopper was horrified, and lit into Sis. "Do you know what you just called your children?" She replied that she did know exactly what she called them, adding "I am an English teacher."
 

Bigphoot2

Not sprouts! I hate sprouts.
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I looked up how many people were called Ronald MacDonald in the US and surprised it was only 207, I thought there would be more originally from the Clan McDonald, but that's spelt differently. There are 25 American with my name (not Bad Bungle), just learnt something new.

http://howmanyofme.com/search/
Only 2 people in the US with my name.
 

Kryptonite

Vague Apparition
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There are 3,965,586 people in the US with my first name, but only 442 with my surname, and 5 others of me.
 

Iris

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There are only 25 in the US with my name and surname and only 2 with the same middle initial.
 

MercuryCrest

The Severed Head of a Great Old One.
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There are 2 other people in the US with both my first and last name. Sadly, I already knew this, as I had gone online many years ago to make sure a minor ticket was off my record and before I used my middle initial I saw things that would make a hooker blush.

It was only a few years ago that one of them started a concrete business and I got stuck with the bill (until I spoke with the company owner).

Yeah, my first and last name combination "sounds" unique, but it's shared by two people with really bad back stories....
 

ChasFink

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I have a very common first name and a relatively unusual surname, spelled in an uncommon way. My wife's names are both somewhat common, and her given name is used for men as well. I was surprised to find that there are 13 of me and only 11 of her. We both have heard of at least one person with our name.
 

cycleboy2

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Nasa has a... Planetary Protection Officer!

Her role is to guard the entire universe from human contamination – protecting “all the planets, all the time”, as international planetary protection policy puts it. Her job is “the impossible art of modelling risk when your data is nonexistent but the stakes are existential”.

And related to this: One grim quarantine detail to emerge from the original Apollo 11 mission to the moon is that, if the astronauts had returned contaminated with an alien contagion, the plan was to bury them alive under a mountain of concrete.

Yowza!

These are from an absolutely fascinating article in the Guardian on humanity's attempts to keep free from infection.

https://www.theguardian.com/artandd...n-safe-review-quarantine-ideas-covid-lockdown
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Just watching a great QI.
Never knew that the word blanket comes from the surname of a medieval merchant in Bristol called Edmund Blanket (or possibly Blanquette).
Also the chocolate, nuts and cream purée praline was invented by a monsieur Lasagne.
 

maximus otter

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Just found out that Hedy Lamarr, star of Blazing Saddles…

Hedley Lamarr was the fictional corrupt male Attorney General in Blazing Saddles, whose name was a play on that of Hedy Lamarr, real-life glamorous actress and radio boffin.

Wow! Two Blazing Saddles-related posts within minutes!

maximus otter
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Having watched the T20 World Cup cricket match between Bangladesh and Papua New Guinea last night, I did a little Googling about the latter.

Papua New Guinea (aka PNG) has only around 8.9 million inhabitants and yet has more languages than any other country on Earth.
Whilst English is the language of government and education, some 820 native languages represent a staggering 12% of the world's total extant languages.
Seashells were the common currency on PNG until 1933.

And, whilst I couldn't identify anything resembling a tune in the Bangladeshi national anthem, the PNG one "O Arise All You Sons" is a cracking ballad with almost Piaf-esque torch-song overtones:

 
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