Stuff You've Just Bought

escargot

Beloved of Ra
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
24,281
Likes
18,024
Points
309
That sounds good. I still have my hand turned machine as well as a electric one. I do like sewing machines :) I'd love to have a treadle.
My late Welsh Gran, a locally famous seamstress, had hand-operated and treadle machines and could make anything on them.

Turning a machine with the right hand while guiding fabric with the left is a skill. Gran would use the hand machine for a 'quick' sewing job. The faster and more powerful treadle was for longer sessions.

Can remember her telling me about a craze from her childhood of wearing 'monkey hats', which were long pointy caps like a Santa hat without the fur or pompoms. She sometimes made us toy monkeys with little suits and their very own money hats!

Gran was born around 1900 so the kiddy fashions she described were Edwardian. Wow, eh!
 

escargot

Beloved of Ra
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
24,281
Likes
18,024
Points
309
In the '60s my family were friendly with local Irish families for whom Val Doonican was a huge hero. Nobody was allowed to speak when his show was on, every Sunday evening. We kids'd have to sit cross-legged on the floor in total silence; the only permitted voice was the mother or aunt who'd occasionally nod and murmur 'Sure he's lovely!' and 'Beautiful singing!'

Looking back, I can see how Val's show was a comfort for people far from home.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteBirdie certificated Princess
Staff member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
8,734
Likes
8,805
Points
279
Used to watch it with my gran, sitting next to her on the couch with some fabric or embroidery or yarn to play with :)

She thought he was terribly daring, wearing a knitted jumper on telly instead of a suit!
 

Tigerhawk

Resistance is futile!
Joined
Jan 20, 2016
Messages
1,698
Likes
1,662
Points
154
Location
Skaro
Used to watch it with my gran, sitting next to her on the couch with some fabric or embroidery or yarn to play with :)

She thought he was terribly daring, wearing a knitted jumper on telly instead of a suit!
He wasn't allowed to wear his birthday suit! (It needed a thorough ironing!)
 

Ogdred Weary

Cosmically Triggered
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
1,878
Likes
2,950
Points
159
The following two books - 1177 BC The Year Civilisation Collapsed and The Mystery Of The Exploding Teeth And Other Curiousities From The History Of Medicine.
Both sound interesting, although I've read Goodreads reviews of the former, where, after having read it; the readers are still uncertain why or how civilisation collapsed.
 

graylien

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Messages
4,383
Likes
2,937
Points
169
A carbon monoxide detector as my landlord has never fitted one and my flat adjoins the cupboard with the gas boiler.

I'm pretty sure he's legally obliged to install one and if I went out of my way to cause a fuss about it he'd probably get his builder mate to put up a £2.99 job in the hall that he bought from China on eBay.

But I'd rather pay for a decent British Standards Certified model myself and keep it in my room. They're really not that pricey in the grand scheme of things.

Also a reproduction film poster for Roger Corman's Attack Of The Crab Monsters.

And Jenny Randle's book about The Men In Black.
 

gordonrutter

Justified & Ancient
Staff member
Joined
Aug 3, 2001
Messages
1,598
Likes
1,148
Points
184
A carbon monoxide detector as my landlord has never fitted one and my flat adjoins the cupboard with the gas boiler.

I'm pretty sure he's legally obliged to install one and if I went out of my way to cause a fuss about it he'd probably get his builder mate to put up a £2.99 job in the hall that he bought from China on eBay.

But I'd rather pay for a decent British Standards Certified model myself and keep it in my room. They're really not that pricey in the grand scheme of things.

Also a reproduction film poster for Roger Corman's Attack Of The Crab Monsters.

And Jenny Randle's book about The Men In Black.
I’ve had to switch our carbon monoxide detector off. The constant beeping it’s making is giving me headaches and making me sleepy.
 

escargot

Beloved of Ra
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
24,281
Likes
18,024
Points
309
Our kitchen has a little awkward apace the nothing fits into. I sent off for a plastic set of shelves on wheels to shove in there. It came today so I assembled it and will fill it with bottles of bleach and stuff when I can get off the sofa after my 6-2 work shift.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteBirdie certificated Princess
Staff member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
8,734
Likes
8,805
Points
279
A real score! I didn't manage to get to the V&A Opus Anglicanum exhibition a couple of years ago, although I did buy the book. While drooling over the online gallery I noted that one of the classes they were running was a wee foliate head. In embroidery these green men occur in a firmly christian context, and mainly (perhaps wholly?) on copes.

These liturgical vestments are superb showcases from embroidery. As the designs develop over time there is a fashion for architectural framing - individual motifs are framed, kept separate and unified as a whole design by a network of eg pillars or vines. The foliate heads are in the places corbels would be - which is a nice tie in with where they are found in church architecture at this date.

The class projects are detailed in the book but I wasn't confident of sourcing the right materials and thought I might end up with mountains of expensive stuff I'd never use.

So I emailed the designer, Sarah Homfrey (This is her instagram) and she had one kit left on the shelf and has sold it to me for a tenner! Rather than the £40 investment I was looking at one my own.

Happy Happy Joy Joy!

This is the V&A page... 1557751098282.png
 

escargot

Beloved of Ra
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
24,281
Likes
18,024
Points
309
A real score! I didn't manage to get to the V&A Opus Anglicanum exhibition a couple of years ago, although I did buy the book. While drooling over the online gallery I noted that one of the classes they were running was a wee foliate head. In embroidery these green men occur in a firmly christian context, and mainly (perhaps wholly?) on copes.

These liturgical vestments are superb showcases from embroidery. As the designs develop over time there is a fashion for architectural framing - individual motifs are framed, kept separate and unified as a whole design by a network of eg pillars or vines. The foliate heads are in the places corbels would be - which is a nice tie in with where they are found in church architecture at this date.

The class projects are detailed in the book but I wasn't confident of sourcing the right materials and thought I might end up with mountains of expensive stuff I'd never use.

So I emailed the designer, Sarah Homfrey (This is her instagram) and she had one kit left on the shelf and has sold it to me for a tenner! Rather than the £40 investment I was looking at one my own.

Happy Happy Joy Joy!

This is the V&A page...
Do you remember when the Clothes Show had a competition to design vestments for the Archbishop of Canterbury? The chosen finish was white with what looked like the flames of Hell itself licking up. His Grace or whatever didn't seem impressed. Hilarious.
 
Top