Stephen King

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James_H

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I posted this on another thread but it might be fitting here: I thought IT chapter two was terrible.
 

GNC

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Gawd, I hope not, apart from Tim Curry the TV version was a real dud for me. I did love IT Chapter One, though, and I suppose I'll watch Chapter Two, but my enthusiasm is waning after hearing the reviews.
 
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In The Tall Grass: Based on a novella written by Stephen King and Joe Hill. The tale of a field of long grass which entices people in, trapping them in time loops and time slips. Next to the field is an abandoned church with cars parked around it. The grass itself may be sentient or it might just be manipulated by the Black Rock which is within the field. This ancient rock has has ancient pictographs carved on it. The stone can control the humans trapped within the endless meadow if they touch it. A real sense of existential terror is generated by director Vincenzo Natali who also wrote the screenplay. The film does perhaps overstay it's welcome and would benefit from a 15 minute cut in the 101 minute running time. Still, it is an entertaining horror film in the best King tradition. 7/10. On Netflix.
 
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blessmycottonsocks

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In The Tall Grass: Based on a novella written by Stephen King and Joe Hill. The tale of a field of long grass which entices people in, trapping them in time loops and time slips. Next to the field is an abandoned church with cars parked around it. The grass itself may be sentient or it might just be manipulated by the Black Rock which is within the field. This ancient rock has has ancient pictographs carved on it. The stone can control the humans trapped within the endless meadow if they touch it. A real sense of existential terror is generated by director Vincenzo Natali who also wrote the screenplay. The film does perhaps overstay it's welcome and would benefit from a 15 minute cut in the 101 minute running time. Still, it is an entertaining horror film in the best King tradition. 7/10. On Netflix.
Watched it last month.
Started out as fairly intriguing but, like many SK ideas, it's a very slim premise stretched out far too long.
 

GNC

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Another remake as The Dark Half will be remade by Alex Ross Perry:
Dark Half news

They're wondering at the link whether this will be another collaboration with Elisabeth Moss. I suppose their Queen of Earth could be quite Dark-Half-ish. I'm one of the few who didn't mind the very faithful (too faithful?) Romero version.

They also wonder if Rose Madder might not be a better fit for Perry, which is a good point - plus it has the bonus of not being adapted before.
 
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Pet Sematry: Just watched the 1989 version again, doesn't have as much of a Folk Horror feel as the 2019 film but holds up well. Church the cat is more frightening and the student with his brains hanging out is more convincing as a messenger/guide. Rachel's sister is less terrifying in this version but given her illness the restraint is probably just as well. Differs significantly from the 2019 production in narrative development and outcome. Director Mary Lambert delivered a pretty good shocker. 8/10.
 

escargot

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Pet Sematry: Just watched the 1989 version again, doesn't have as much of a Folk Horror feel as the 2019 film but holds up well. Church the cat is more frightening and the student with his brains hanging out is more convincing as a messenger/guide. Rachel's sister is less terrifying in this version but given her illness the restraint is probably just as well. Differs significantly from the 2019 production in narrative development and outcome. Director Mary Lambert delivered a pretty good shocker. 8/10.
Agreed. We watched a bit of that last night but as usual I couldn't get past shouting at the telly when the family turn up at the new house - 'Don't stay there!' 'The road's too dangerous, you have children and a CAT!' 'At least build a FENCE!'
 
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Pet Sematry II (1992): On Syfy. Some truly horrific scenes, electrocution, throat torn out by a dog, if you like rabbits you'll be nauseated. A dog is buried in the old Indian Cemetery, returns and is feral, attacking people, crashing through windows. Then the man it kills is also buried in the old cemetery and comes back, not normal but is able to function, fools those who want to be fooled. In spite of the horror this sequel doesn't have the same sense of foreboding and incipient threat the original had and the acting is generally below par. Directed by Mary Lambert, written by Richard Outten, this is just about watchable. 5.5/10.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Just finished his novel "Elevation" on the train home last night.
Like much of his material, it's a scanty premise for a short story which, whilst well-written as always and initially compelling, leaves the reader feeling short-changed at the end.
 

escargot

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Pet Sematry: Just watched the 1989 version again, doesn't have as much of a Folk Horror feel as the 2019 film but holds up well. Church the cat is more frightening and the student with his brains hanging out is more convincing as a messenger/guide. Rachel's sister is less terrifying in this version but given her illness the restraint is probably just as well. Differs significantly from the 2019 production in narrative development and outcome. Director Mary Lambert delivered a pretty good shocker. 8/10.
King can be a genius sometimes. In the book, someone tries but narrowly fails to save someone's life and instead sees them die. The would-be rescuer relives the terrible incident in dreams and flashbacks. This is classic PTSD, which King describes perfectly without naming.

(A character in Salem's Lot also has signs of PTSD after losing his wife in a motorcycle accident. He keeps picturing her boot lying in the road afterwards.)

Years ago I worked with a woman who, when we got chatting, spontaneously told me she'd once seen someone die in the same circumstances. (This was after I'd read the book but we weren't discussing it.)
The victim was a toddler, of a similar age to victim in the book. The woman had only seen what was going to happen at the last minute, and couldn't save him. She was still getting the dreams and flashbacks after I think about 2/3 years.

I told her, 'That's PTSD. You MUST see your doctor. You're not going mad, it's a natural reaction, but you can't go on like this. Get some help.'

One of King's major themes is the longterm mental effects of physical and emotional harm done to children. Writers can be prophets.
 
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Monstrosa

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King can be a genius sometimes. In the book, someone tries but narrowly fails to save someone's life and instead sees them die. The would-be rescuer relives the terrible incident in dreams and flashbacks. This is classic PTSD, which King describes perfectly without naming.

(A character in Salem's Lot also has signs of PTSD after losing his wife in a motorcycle accident. He keeps picturing her boot lying in the road afterwards.)

Years ago I worked with a woman who, when we got chatting, spontaneously told me she'd once seen someone die in the same circumstances. (This was after I'd read the book but we weren't discussing it.)
The victim was a toddler, of a similar age to victim in the book. The woman had only seen what was going to happen at the last minute, and couldn't save him. She was still getting the dreams and flashbacks after I think about 2/3 years.

I told her, 'That's PTSD. You MUST see your doctor. You're not going mad, it's a natural reaction, but you can't go on like this. Get some help.'

One of King's major themes is the longterm mental effects of physical and emotional harm done to children. Writers can be prophets.
King in "Danse Macabre" tells the tale that when he was young he saw a friend killed in an accident.
 

maximus otter

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(A character in Salem's Lot also has signs of PTSD after losing his wife in a motorcycle accident. He keeps picturing her boot lying in the road afterwards.)
l’m 99.9% sure that he reuses that idea in Pet Sematary, where he recalls his dead kid’s shoe lying in the carriageway, full of blood.

maximus otter
 

GNC

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I seem to remember King has no memory of seeing his friend dying, though he worked out he must have and he was shaken afterwards, so a more perfect PTSD cannot be imagined.
 

GNC

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King has a certain reputation for recycling his (and other people's) ideas.
His recent novella "Elevation" is a near-reworking of "Thinner" for example.
He rationalised this (in his intro to Children of the Corn variation You Know They Got a Hell of a Band) that if you go to see The Rolling Stones, you want them to play the hits.
 
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