Strange Things As Food & Drink

James_H

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The strange story of 'White Coke'.

While clear colas were a fad in the '90s (and I've seen clear coke from Japan in this day and age), it was invented after WWII for Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov.

He loved Coca Cola but wouldn't be seen imbibing such a running drink of capitalism so he asked the company to make it look like vodka. Thus, 'The colorless version of Coca-Cola was bottled using straight, clear glass bottles sporting a white cap with a red star in the middle.'

'While all goods entering the Soviet zone normally took weeks to be cleared by authorities, Coca-Cola shipments were never stopped.'
 

escargot

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The strange story of 'White Coke'.

While clear colas were a fad in the '90s (and I've seen clear coke from Japan in this day and age), it was invented after WWII for Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov.

He loved Coca Cola but wouldn't be seen imbibing such a running drink of capitalism so he asked the company to make it look like vodka. Thus, 'The colorless version of Coca-Cola was bottled using straight, clear glass bottles sporting a white cap with a red star in the middle.'

'While all goods entering the Soviet zone normally took weeks to be cleared by authorities, Coca-Cola shipments were never stopped.'
Reminds me of an ad I've just seen for 'Guinness Clear', i.e. a pint of water.
 
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My father was the state manager of the company he worked for when I was a child. One Christmas, he was sent a hamper from a Japanese client which included an entire chicken (cooked) in a can. It was possibly the most revolting foodstuff I've ever encountered. Pale, soggy meat and a pile of bones in a mess of gelatinous goop. Almost 50 years later, I can still smell it.
I've seen whole cooked chickens in a can in some USA grocery markets, and thought it was a dumb, somewhat gross idea.

One afternoon in Santa Cruz (where I lived in a sort of hippie hobo jungle at the time), I bought one out of desperation -- wanted to make a soup for a dozen hungry nomads, and here was a three-pound chicken, already cooked, for less than five dollars, which was more in line with my budget than the other available meat choices just then. So I bought this canned whole chicken, took it back to our jungle home, started up a batch of soup vegetables, and opened the can...

...to pull out the awfullest looking specimen of pre-cooked poultry I'd ever laid eyes on. There wasn't any fat to speak of, the skin and meat hung off the bones in tatters, and the chicken had obviously been the skinniest, puniest chook in the battery, because that carcass looked mummified, even dripping wet. And, just like Lord Lucan already told us, the thing smelled off.

We ate vegetarian soup in our camp that night.
 
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Several people upthread mentioned squirrels as human food. Having grown up in central West Virginia, I can tell you that lots of folks in the rural and forested parts of the USA eat squirrel on a regular basis.

It's a big enough deal in the Eastern hillbilly states that there's an official, legal squirrel hunting season in mid-autumn, when the little bastards are nice and fat and getting ready to hibernate.

Now, I wouldn't eat an urban squirrel on a bet -- those things survive on a diet of cigarette butts, McDonald's French fries, and the occasional crack rock. Wild, forest-dwelling squirrels in season, though, are a different story. They eat nuts and fruit and acorns and peoples' garden crops, which renders them plump and downright palatable.

Folks roast them in the oven, or fry them, or make squirrel gravy. They're not bad! Better than groundhog or possum, not as good as well-cooked raccoon, not nearly as good as deer meat, but tasty.

Oven-roasting their wee squirrel heads used to be the practice, too: first you ate the jaw muscle, then cracked the skull with a nutcracker, scooped out the tender brains, and yummed 'em down like softboiled eggs. Many of the older folks I knew regarded squirrel brains as a real treat and looked forward to this delicacy as squirrel season approached. Now, eating squirrel brains is strongly advised against by county ag agents and health personnel as putting the eater at severe risk for prion exposure.
 

James_H

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It is certainly possible to filter beer to make it clear: this is how malt-based wine coolers (including the us version of Smirnoff ice) are made in the USA. The process also removed the flavour, hence the added flavours in those beverages.
 

escargot

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The Guinness Clear drink is actually the finest tapwater. The idea is to encourage responsible drinking by suggesting people order glasses of water between 'proper' drinks. It's all on their website.
 

gordonrutter

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My nephew ate one at a wedding in Ecuador. He'd gone over there to do a bit of missionary work and helped to build a wooden church,
I saw them for sale in a South America. Looked like they had been run over by a steam roller and then deep fried, fur and all.
 

maximus otter

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Several people upthread mentioned squirrels as human food. ...there's an official, legal squirrel hunting season in mid-autumn, when the little bastards are nice and fat and getting ready to hibernate.

Wild, forest-dwelling squirrels in season, though, are a different story. They eat nuts and fruit and acorns and peoples' garden crops, which renders them plump and downright palatable.

They're not bad! ...not nearly as good as deer meat, but tasty.
+1, and here in the UK they’re:

a) An invasive destructive pest species;

b) ... with no close season, so they can be taken all year round with no bag limits!

Who’s up for some “flightless partridge”?

maximus otter
 

Tribble

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I saw them for sale in a South America. Looked like they had been run over by a steam roller and then deep fried, fur and all.
So if you're invited for lunch in certain parts of South America and someone says "Been devising new recipes, who wants to be the guinea pig?" run away.
 

OneWingedBird

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Maggot ice cream, I suppose it is grub in the literal sense.

Fans of the sweet treat could soon find grubs up in their cornet with the fly larvae being touted as a high-protein and sustainable alternative to the traditional dairy-made frozen product.

While interest has been growing in insects as a more eco-friendly food source in the West, a South African food maker has gone a step further and used maggots harvested from flies as a basis for ice cream.
Sky
 

Draheste

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One of my mum's cousins, in SW France, used to hunt and eat coypus. He had a special technique to trap and skin them. My parents were mildly interested to taste it, but the opportunity never came. That cousin said that Coypus (Nutrias) tasted a bit like pine resin.
 

Lord Lucan

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Mmmm, this looks good!
Chocolate_Coated_Tarantula_15g_Front_600x.jpg
Foodstuffs from this New Zealand based company have been recently popping up on my Instagram feed.
According tho their website:

A large whole roasted zebra tarantula, dipped in delicious 50% dark, dairy-free chocolate.

Approx. 1 Tarantula. / 4cm - 10cm

Our packaging: Outer box, 100% recyclable. Inner plastic, home compostable.

All of our insects are raised for human consumption and are sourced from sustainable, ethical and reputable farms throughout Asia and are prepared with care, here in New Zealand.

You can also get crickets, scorpions (in lollipop form too) and various other bugs. Also bug flour for all of your baking needs.

Here's their website: https://www.eatcrawlers.co.nz/
 

Swifty

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Mmmm, this looks good!
View attachment 17287
Foodstuffs from this New Zealand based company have been recently popping up on my Instagram feed.
According tho their website:

A large whole roasted zebra tarantula, dipped in delicious 50% dark, dairy-free chocolate.

Approx. 1 Tarantula. / 4cm - 10cm

Our packaging: Outer box, 100% recyclable. Inner plastic, home compostable.

All of our insects are raised for human consumption and are sourced from sustainable, ethical and reputable farms throughout Asia and are prepared with care, here in New Zealand.

You can also get crickets, scorpions (in lollipop form too) and various other bugs. Also bug flour for all of your baking needs.

Here's their website: https://www.eatcrawlers.co.nz/
I sent a scorpion in a vodka flavoured lollipop to Fridesy once .. it was past its eat by date so I warned her about that but it raises two questions: how the fuck does anyone assess the use by date of a dead scorpion in a lollipop anyway and ... did she eat it just for a laugh? ..
 

JamesWhitehead

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Ashens has been sent a big tin of Ox Tongues.

They are at least fifty-one years old! He has a taste . . .

As with all Ashens videos, there is a lot of padding.

I think a lot of people are not even familiar these days with the pressed tongues, which were traditionally served with a bit of lettuce and tomato as a salad. Warning: the tin contains whole tongues . . .

Does he swallow? No! It's very icky. :puke2:
 

Mythopoeika

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I think a lot of people are not even familiar these days with the pressed tongues, which were traditionally served with a bit of lettuce and tomato as a salad. Warning: the tin contains whole tongues . . .
Such a thing was regularly served up at my school. The last one I ever had still had the surface of the tongue attached.
Needless to say, I didn't eat that.
 

Ladyloafer

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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...-toes-to-canada-for-use-in-notorious-cocktail

Man sends his own frostbitten toes to pub in canada to use in their 'special'cocktails.

The beverage consists of a mummified human toe floating in a whiskey shot; patrons must let the digit – or its blackened nail – touch their lips in order to receive a certificate and qualify for admittance to the Sourtoe Cocktail Club.

...
“We usually don’t get frostbitten toes. Usually, they’re from gout or diabetes, or they’re lawnmowers or chainsaws or accidents … to get a frostbitten toe, that’s phenomenal.” There are currently three toes in use.
 
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