Stonehenge

JamesWhitehead

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. . . they come over here with their big, red cheeses and their brown cafés, no one wants to come to Henge anymore. We might as well lay down and die . . . :mad:
 

rynner2

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I wonder if they were also distilling Geneva at that time! It might have overwhelmed the mead or whatever the 'stone age Brits' were drinking up to then! :D
 

Tribble

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I wonder if they were also distilling Geneva at that time! It might have overwhelmed the mead or whatever the 'stone age Brits' were drinking up to then! :D
They brought their happy brownies and cigarettes with them. Turned it into Stonedhenge.
 

gerhard1

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If I could, there is a question I have about Stonehenge, or more specifically, the area around it. I was looking on Google Earth and noticed two circles in the field to the south of it. One was about 500 feet to the ESE of the main structure and the other was about 1000 feet to the SW.

What are these circles? Are they related to the Great Curcus Barrows to the NW of the main structure?
 

gerhard1

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Thank you. That was what I was thinking as well. Barrows or something similar.
 

rynner2

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The definitive mapping for the UK comes from the Ordnance Survey (originally a branch of the army). They produce maps in various scales, and sometimes specialise in historical sites.

Much of their output is available in the UK via Bing Maps, but I don't know if the same applies in the US.

Try https://www.bing.com/maps?FORM=Z9LH3
 

gerhard1

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The definitive mapping for the UK comes from the Ordnance Survey (originally a branch of the army). They produce maps in various scales, and sometimes specialise in historical sites.

Much of their output is available in the UK via Bing Maps, but I don't know if the same applies in the US.

Try https://www.bing.com/maps?FORM=Z9LH3
They have some fantastic maps online, including bing and google. As an aside, didn't the Ordnance Survey also do maps of many British overseas territories?
 

eburacum

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There are quite a few of these around Stonehenge. To the South, there is even a whole line of them.
Barrows, I'd guess. One is even labelled 'Bush Barrow'.
Bush Barrow is amazing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_Barrow
Two of the bronze daggers have the largest blades of any from their period, whilst a third had a 30 centimetres (12 in) long wooden hilt originally decorated with up to 140,000 tiny gold studs forming a herringbone pattern. The studs are around 0.2 millimetres (0.0079 in) wide and 1 millimetre (0.039 in) in length with over a thousand studs embedded in each square centimetre.[6][7] David Dawson, Director of Wiltshire Heritage Museum has stated that: "The gold studs are remarkable evidence of the skill and craftsmanship of Bronze Age goldsmiths – quite rightly described as 'the work of the gods'"[8] Optician Ronald Rabbetts has said that "Only children and teenagers, and those adults who had become myopic naturally or due to the nature of their work as children, would have been able to create and manufacture such tiny objects."[6]
It is thought that the gold came from Ireland, and the dagger was made in Brittany. The hilt lay forgotten for over 40 years from the 1960s, having been sent to Professor Atkinson at Cardiff University, and found by one of his successors in 2005.[8]
You can see Bush Barrow from Stonehenge - it's the one with a bush on top.
 

titch

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i was there today!! last time i was there i was in my late teens, now after all these years the stones are still there unchanged, whereas i have gained a waistline and lost hair.

There is no carpark near it now, you can get a bus all the way from the visitor center, a bus half the way then a walk or walk all the way, i walked all the way, passed burial mounds and a cursus, thankfully a sign panel showed were the cursus was otherwise i wouldn't have noticed it.


When i was there as a teen i was a bit underwhelmed, the stones seemed small, i wanted to get in and touch them, but now i am middle aged i appreciated it a lot more, despite being soaked to the bone and not getting dry till i got back to london it was well worth the trip.

facebookburialmounds.jpg
 

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escargot

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i was there today!! last time i was there i was in my late teens, now after all these years the stones are still there unchanged, whereas i have gained a waistline and lost hair.

There is no carpark near it now, you can get a bus all the way from the visitor center, a bus half the way then a walk or walk all the way, i walked all the way, passed burial mounds and a cursus, thankfully a sign panel showed were the cursus was otherwise i wouldn't have noticed it.


When i was there as a teen i was a bit underwhelmed, the stones seemed small, i wanted to get in and touch them, but now i am middle aged i appreciated it a lot more, despite being soaked to the bone and not getting dry till i got back to london it was well worth the trip.

View attachment 5427
Fantastic! I'm jealous and so is Techy. :worship:
 

CuriousIdent

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Visited last Autumn for the first time. I've no idea what it was intended as, or for, but I am definitely certain this isn't just a random assembling of stones. So many theories for the site, I refuse to think it's accident or coincidence. :)

I would have liked to get very slightly closer to it than you are now allowed, but still there must be a few worn in butt shaped impressions on those stones from visitors across the years.
 

Swifty

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The last time I was there, it was still fenced off and heavily guarded. I'd love to go back now.
 

titch

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Thanks for my new desktop. Hope you don't mind.
Not at all! I will get my people to get in touch with yours to arrange a suitable Fee.
The last time I was there, it was still fenced off and heavily guarded. I'd love to go back now.
It's still fenced Off, but you can get a good look, or you can pay to go inside early morning. Or go during the summer solstice and dance with the hippy women.

It is well worth a visit even though you cannot touch the stones, maybe a winter visit to avoid the crowd would be best, and walk the entire way to see the barrows and cursus
 
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Swifty

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Not at all! I will get my people to get in touch with yours to arrange a suitable Fee.

It's still fenced Off, but you can get a good looking, or you can pay to go inside early morning. Or go during the summer solstice and dance with the hippy women.

It is well worth a visit even though you cannot touch the stones, maybe a winter visit to avoid the crowd would be best, and walk the entire way to see the barrows and cursus
Ah, I though the fences were down ... I visited one of the barrows the last time I was there and walked about inside a corn circle ... I remember regretting not taking some of the corn to make alien looking corn dollies.
 

titch

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Ah, I though the fences were down ... I visited one of the barrows the last time I was there and walked about inside a corn circle ... I remember regretting not taking some of the corn to make alien looking corn dollies.
All the barrows where out of bounds when I was there to prevent erosion, understandable but sad
 

geepee

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I've just returned from a holiday in Brittany. You are aware that the alignments in and around Carnac make Stonehenge look like a sandcastle? Four kilometres long. Dozens of dolmens, menhirs in every wooded area. Perhaps the builders of the trilithons in Wiltshire took a holiday and never came back?
 

titch

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i dunno about a sandcastle, 3 ton stones moved from wales, 30+ton stones dragged 20 odd miles by gangs of 200 people, then set up in line with the summer n winter solstice, i find it vastly impressive.
 

pandacracker

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A friend and I went last year to try out the all new Stonehenge experience. We started off in the museum which is interesting and has a small section showing how Stonehenge has worked it's way into our culture and psyche over the years. There was also some sort of, appropriately dressed, Pagan/Wiccan person talking to an American/Canadian tourist about earth energies and somesuch. I tried to evesdrop as I looked at the exhibits but they were talking too quietly. Oh, and outside a reconstruction of huts with neolithic bits and bobs and very chatty volunteer guides.

There was a series of short audio guides you can put on your smartphone which my mate did and you can play when you get to the appropriate section of the site. We walked the length of the Cursus, joined up with the ceremonial way and approached the stones that way. If memory serves, the final part of the ceremonial way is up a slope that is thought to have been the remnants of an old water course. It points directly at the heel stone, one hypothesis being that the heel stone was there all the time and not dragged to it's position by ancient man, it's surface hasn't been worked either.

I like the idea that there was some sort of natural phenomena already in situ that spoke to the ancients and they began to elaborate on it.

We got the bus back, had a look around the shop (not impressed with the choice of fridge magnets!) overheard another North American gushing to the cashier how her dream was to see Stonehenge for real and now she has, got in the car and went for a beer.

£17.50 each. Bit steep but it was good to be able to wander around the larger site and get a better idea of how much there is.
 
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