Staying Strong In COVID-19 Conditions (Tips; Suggestions; Advice)

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13 lockdown cooking projects and the science of how they work

Source: newscientist.com
Date: 19 May, 2020

During this spell of enforced confinement, many of us have found a renewed enthusiasm for cooking and baking. Recipes that normally seem too time-consuming now feel like a thoroughly relaxing way to pass the time, and making yourself delicious things to eat is an easy way to bring joy in a period when we are deprived of many of the things we look forward to.

If you’re looking for ideas for fun kitchen projects to amuse yourself during lockdown, here are a few suggestions.

The articles come from our Science of Cooking series, which provides instructions for making tasty treats and explains the theory behind the recipes. We hope you enjoy giving them a try.

[...]

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...ng-projects-and-the-science-of-how-they-work/
 

EnolaGaia

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An immunologist offers 7 factors he considers in deciding whether it's safe to venture out during the pandemic conditions ...
US Doctor Shares 7 Things He Reviews When Deciding When And Where It's Safe to Go Out

As we return to some degree of normalcy after weeks of social distancing, we all need a plan. As an immunologist, I've given this a lot of thought personally and professionally. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/doctor...ould-consider-before-safely-leaving-the-house
 

Ermintruder

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Here are some tips for dealing with fogged lenses when wearing a mask with eyeglasses
My earlier forum responses in-thread to this challenge might've sat better here, but I'm puzzled by the caveats mentioned in that external tips-list, namely, that specialist anti-scratch /anti-glare etc coatings will prevent the effective application of aftermarket DIY anti-fogging / 'anti-dim' treatments.....

Those already-added costly coatings paid for on eyeglasses/spectacles are applied to the outer convex surface of the lenses: my (and others') anti-dim fog-fix is being applied to the inner concave opposite side of the lens (as in heads vs tails).

So why's the professional coating being cited as a probable nullifier for this interventional approach? <puzzled>
 

EnolaGaia

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This 103 year old COVID-19 survivor might well serve as a model for anyone wanting to know how to "stay strong."
103-year-old woman celebrates beating Covid-19 with a cold beer

A 103-year-old Massachusetts woman who recovered from Covid-19 celebrated with a favorite drink -- a cold beer, her family told CNN.

When Jennie Stejna tested positive for coronavirus in late April, her family began preparing for the worst, granddaughter Shelley Gunn said.

At one point, her family was told that Stejna had stopped eating and drinking and might not make it through the night. They called her for one last goodbye, Gunn said.

When Gunn's husband, a Navy retiree, asked Stejna if she was ready to pass away, she responded "Hell yeah," according to the family.

"She's always been a feisty woman," Gunn said.

But instead of a grim phone call from Stejna's nursing home, on May 8 they received the news that she had tested negative, and was symptom-free, the family said.

"The nurses came into her room, and she said, "I'm not sick anymore, Get the hell out,'" Gunn said. ...
FULL STORY (With Photo of Her Celebrating): https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/31/us/covid-19-grandma-beer-trnd/index.html
 

Min Bannister

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Something I have been thinking about for a while but only got round to properly after lockdown was eating more unpopular foods. By which I mean things like rice pudding which have gone out of fashion and most of us only remember as something horrible they used to torture us with at school. I made some up in my slow cooker. It was lovely hot or cold and the extra portions keep in the fridge for a few days. It is a brilliant pudding as it is not too calorific (well it can depend what you add to it and if you make it with cream) and is pretty nutritious too.

Right now I am eating semolina pudding after looking it up on the internet and discovering that semolina is pretty much a superfood with loads of vitamins and fibre. I can see it becoming a solution to my what-to-eat-after-running problem when club runs start up again and I don't get in till too late to really eat properly but hungry. I am slightly gluten-intolerant though so I will have to gauge the effect later on too...
 

Lb8535

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Something I have been thinking about for a while but only got round to properly after lockdown was eating more unpopular foods. By which I mean things like rice pudding which have gone out of fashion and most of us only remember as something horrible they used to torture us with at school. I made some up in my slow cooker. It was lovely hot or cold and the extra portions keep in the fridge for a few days. It is a brilliant pudding as it is not too calorific (well it can depend what you add to it and if you make it with cream) and is pretty nutritious too.

Right now I am eating semolina pudding after looking it up on the internet and discovering that semolina is pretty much a superfood with loads of vitamins and fibre. I can see it becoming a solution to my what-to-eat-after-running problem when club runs start up again and I don't get in till too late to really eat properly but hungry. I am slightly gluten-intolerant though so I will have to gauge the effect later on too...
I love rice pudding and I've been looking for a decent and simple slow cooker recipe. Would you kindly share by message? Thx.
 

Min Bannister

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I love rice pudding and I've been looking for a decent and simple slow cooker recipe. Would you kindly share by message? Thx.
I'll happily share it here although it wasn't all that simple in terms on ingredients! For four servings.

50g pudding rice
550ml milk
25g raisens
25g ground almonds
25g sugar
1tsp mixed spice
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves
Seeds from 4 cardamom pods.

Stick it all in the pot on low for 5-8 hours depending on whether you like the skin or not.
 

Lb8535

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I'll happily share it here although it wasn't all that simple in terms on ingredients! For four servings.

50g pudding rice
550ml milk
25g raisens
25g ground almonds
25g sugar
1tsp mixed spice
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves
Seeds from 4 cardamom pods.

Stick it all in the pot on low for 5-8 hours depending on whether you like the skin or not.
Thanks. I can omit some of these ingredients and still end up with rice pudding. We don't have pudding rice here - we well I generally use leftovers. Is pudding rice just plain white rice?
 

Min Bannister

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Thanks. I can omit some of these ingredients and still end up with rice pudding. We don't have pudding rice here - we well I generally use leftovers. Is pudding rice just plain white rice?
Yes, I am sure it will still be nice. Pudding rice is different to plain white rice as it has a shorter grain. It sort of melts away in the cooker. Normal rice would keep its shape and you'd get more of a sort of milky spiced rice dish.
 

AnonyJoolz

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Having a nice cup of tea and a sit-down.
Thanks. I can omit some of these ingredients and still end up with rice pudding. We don't have pudding rice here - we well I generally use leftovers. Is pudding rice just plain white rice?
Pudding rice is short grain (sticky) rice, similar to arborio or Japanese sticky rice :)
 

JamesWhitehead

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something horrible they used to torture us with at school
School had its milk puddings, I think. Ground-rice was common, though crowned with a constitutional prune! Tapioca - frog-spawn - was universally hated. I took to packed lunches.

Yet home was not safe from milk puddings. Far from it! My father's ulcer dictated the blandness of the whole family's diet, so we got rice pudding several times a week. This had none of the interesting additions mentioned above. A bit of the browned skin was the best you could hope for. It was best when condensed to a sweet, golden table-spoonful, after long cooking.

In retrospect, it was wholesome and - if we did not eat it - there was no option of snacking on other stuff! :hunger:
 

Yithian

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Pudding rice is short grain (sticky) rice, similar to arborio or Japanese sticky rice :)
Interestingly, Koreans sometimes colloquially refer to non-sticky rice as 'flying rice'.

I personally really like some or the old-fashioned dishes here that substitute barley for rice. They're filling and have a good texture when served with sesame oil and hot sauces, but some older Koreans claim it reminds them of the lean years during and in the wake of the Korean War.
 

Min Bannister

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frog-spawn
Yes, I have my limits and do not plan to look up tapioca recipes! I believe trendy Londoners put it in their tea.

I personally really like some or the old-fashioned dishes here that substitute barley for rice--they're filling and have a good texture when served with sesame oil and hot sauces--but some older Koreans claim it reminds them of the lean years during and in the wake of the Korean War.
Barley is great stuff. Here quinoa has been all the rage for a while and it often turns up in recipies I read in magazines. You can substitute in barley. It is a fraction of the price, has a nice nutty flavour, is also nutritious and better still, grows in Scotland. :twothumbs:
 

AlchoPwn

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Lots and lots of butterbean and tomato soup. I'm fed up of it already and I haven't even made any yet.
Hint: There are other sorts of soup that store just as well.
 

Kondoru

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Tapioca is great stuff.

Even thogh the texture is a bit...slimy.
 
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