Something New Every Day: Random & Newly Found Facts

uair01

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 12, 2005
Messages
3,674
Reaction score
5,850
Points
239
Location
Rotterdam
Random find from the Washington Post:

A common ingredient in potting mixes is perlite, which makes the
soils airier while also retaining moisture. In its final form, small
white pellets, it appears to be something synthesized in a factory. In
fact, it comes from a volcanic sand mined on the Greek island of Milos.
Shipped to the United States, the ore is heated to 1,400 degrees
Fahrenheit, at which point it pops into kernels.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
1,663
Reaction score
2,495
Points
154
Location
Earth
A lady in Illinois who must have a lot of time an money is suing strawberry Kelloggs Pop-Tarts for 5 million dollars.

The box claims that the pop-tart has 2% strawberries.

This lady claims that we have been fooled because the filling is strawberry flavored pears and apples.

Has Kellogg lied to us over strawberries ?

What is this world coming too ?
 

ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
1,433
Reaction score
3,796
Points
164
The silly theme song to The Blob was written by Burt Bacharach and Mack David (Hal David's brother).
 

Ascalon

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
582
Reaction score
1,509
Points
154
I was today years old when I discovered the concept of the uncanny valley.

To quote:
"The uncanny valley is a concept first introduced in the 1970s by Masahiro Mori, then a professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Mori coined the term “uncanny valley" to describe his observation that as robots appear more humanlike, they become more appealing—but only up to a certain point. Upon reaching the uncanny valley, our affinity descends into a feeling of strangeness, a sense of unease, and a tendency to be scared or freaked out. "

However, my wonder was somewhat tainted by the tweet that had prompted my search for a definition:
 

Fluttermoth

Cult of Jari
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Messages
1,111
Reaction score
1,513
Points
174
I was going to post this in Coincidences, but I think it's better here.

I clicked on Twitter after reading Ascalon's post, and my home page looked like this;
 

Attachments

  • Uncannyvalleycoincidence.jpg
    Uncannyvalleycoincidence.jpg
    554.9 KB · Views: 12

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
9,516
Reaction score
22,029
Points
334
A lady in Illinois who must have a lot of time an money is suing strawberry Kelloggs Pop-Tarts for 5 million dollars.

The box claims that the pop-tart has 2% strawberries.

This lady claims that we have been fooled because the filling is strawberry flavored pears and apples.

Has Kellogg lied to us over strawberries ?

What is this world coming too ?

Seen on a blog I read:

Pop-tort-Fortean-01.jpg


(Explanatory note: tort)

maximus otter
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
36,899
Reaction score
53,711
Points
334
Location
HM The Tower of London
I was today years old when I discovered the concept of the uncanny valley.

To quote:
"The uncanny valley is a concept first introduced in the 1970s by Masahiro Mori, then a professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Mori coined the term “uncanny valley" to describe his observation that as robots appear more humanlike, they become more appealing—but only up to a certain point. Upon reaching the uncanny valley, our affinity descends into a feeling of strangeness, a sense of unease, and a tendency to be scared or freaked out. "

However, my wonder was somewhat tainted by the tweet that had prompted my search for a definition:
It's cognitive dissonance. Your senses tell you it's human, or nearly so, while your rational brain says it's a machine.

I don't get the uncanny valley experience. Things that are machines and not human are always machines and not human.

Like how actors are always actors and are not really in love or in any danger or whatever. That's my neurodivergent rationality at work. :)
 

Iris

Justified & Ancient
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
2,356
Reaction score
4,341
Points
189
One of the health emails I get said today that pineapple or apple cider vinegar are helpful if you have gout.
 

Ascalon

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
582
Reaction score
1,509
Points
154
On Halloween night, I discovered that a Nissan Leaf has a regular 12v battery, just like other cars and it can go flat. It can be jump-started, even when the main drive batteries are almost full.

It was a curious experience indeed to jump an EV from a diesel-powered dinosaur juice burner. :)
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
1,663
Reaction score
2,495
Points
154
Location
Earth
Fluorine is in your teeth and bones and is abundant on the earth trapped in fluorspar.

Up until now fluorine has never been detected in the universe outside of earth.

Now a discovered galaxy NGP-190387 which is 12 billion light years from here contains hydrogen fluoride.

Your fluoride toothpaste is uniquely more rare then you think it is.
 

ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
1,433
Reaction score
3,796
Points
164
Up until now fluorine has never been detected in the universe outside of earth.

Now a discovered galaxy NGP-190387 which is 12 billion light years from here contains hydrogen fluoride.
Do you think the hydrogen fluoride in NGP-190387 will last another 12 billion years?

But seriously - Wikipedia says fluorine is the 24th most abundant element in the Universe. That's rare for such a light element, but implies it has been detected in lots of places. Where did you get the information that it is rarer than that?
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
1,663
Reaction score
2,495
Points
154
Location
Earth
Chas, I can not find the internet article but my article’s view was fluorine was a rarity in the universe except for earth.

We need Sagan to straighten this out.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
25,300
Reaction score
38,936
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
But seriously - Wikipedia says fluorine is the 24th most abundant element in the Universe. That's rare for such a light element, but implies it has been detected in lots of places. Where did you get the information that it is rarer than that?

Fluorine is a relatively light element, its production by stars has always been something of a chemical mystery, and its high reactivity means that there isn't a lot of it in free form to detect.
At 400 ppb, fluorine is estimated to be the 24th most common element in the universe. It is comparably rare for a light element (elements tend to be more common the lighter they are). All of the elements from atomic number 6 (carbon) to atomic number 14 (silicon) are hundreds or thousands of times more common than fluorine except for 11 (sodium). ... Fluorine is so rare because it is not a product of the usual nuclear fusion processes in stars. And any created fluorine within stars is rapidly eliminated through strong nuclear fusion reactions—either with hydrogen to form oxygen and helium, or with helium to make neon and hydrogen. The presence of fluorine at all—outside of temporary existence in stars—is somewhat of a mystery because of the need to escape these fluorine-destroying reactions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_and_occurrence_of_fluorine
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
1,663
Reaction score
2,495
Points
154
Location
Earth
EnolaGaia is right, it seems to be too reactive to remain free.

That is why finding hydrogen fluoride seems to be unusual in this galaxy.
 

Austin Popper

Emperor of Antarctica
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
1,296
Reaction score
2,979
Points
159
Location
Colorado, where the gold is still elusive
On Halloween night, I discovered that a Nissan Leaf has a regular 12v battery, just like other cars and it can go flat. It can be jump-started, even when the main drive batteries are almost full.

It was a curious experience indeed to jump an EV from a diesel-powered dinosaur juice burner. :)
I didn't know that about Leafs (Leaves? :thought:) but our Volt has a regular car battery too. I've read that it's for normal car systems like air bags, computers, lights, radios, and such. The drive battery pack is well over 300 volts, I think. Anyway, Volts have gasoline engines too, and I thought that was the reason for the 12 volt battery when we first got the car.
 

Iris

Justified & Ancient
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
2,356
Reaction score
4,341
Points
189
Yes I was told about cherries as well but I thought someone might be interested in something else.
 

Floyd1

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
1,648
Reaction score
3,789
Points
159
One of the health emails I get said today that pineapple or apple cider vinegar are helpful if you have gout.
Apple cider vinegar seems to have become a cure-all for everything these days.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,734
Reaction score
31,656
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Yes I was told about cherries as well but I thought someone might be interested in something else.

Thanks! I might try that as well dashed on before things cook, don't like vinegar that much. Taking cherries and ground cinnamon at the moment.
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
36,899
Reaction score
53,711
Points
334
Location
HM The Tower of London
Thanks! I might try that as well dashed on before things cook, don't like vinegar that much. Taking cherries and ground cinnamon at the moment.
You don't have to swig the vinegar neat. A tablespoon in a glass of water is the recommended dose. I used to have it for some imaginary ailment or other. As I drink a lot of water I hardly noticed the taste.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,734
Reaction score
31,656
Points
314
Location
Eblana
You don't have to swig the vinegar neat. A tablespoon in a glass of water is the recommended dose. I used to have it for some imaginary ailment or other. As I drink a lot of water I hardly noticed the taste.

Heh, heh! I wasn't thinking you had to swig it! TBH I don't like vinegar on fish & chips.
 

ChasFink

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
1,433
Reaction score
3,796
Points
164
For a period of about two months in 1943, sliced bread was illegal in the U.S.

Because it required thicker waxed paper than whole loaves to keep it fresh, it was thought that sliced bread was wasteful of wartime supplies. (There was also a concern that the cost of slicing machines drove up the price of bread, but how banning the use of machines that were already purchased would remedy that, I don't know.)

The ban was ostensibly lifted because the waste and cost were not as big as expected, but many feel public outcry was the real reason.

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/569606/time-us-government-banned-sliced-bread
 

Austin Popper

Emperor of Antarctica
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
1,296
Reaction score
2,979
Points
159
Location
Colorado, where the gold is still elusive
The History Guy did a good spot about that. I had never heard of it, but had heard of quite a few wartime regulations my family had experienced. Dad told me that game wardens could give a driver a speeding ticket, for wasting fuel. He doesn't like peanut butter very much, having eaten a ton of it back then. He said it was amazingly cheap and easy to get. All sorts of other food was either strictly rationed or very scarce and expensive.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
47,138
Reaction score
42,769
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
The History Guy did a good spot about that. I had never heard of it, but had heard of quite a few wartime regulations my family had experienced. Dad told me that game wardens could give a driver a speeding ticket, for wasting fuel. He doesn't like peanut butter very much, having eaten a ton of it back then. He said it was amazingly cheap and easy to get. All sorts of other food was either strictly rationed or very scarce and expensive.
Peanut butter is one of those foods that keeps forever, so the US government has a stash of it somewhere.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
9,516
Reaction score
22,029
Points
334
A recording exists of the last minute of World War One.

Sound as such wasn’t recorded at the Front, but to enable the Allies to estimate the range and direction of German artillery, waves of sound pressure were recorded onto photographic film. This is similar to the process we use today to record seismic activity onto paper strips.

A UK firm has taken the recording from the actual time of the Armistice, and added the sounds of the gunfire represented on the film:


Even on this very last morning of the War, with all sides aware of the impending Armistice, 2,738 men were killed.

maximus otter
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
47,138
Reaction score
42,769
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Who knew this? Breathing potatoes can get you killed.


My Dad warned me about eating green or discoloured potatoes, but I never knew they gave off a poisonous gas.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
1,663
Reaction score
2,495
Points
154
Location
Earth
The European Heart Journal studied 88,000 people for six years.

One should fall asleep between 10 to 11 PM. at night

If you fall asleep before or after that time, you have a 25% increase in chance of having a heart attack.
 
Top