The Anomaly: An Unusual Seismic Signal

Sharon Hill

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#1
It all started when a wave swept across Oklahoma on June 24, just before 11:11 a.m. local time. It buzzed one seismometer after another, seeming to ping-pong hundreds of miles across the state. This wave didn’t just breeze by—it pulsed like a geologic heartbeat for about 10 minutes.

“Well, that’s odd,” geophysicist Jake Walter at the Oklahoma Geological Survey remembers thinking. He had spotted the regular pulse as it scrolled across a big flat screen TV in the OGS seismic lab. At first he thought it might be a glitch in the monitoring devices, but when that happens, the signal is usually limited to a single instrument. That morning’s buzz, as he later found out, rattled 52 stations across the state.

Andrew Thiel, an OGS analyst tasked with investigating the event, traced similar signals back to at least March. Through the summer, the waves swept across the state with increasing frequency, intensity, and spread, sometimes sticking around for more than 20 minutes. But they always happened in the morning, and never on a Sunday.


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...ves-rattled-entire-state-scientists-know-why/

Of note, there are regularly "mine explosions" that register 2.0 Mw on the USGS networks for earthquakes. It doesn't make a lot of sense but I wonder if there isn't some particular situation of earth + sky that makes them register this way on occasion. MANY years ago, I participated in a study of a neighborhood who complained vehement about blasts from a quarry but the intensity they reported did not correspond to the intensity of the shots, any weather condition, or bedrock characteristic we could pinpoint.

Atmospheric acoustics is ripe for more investigation. It almost certainly might shed light on the reports of "booms" heard worldwide.
 

Sharon Hill

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#4
Do they do fracking there ?

Fracking has been suspended again in the UK as it is once again causing earthquakes.
Oklahoma had a huge increase in seismicity due to fracking but that is declining. The interesting part of this story is that this wasn't fracking, they pinpointed the events that caused the signal, but the data was weird:

Speed estimates suggest that the signals swept across Oklahoma much slower than energy usually moves through the ground—during an earthquake, for instance, surface waves usually bop along at about 2,200 miles an hour or more. But Oklahoma’s waves weren’t exactly going slow, either, sweeping across the state at sometimes supersonic speeds of nearly 900 miles an hour.
 

Sharon Hill

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#8
If you think that is propaganda, then you are woefully ignorant of the workings of the magnetic fields.

Sorry to have to tell you that.
As a geologist, I don't consider myself "woefully ignorant" about physics and how the earth works. The magnetic poles roam from true north/south and I have to adjust my compass for the declination. But, go ahead, please explain how "shifting poles" (whatever that means) can cause booming noises or unusual propagation of seismic waves.
 

INT21

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#9
Ask Mythopeoika, It was his suggestion.

I was just responding to you claiming that pole shifting was End of World propaganda.

You may be a geologist, but you appear to have missed out on a lot of the recent scientific reporting of weakening and shifting patterns in the poles. Not just the usual stuff, but some quite noticeable movements.

New Scientist is your friend.

It was mine until I couldn't afford to keep the subscription.

It's all in there.

INT21.
 

Analogue Boy

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#13
Compasses to point true north for first time in 360 years

At some point over the next two weeks, compasses at Greenwich will point true north for the first time in about 360 years.
And for some parts of the UK, this may not happen for another 20 years. Either way, it is a once-in-a-lifetime event.
The angle a compass needle makes between true north and magnetic north is called declination. As the magnetic field changes all the time, so does declination at any given location.
Over the past few hundred years in the UK, declination has been negative, meaning that all compass needles have pointed west of true north.
The line of zero declination, called the agonic, is moving westward at a rate of around 12 miles (20km) a year, experts say.
By next month, the compass needle will point directly to true north at Greenwich in London, before slowly turning eastwards.

https://www.theguardian.com/science...-point-true-north-for-first-time-in-360-years
 

Analogue Boy

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#14
As a geologist, I don't consider myself "woefully ignorant" about physics and how the earth works. The magnetic poles roam from true north/south and I have to adjust my compass for the declination. But, go ahead, please explain how "shifting poles" (whatever that means) can cause booming noises or unusual propagation of seismic waves.
So what do you think it is?
 

INT21

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#15
She'll point you to the text. It's in there. They know what it is.
But aren't sure of the mechanism.
 

EnolaGaia

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#16
So what do you think it is?
Eventually, Carmichael and the OGS researchers started zeroing in on a culprit. The signal appeared to generally sweep from the southeast, where the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant sits. There, explosions are a part of daily life, rattling windows and kicking up plumes of dirt into the air.

Confirmation of this hunch finally arrived on August 16, when Thiel got in contact with Gideon Rogers, a spokesperson from the plant. The plant disposes of old ammunition each morning around 11 a.m., except on Sundays, in explosions separated by 20-second pauses.

A request for additional details about their activities is still pending. But Carmichael suspects that the ammunition is being split into a small groups that are detonated sequentially, to avoid shocking nearby populations with a single large blast. That would send out pulses of energy that can account for the unusual geologic heartbeat across the state.

Some of the confusing ping-pong effect might because the scientists were too zoomed in when looking for patterns, like examining the individual dots in a pointillist painting. Realizing the source was McAlester—which is located farther to the southeast than the vast majority of the detectors—helped them take a step back and see the whole picture.

“It was just seeing data in a different way than we’re used to,” Thiel says.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...ves-rattled-entire-state-scientists-know-why/
 

kamalktk

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#18
What was the cause? I have to subscribe to get that far into the article.
 

Sharon Hill

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#21
Ask Mythopeoika, It was his suggestion.

I was just responding to you claiming that pole shifting was End of World propaganda.

You may be a geologist, but you appear to have missed out on a lot of the recent scientific reporting of weakening and shifting patterns in the poles. Not just the usual stuff, but some quite noticeable movements.

New Scientist is your friend.

It was mine until I couldn't afford to keep the subscription.

It's all in there.

INT21.
New Scientist is not a scientific journal; it's pop sci and news. Many ideas in there are speculation or unconfirmed. Science reporting is not the same as published research.

Unless you have a geosciences degree or have a better source than that to reference, please do not insinuate that I don't know what I'm talking about. As I said, poles roam - It's not news. I am well aware of the accelerated wandering. I'm not very concerned. But in no way does a waltzing magnetic field correlate to the anomalies described in the linked story.

End Timers and catastrophists like to point to every major earthquake, volcano, sinkhole, or crack, boom, bam as a sign that we're soon to be doomed. They have latched on to the idea of pole flipping to add to their drama and sound sciencey. It is pseudoscience.
 

Swifty

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#22
Yo
New Scientist is not a scientific journal; it's pop sci and news. Many ideas in there are speculation or unconfirmed. Science reporting is not the same as published research.

Unless you have a geosciences degree or have a better source than that to reference, please do not insinuate that I don't know what I'm talking about. As I said, poles roam - It's not news. I am well aware of the accelerated wandering. I'm not very concerned. But in no way does a waltzing magnetic field correlate to the anomalies described in the linked story.

End Timers and catastrophists like to point to every major earthquake, volcano, sinkhole, or crack, boom, bam as a sign that we're soon to be doomed. They have latched on to the idea of pole flipping to add to their drama and sound sciencey. It is pseudoscience.
You'll be saying Santa isn't real and it was just jobers in costumes next.
 

Yithian

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#27
Sorry to arrive late, but I'm sure that we can get along on this interesting thread without accusing one another of ignorance.

If somebody posts something objectionable, please just pass over their post in silence; if they say it more insistently, the moderators will take care of the situation.

We have special jackets and strangely humming devices.
 

INT21

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#29
Cool down, Sharon.

Next you will be insisting that only members with the appropriate Phd can respond to your posts.

Does 'Science' meet your requirement for a suitable source of scientific knowledge ? I gave up my subscription to that at the same time I gave up the New Scientist one. It all became too expensive.

INT21.
 

INT21

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#30
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