Star Trek

Stormkhan

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Well, I've been binge-watching ST:LD ... which says a lot.
Yeah, the humour is "a personal thing" (i.e. I find it quite funny but not outrageously so), but I honestly prefer this to Picard or Beyond. Perhaps, even in a cartoon humour way, it feels more like the episodic adventure format that ST:ToS or ST:NG had. It has it's (brief) moments but it isn't as dark or universe-impacting storyline as the others.
In fact, it highlights the entertainment or adventure that exists for 99% of "ordinary" people in the world, now or in the future.
I think it was in ep.2 or 3 of Picard when he stomps into an Admirals office, stating he was coming out of retirement and demanding a ship and crew. It was a really emotional and pithy moment when he's told in no uncertain terms that, regardless of his past glory, he has NO right or ability to dictate terms to the Federation or Star Fleet. The world isn't about him but his part in the world.
Lower Decks uses humour to point this out: it's one thing to have heroes but what about those who the heroes use - need - just to maintain the world around them? ST:NG had the episode ... er ... "Lower Decks" that portrayed this well. So, too, did Babylon 5 (I can't find the particular episode at the moment).
 

ChasFink

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I just had a "wait a minute..." moment 50 years in the making. In "City on the Edge of Forever" Kirk comes home from shopping: "I've brought you some assorted vegetables, baloney and a hard roll for myself, and I've spent the other nine tenths of our combined salaries for the last three days on filling this order for you. Mr. Spock, this bag does not contain platinum, silver or gold, nor is it likely to in the near future."

But they were working in a soup kitchen. Why would he spend any of that money on food instead of the much- needed electronics, if they can eat for free?
 

GNC

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I just had a "wait a minute..." moment 50 years in the making. In "City on the Edge of Forever" Kirk comes home from shopping: "I've brought you some assorted vegetables, baloney and a hard roll for myself, and I've spent the other nine tenths of our combined salaries for the last three days on filling this order for you. Mr. Spock, this bag does not contain platinum, silver or gold, nor is it likely to in the near future."

But they were working in a soup kitchen. Why would he spend any of that money on food instead of the much- needed electronics, if they can eat for free?
Isn't it bad form to help yourself to the soup kitchen's soup when you work there yourself?
 

ChasFink

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Isn't it bad form to help yourself to the soup kitchen's soup when you work there yourself?
They were clearly in need themselves, and I think it was accepted they would eat there.
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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I always wondered if Bill Shatner and Joan Collins got jiggy during the making of that episode.
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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Oh I really do miss Clive James so much, he was a clever and witty fellow.
One of the channels on the tellybox showed his 'postcards from' series recently, and he just managed to effortlessly bumble along, absolutely charming.
What a loss.
 

GNC

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Oh I really do miss Clive James so much, he was a clever and witty fellow.
One of the channels on the tellybox showed his 'postcards from' series recently, and he just managed to effortlessly bumble along, absolutely charming.
What a loss.
I watched those too, he was great.
 

stu neville

Commissioner.
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His books are dazzling, too. Certainly my favourite nonfiction author by a long way, and he was a rare poet and gifted critic.
 

GNC

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Well that settles that. But since she now totally misunderstands the character she played, maybe she's not so clear on the rest of it, either.
Joan was married to Anthony Newley at the time she made the episode, and trying to make that marriage work despite his terrible philandering.
 

Xanatic*

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There is another animated show on the way: Star Trek Prodigy.
A bunch of alien kids find a Starfleet vessel, and end up travelling the galaxy with Janeway.
 

Analogue Boy

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His books are dazzling, too. Certainly my favourite nonfiction author by a long way, and he was a rare poet and gifted critic.
I fell apart at Clive James as a TV critic. I particularly liked his collected articles collated into ’The Crystal Bucket’. I totally lost it on his review of The World Disco Dancing Championship’.

As the floor pulsed with light and the air shook to the sledgehammer beat, one dancer after another gallantly attempted the impossible task of shaking off his own pudenda without touching them.
https://archive.clivejames.com/books/frankie.htm

I read Clive’s ‘Falling Towards England’ and was working in Covent Garden at the time. They asked me where I’d like to go to eat and I said ‘I’m not fussy’ so they said ‘Right. Jimmy the Greeks it is’.
That Soho restaurant meal more than lived up to the legend Clive James described and I could probably do a whole article on it, such is the vivid lasting memory.
 
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