Study: Name Determines One's Life Prospects

Mama_Kitty

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#1
This was posted on a 'Pregnancy and Baby' message board I visit and I've copied and pasted it exactly as it was. Not really sure why he chose to post it here and his research seems as peculiar as his grammar.

I'm not sure what his method is for determining the appropriate name to go with a surname, perhaps we should all email him before naming our babies, or maybe he just wants celebrities to consult him first. I can understand the comment about Gwynnie's baby, that's peculiar naming and will certainly affect the poor child as she grows up, but I don't think that takes much research!

Title: Names Determine IQ
Msg No: 12280.1
From: solamendavid
Date: 11-Dec 20:02

Gwyneth Paltrow Eric McCormack Julia Roberts Sad Baby Names
Solamen David

I have researched 200,612 names:
AETNA POLICY HOLDERS 30166
BLUE CROSS POLICY HOLDERS 30112
CELEBRITY 2000
CEO 974
CONGRESSMAN 2000
DECLARATION SIGNERS 56
ENCYCLOPEDIA, WHO'S WHO 45184
FAMED AMERICAN 1447
FELONS, MURDERERS, PREDATORS 2200
GENIUS 41
GOVERNOR 200
MAYOR 800
NOBEL PRIZE 747
PHD PROFESSOR 8000
PRESIDENT 43
PULITZER PRIZE 1500
RICHEST IN THE WORLD 696
SENATOR 1000
STREET PEOPLE, RUNAWAY, REHAB 800
WELFARE RECIPIENTS 72646

There are two levels of intelligence at which humans name: the cognitive "agape" level and the emotional "phileo" level. Please name at the cognitive level. God renamed Abram, ABRAHAM, at the cognitive level; God renamed Abram's wife Sarai, SARAH, at the cognitive level; God renamed their grandson Jacob, ISRAEL, at the cognitive level; Moses renamed Oshea, JOSHUA, at the cognitive level; Jesus renamed Simon, SIMON PETER--the first use of a surname, at the cognitive level. Why did Jesus give Simon the surname Peter? NAMES DETERMINE LIFE OUTCOMES. Simon's mother named him to fail; Jesus renamed him to succeed.

When anyone asks me whether or not to use a middle initial, my answer is stay away from it. Only three of 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence had middle names and the political IQ has been going downhill ever since. Names are like elements on the periodic table. Some first names do not go with certain last names, and adding a middle name or middle initial is like adding the element Sulfur to H2O and getting H2SO4 sulfuric acid, an exceedingly corrosive substance used to manufacture explosives.

I found many an explosive combination while researching first+last name combinations as a contractor working for Aetna in 1980. They had an illness-injury issue. When I later contracted to Blue Cross, I found hundreds of exactly the same first+last name combinations that also had an illness-injury issue, and they were completely different people. Years later, while contracted to three welfare projects, I found hundreds of those identical name combinations on welfare. What does that tell you? Each of those first+last name combinations is a volatile explosive amalgamation. Consider the following.

Which ([boy first name] + [Smith]) had an illness-injury history with Blue Cross, was also a welfare recipient, has NEVER won a Nobel Prize, is NOT the name of even one of the 3985 PhD professors at MIT and Stanford, is NOT the name of even one of the 696 world's richest people, and is NOT the name of even one of the CEOs of the top 974 US corporations, but IS the name of two of the most fiendish murderers in recent US history? ERIC SMITH. Is ERIC the first name a SMITH should give their son? No! ERIC is the first name a MCCORMACK should give their son. ERIC SMITH, age 9, strangled a defenseless cat, and at the age of 13 bludgeoned to death 4-year-old Derrick Robie. Months later, a completely different ERIC SMITH, age 41, decapitated his own teenage son.

Julia and Daniel's boy should have been named JOSEPH MODER [not Joey] or any of the following: Earnest Edmond Elliot Geoffry Isaac Jerrold Joel Kerson Matthias Noel Redmond Robert [not Bob]. Place each recommended name in your [http://www.mozilla.org/] browser, add letters PhD [e.g. Kerson PhD] and assess the first name. For example, KERSON HUANG, PhD, Professor of Physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is a leading authority on quantum physics. If Julia Roberts and hubby had researched their daughter's name, their baby girl would have been named [SPELL IT LIKE I SPELL IT] Kirstin Moder [NO MIDDLE NAME] or Kristin Moder [NO MIDDLE] or Suzanne Moder [NO MIDDLE] or Lorra Moder or Marjory or Maryanne or Allison or Shirly.

Gwyneth Paltrow named daughter Apple Blythe Alison Martin, born 14 May 2004, after Gwyneth's mother. Neither Apple nor Blythe nor Alison are completely compatible with the surname Martin. Here are a few first names [NO MIDDLE NAME] that will gift Gwyneth and Chris Martin's baby girl with extraordinary intelligence: Alexandra Crystal Dyan Ramona Suze Suzie Cami Cassidy Cynthia Darci Faith Gretchen Janis Karin Kina Tina Nika Nita Virginia Alicen Eliza Jenna Jasmine Mellisa Pattie.

Will & Grace star Eric McCormack, 39, and his wife, Janet, 36, named their first child, born 1 July 2002, Finnigan Holden McCormack. McCormack requires very special last-name-specific first names [NO MIDDLE NAME] to produce superior life outcomes: Christos Dillon Dixon Gibson Hollis Richarde Richmond Willeam Duncan Gunnar Magnus Marcus Matthus Robin.

Email Solamen David at jasus[at]cox-internet.com; type "Names" in the subject field.

747 Nobel Prizes have been awarded to gifted people since 1901. Which of the 22 most common US last names has NEVER won a Nobel Prize, is NOT the last name of even one of the 3985 PhD professors at MIT and Stanford, and is NOT the last name of even one of the 696 world's richest people, and is NOT the last name of even one of the CEOs of the top 974 US corporations? Is this your last name?

Solamen David
Nacogdoches Texas 75965
where the shuttle exploded
 

TheQuixote

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#2
:laughing: If I'd known that intelligence was due to your name then I would have changed mine by deedpoll years ago.

I still haven't really forgiven my mother for admitting that she chose my first name after a character in a Mills and Boon romance. She hadn't been prepared for a girl and couldn't think of anything else. :|


That guy is definitely chuntering on though.

Solomen David's Blog

I want to work on a cruise ship and escort guests on shore excursions. I am an historian who holds a B.A. in government from Angelo State University, and bachelors-equivalency Texas teacher certificates in government, kinesiology, history, physics, chemistry, and biology. I am M.C.S.E. certified in Windows NT 4.0 and a former actor-entertainer with credits that include: stand-up comedian at the Comedy Store and the Improv in Los Angeles, episode music writer and small acting roles at ABC, a vocalist with Hanna-Barbera, and a singer-songwriter recording artist with Capitol Records. Recently I worked on projects for Deloitte as trainer and curriculum developer, performing a variety of purchasing tasks including financial analyst. I smile all day, laugh all night, dance until dawn, and enjoy traveling, hiking, meeting new people, and sharing my vast research of ancient cultures. I am an authority on the timeline of the Bible and the parallel timeline of ancient Egypt.


Although there is the *art* ofGematria which I'm assuming he is using in re: to his theory.

I like this- The Gematricular. My name is 98% evil apparently. Nice.

The forteantimes.com site comes out at 60% evil.
 

beakboo1

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#3
:lol: My maiden name is 99% evil, but add my husbands name to the end and I'm 80% good!
I really need to get a life. :shock:
 

Min Bannister

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#5
Hehe, Hupcap must be good for you Beak! Physick you must be WAY more evil that that! ;) I am only 16% evil which is a bit of a disappointment.

I love the advice at the bottom though.

"Wasn't that fun? Now waste your time by Killing Everyone!"[/i]
 

Electric_Monk

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#6
I tried my first name, then last name, then first and last name, and only got 50% good, 50% evil.
But I stuck in first, middle and last all together, and got 80% evil, that sounds more like it ;)

Hmm, and sticking my middle name in alone produces 99% evil...

And now I'm going to try the "Kill everyone" link.

Edit: Aww, it won't work due to the firewall here at work.
 

Leaferne

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#8
How can you call yourself an historian or even "expert" with just a BA? :roll:

"Leaferne" is 50% evil, but my real name is 99% good. We will leave the conclusions as an exercise for the reader. ;)
 

BaronVonHoopla

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#9
Leaferne said:
How can you call yourself an historian or even "expert" with just a BA?
That's the stupidest thing I have read in a long time. Have you ever heard of a recent invention called BOOKS? You really should look into them, they are chock full of information, and now there are so many of them about varying topics of interest that one might be able to learn things, if motivated enough.

Great world isn't it?

If you think the only way you can learn, or become an 'expert' of anything is to have your mind shaped by years of paid schooling, I shall thank my lucky stars that I only encounter you in cyberspace.

-Fitz
 

NilesCalder

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#10
While it is true that experience means far more than education in so many things in the case of academia it's the Degree that is seen to be important.

If you think the only way you can learn, or become an 'expert' of anything is to have your mind shaped by years of paid schooling, I shall thank my lucky stars that I only encounter you in cyberspace.
Now I wouldn't call myself an "Expert" in rude and abusive subtext I do however know enough to recognise it. While a fair "there's more to expertise than academic qualifications" would be reasonable answer to Leaferne the above is not.

The question was a fair one and deserves equal treatment.
 

BaronVonHoopla

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#11
I stand by what I wrote. While I understand that just reading some books won't get you a job as a professor at any school, or a job as something like an archeologist, you certainly can school yourself in certain subjects, and most definitely be considered an expert if you work hard enough.

My father never went to school a day in his life, no word of a lie, but he knows more about all forms of music, and old litereature than I probably ever will. He is never without a book in his hand, and constanly has 'projects' of his own devise that he is looking into. He is as close to an expert on Early American folk music as I know of.

There is more to learning than having some letters following your name, and I will always take people to bat for comments like Leaferne's, who I am sure is a charming and vivacious person in real life, but who has, in personal opinion, a somewhat ignorant view of educational merit.

Again, that is my personal opinion, and I don't believe I wrote anything rude. If I did, I apologize, it wasn't intended.

-Fitz
 

BaronVonHoopla

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#12
I just re-read my first post, and it is actually incredibly rude.

I heartily apologize for the tone, while I still stand by the content. I think it was the eye-rolling smiley face that got to me, and I sort of blew a gasket there for a second.

At any rate, my opinion has been voiced, and I have de-railed this topic for long enough, so please continue with on-topic replies, unless there are people who would like to take a swing at me, I deserve it.

-Fitz
 
A

Anonymous

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#13
close but no cigar...

and it's not just names... :shock:

Career determines a person's hairstyle

A person's choice of hairstyle depends on their career, according to a survey.

Brylcreem found that Mullets were a popular hairstyle for those whose professions mean they are not seen by the public much; including long distance lorry drivers, taxi drivers and even DJs.

Blokes with cropped hair were far more likely to be employed in manual jobs than those with long hair, with 45% of builders having short-cropped hairstyles.

Entrepreneurs had the most individual hair styles often following no set trend, with Richard Branson sporting longer hair, Bill Gates sports a traditional short side parted style, whilst Donald Trump has a complex flicked style.

Lino Carbosiero, Brylcreem Style Director said: "The survey results are pretty remarkable as they show that hair rather than clothes provide a more accurate indication of a modern British bloke's lifestyle, job and career prospects.

"It's interesting because we like to think we're all individuals, and that our hair and clothing is a result of personal preferences, when in fact it seems that we all are very influenced by our workplace and co-workers - although I'm sure many of us won't like to admit that!"
so if you've got the wrong name and the wrong haircut...
 

Electric_Monk

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#14
My clothes are defined by whatever I think I might look smart in, and my hair is defined by whatever the hairdresser does when I ask for it to be shortened, with a number 3 back and sides ;)

I would actually like fancy hair, but I'd be afraid that it wouldn't suit me, or I wouldn't be able to maintain it. I tried to use gel once and it was a disaster.
 
A

Anonymous

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#15
Colin said:
I would actually like fancy hair, but I'd be afraid that it wouldn't suit me, or I wouldn't be able to maintain it. I tried to use gel once and it was a disaster.
O go on! A nice simple, low mantanence choppy cut? It'd look good on you ;)
 

PeniG

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#16
That Gematria thing is bewildering. My writing webpage is 39% evil, 61% good, but I myself (using my middle initial) am only 14% evil or 1% evil (without the middle initial)! I don't see how I can write something more evil than I am myself.

Also, the website from which I download certain unusable bureaucratic forms from a governmental entity with which the company I work for does business - which, having worked with these forms, any rational person would agree was more than 50% evil - also worked out as only 1% evil.

The obvious conclusion, if we accept the premise that "the Gematriculator provides only results that are absolutely correct," is that evil isn't what we puny humans think it is, at all.

The really freaky thing, though, is that the person from the original post, the one with the BA and the remarkably interesting CV (he may be weird but at least he hasn't been bored) is from the town I went to high school in, the obscure West Texas college town of San Angelo, a locus of high dullness. Or is it...? Apparently, I was blinded by familiarity. Who would have though ASU could have produced anyone as weird at that? There's hope for the old town yet!
 

Imperial_Call

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#17
Lobelia Overhill is 1& evil and 99% good ...
My real name is the same ...
Well that blows D'Mother's theory out of the water :lol:
 

Ermintruder

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#18
My post is about first-names, and a curious observation regarding an improbable association (therefore: only very-slightly related to the original purpose of this thread).

I've recently realised that I know of five instances where there are sibling groups (ranging in size from two to three persons) where the youngest member of each is (a female) named Molly.

Is there some strange unspoken naming tradition going on? A fundamental hidden name-meaning I don't know about? Or some curious universal influence guiding the choices?
 

kamalktk

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#19
My post is about first-names, and a curious observation regarding an improbable association (therefore: only very-slightly related to the original purpose of this thread).

I've recently realised that I know of five instances where there are sibling groups (ranging in size from two to three persons) where the youngest member of each is (a female) named Molly.

Is there some strange unspoken naming tradition going on? A fundamental hidden name-meaning I don't know about? Or some curious universal influence guiding the choices?
Relative popularity of the name at the time of their birth?
 

EnolaGaia

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#21
... I've recently realised that I know of five instances where there are sibling groups (ranging in size from two to three persons) where the youngest member of each is (a female) named Molly. ...
Just for the record ... Are you sure Molly is the formally given name in all these cases, rather than a family nickname?
 

Ermintruder

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#22
Are you sure Molly is the formally given name
Very good point. No- I am completely-unsure if this/these is/are a familial contraction, a nick-name / given-name, or a formally-recorded name (in any of the five instances).
 
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